2016 Presidential Elections - History

2016 Presidential Elections - History


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2016 Elections Clinton vs Trump

2016 was a rare year in American Presidential politics, as there was neither an incumbent President, nor Vice President in the race. Subsequently, the electoral field was wide open, particularly for candidates in the Republican party; a party that has historically had a presumptive nominee, even in elections where no sitting President or Vice President was among the runners.

As a result, the 2016 Republican primary field of candidates was the largest in American history. When the primary cycle began, the Republicans had 17 major competitors who sought to receive their party’s nomination. However, before the first votes of the Iowa caucuses were held, the field of Republican Presidential hopefuls had narrowed to five contenders.

Donald J. Trump, who began his campaign with attacks on Mexican immigrants, benefited from much greater media attention than any of his rivals. By March 16th, 2015 the only remaining candidates were Donald Trump, Senator Ted Cruz, and Governor John Kasich. On May 3rd, Trump won a decisive victory in Indiana, after which all of his opponents suspended their campaigns, and Donald Trump became the presumptive 2016 Republican Presidential nominee.

Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton announced her bid for the Democratic nomination on April 12, 2015. On April 30th Independent Senator Bernie Sanders announced his intention to run for the Democratic nomination, as well. Several other contenders briefly entered the Democratic race. However, by the time of the New Hampshire Primary, (a contest which Sanders won), only Sanders and Clinton remained. The primary season continued throughout the Spring of 2016, with Clinton and Sanders contesting every primary. When the Democratic party’s primary process ended, Clinton had support from 54% of the pledged delegates; while 46% backed Sanders. In addition, Clinton had won 78% of the Super Delegates, who were national Democratic activists. On June 16, 2016, Sanders announced he would suspend his campaign.

The Democratic Party held their 2016 Presidential convention from July 25th—28th in Philadelphia. The convention nominated Hillary Clinton as their Presidential candidate and choose Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, as Clinton’s Vice Presidential running mate.

The Republican Party held their 2016 Presidential convention from July 18th-21st, in Cleveland. Republicans selected Donald Trump as their Presidential Candidate and Indiana Governor Mike Pence, as Trump’s Vice Presidential running mate.

Clinton primarily focused her campaign on economic and health care issues. She had an in-depth, wide-ranging portfolio of policies she planned to implement as President. In addition, Clinton was considered the winner in each of the debates. In contrast, the Trump campaign concentrated on his central theme of “Making America Great Again”. Trump’s campaign was nativist, calling for the construction of a wall along the Southern border of the country; a wall for which Trump promised Mexico would pay. Trump opposed all existing American trade agreements and called for greater isolationism; seeking to eliminate American involvement in the affairs of other countries.

One past decision that negatively impacted Clinton’s Presidential bid was her practice, during her tenure as Secretary of State, of utilizing a private mail server at home, instead of using the servers housed at the State Department. Clinton’s conduct sparked major controversy and was investigated by the FBI, during the campaign. On July 5, 2016, the FBI announced that Clinton had committed no crime, and therefore, would not be charged. The matter of the e-mails remained mostly dormant, until October 28th, when the FBI Director James Comey informed Congress they had discovered a new block of e-mails during an investigation of an unrelated matter and planned to reopen the case against Clinton. On November 9th, just before election day, Comey announced that the FBI’s further investigation into Clinton had found nothing. However, many had already voted using early ballots.

The rise of social media was another dominant force that influenced the outcome of the 2016 campaign. Stories, many of them fake, were spread like wildfire on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, with users often unwilling, or unable to differentiate between real news and fake news.

There was another unusual factor, which, by most accounts, affected the 2016 American Presidential campaign. Determining precisely what impact the Russians might have had on the outcome of the 2016 US Presidential election campaign will forever remain a great unknown.

In early 2016, during the Presidential Primary Campaign, the Democratic National Committee servers were hacked by individuals working on behalf of the Russian intelligence services. In July 2016, information that was embarrassing to the Democrats and Hilary Clinton was leaked through the WikiLeaks organization. President Vladimir Putin of Russia made no effort to hide the fact he preferred Donald Trump as the next American President. The US intelligence community unanimously concluded that the Russians had indeed worked to elect Trump, both through hacking and ongoing on social media campaigns. Nevertheless, Clinton still maintained a clear lead in the polls throughout the campaign — and most observers considered Clinton the overwhelming favorite to win.

Trump made history, by neglecting to earn a single endorsement from a major media outlet, including by newspapers that had always backed the Republican nominee. In October 2016, the Washington Post released a tape from a conversation Trump conducted with Billy Bush, host of the TV show “Access Hollywood,” in which Trump states speaking of women: "I don't even wait. And when you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything. Grab them by the pu _ _y. You can do anything.” For a brief period, many Republican politicians withdrew their support for Trump. However, when it became clear Trump would not resign, the Republican leadership returned to the fold and once again supported Trump.

Lastly, there were also two significant third party candidates who ran in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election — i.e. Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate and Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate. Neither had any chance of winning, but both served as spoilers in the election. Gary Johnson drew away voters who might have voted for either candidate; while Stein, who claimed to be to the left of Clinton, and it is likely most of her supporters would have voted for Clinton, had Stein not run.

On the days leading up to election, polls continued to show Clinton with a comfortable lead. On election day itself, Hillary Clinton did ultimately win the popular vote. However, the voters of Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania —who all traditionally vote for Democratic candidates— voted for Trump by a narrow majority. The surprising swing in the votes of those three states led to Trump’s electoral college victory. It should be noted that the difference by which Trump won in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania was less than the total of the votes received Green Party candidate Jill Stein in those three states.

Participation of Eligible Voters 61.4%

Electoral Results in 1996

AlabamaClinton718,08434.6Trump1,306,9562.9
AlaskaClinton93,00737.7Trump130,41552.9
ArizonaClinton936,25045.5Trump1,021,15449.5
ArkansasClinton378,72933.8Trump677,90460.4
CaliforniaClinton7,362,49061.6Trump3,916,20932.8
ColoradoClinton1,208,09547.2Trump1,136,35444.4
ConneticutClinton884,43254.5Trump668,26641.2
DelawareClinton235,58153.4Trump185,10341.9
FloridaClinton4,605,51549.1Trump4,485,74551.3
GeorgiaClinton1,837,30045.6Trump2,068,62347.49
HawaiiClinton251,85362.3Trump121,648301.
IdahoClinton189,67727.6Trump407,19952.93
IlliniosClinton2,977,49854.47Trump157793037.38
IndianaClinton1,031,95337.9Trump1,556,22057.2
IowaClinton650,79042.2Trump798,92351.8
KansasClinton414,78836.2Trump656,00957.2
KentuckyClinton628,83432.7Trump1,202,94262.5
LouisianaClinton779,53538.4Trump1,178,00458.1
MaineClinton354,87347.8Trump334,83845.2
MarlyandClinton1,497,59160.5Trump873,64635.3
MassachusettsClinton1,964,76860.8Trump1,083,06933.5
MichiganClinton2,268,19347.3Trump2,279,80547.6
MinnesotaClinton1,366,67646.9Trump1,322,89145.4
MississippiClinton462,00139.7Trump678,47558.3
MissouriClinton1,054,88938Trump1,585,75357.1
MontanaClinton174,52136Trump274,12056.5
NebraskaClinton273,85834Trump485,81960.3
NevadaClinton537,75347.9Trump511,31945.5
New HampsClinton348,52147.6Trump345,78947.2
New JerseyClinton2,021,75655Trump1,535,51341.86
New MexicoClinton380,72448.3Trump380,72448.3
New YorkClinton4,143,87458.8Trump2,640,57037.5
North CaroliClinton2,162,07446.7Trump2,339,60350.5
North DakotClinton93,52627.8Trump216,13364.1
OhioClinton2,317,00143.5Trump2,771,98452.1
OklahomaClinton419,78828.9Trump947,93465.3
OregonClinton934,63151.7Trump742,50641.4
PennsylvaniaClinton2,844,70547.6Trump2,912,94148.8
Rhode IslandClinton249,90255.6Trump179,42139.8
South CaroliClinton849,46940.8Trump1,143,61150.25
South DakotClinton117,44231.7Trump227,70161.5
TennesseeClinton867,11048.39Trump1,517,40245.99
TexasClinton3,867,81743.4Trump4,681,59052.6
UtahClinton274,18827.8Trump452,08645.9
VermontClinton178,17961.1Trump95,05332.6
VirginiaClinton1,916,84549.9Trump1,731,15645
WashingtonClinton1,610,52454.4Trump1,129,12038.2
West VirginiClinton187,45726.5Trump486,19868.7
WisconsinClinton1,382,21046.9Trump1,409,46747.9
WyomingClinton55,94922.5Trump1744,24870.1
District of CoClinton260,22392.8Trump11,5354.1
TotalClinton64,637,14049%Trump64,637,14046.

>


Trump pulls off biggest upset in U.S. history

Markets are already reeling after the billionaire scores stunning win over Clinton.

Updated 11/09/2016 03:58 AM EST

Donald Trump stomped across the electoral map with wins in the four biggest battlegrounds of Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania. | Getty

Donald Trump is going to be the next president of the United States.

The billionaire businessman who never before held elected office shocked America and the world, defeating Hillary Clinton in an extraordinary rebuke to the nation’s political class after an ugly and divisive race that will go down as the most stunning upset in American history.

Trump did so decisively, stomping across the electoral map with wins in the four biggest battlegrounds of Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania. He defied the polls and pundits after a scorched-earth campaign against Clinton, the Republican establishment, and basic decorum, toppling the blue wall of states that Clinton had supposedly constructed to keep the White House in Democratic hands.

The nation, the markets and the world stood stunned, wondering what would come next. The Dow Futures sank as much as 750 points. The Mexico peso plunged.

“It is time for us to come together as one united people,” Trump said in a victory speech, following a concession call from Clinton at nearly 3 a.m. Eastern. “It’s time.”

Trump led an unseen rebellion of working-class voters, most of them white and so disgusted by a stalled status quo that they voted for a candidate promising dramatic change, even as Trump set disapproval records for a winning candidate. He also tapped into ethnic antagonism, vowing strict immigration controls, a ban on Muslims and a deportation force, promising an era of restoration.

“The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer,” Trump declared.

Five takeaways from an unthinkable night

Clinton had been heavily favored to win. She led national polls and in most battleground states heading into the election. Her allies were so confident that a supportive super PAC had actually redirected millions to other races.

But Trump had been underestimated from the first day of his candidacy, when he descended the gilded escalators of Trump Tower to bash Mexican immigrants as “rapists.” He went on to dispatch 16 rivals in the Republican primary before mounting a vicious campaign against Clinton in which he paraded her husband’s infidelities, repeatedly called her corrupt and questioned whether she could govern as a woman.

For 17 months, the reality television showman mesmerized the public with his unvarnished tweets, constant television presence and raucous mass rallies. His full-throttle grip on the national imagination enriched the news media and eroded standards of political civility.

It made him a hero to his fans. And they voted in droves.

In Mahoning County, a longtime Democratic stronghold and the home of Youngstown, Ohio, Trump held Clinton to roughly 50 percent. President Obama had carried the county with 63.2 percent of the vote. That was the story in place after place, as Trump sliced deeply into once large Democratic margins and built massive leads among rural voters.

“This is a movement. It's more than a normal political election,” said Sen. Jeff Sessions, the Alabama Republican who was the first GOP senator to endorse Trump in late February. “It transcends normal party politics.”

For Clinton, the loss is especially brutal. She had meticulously planned her victory party at the Javits Center in Manhattan, symbolically under an enormous glass ceiling that she hoped to break through. Instead, it was the dreams and aspirations of her supporters that were shattered.

How did everyone get it so wrong?

Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta said she was not ready to concede, calling for more votes to be counted. “She’s not done yet,” he announced early Wednesday morning.

But Clinton soon called Trump to concede.

At the Javits Center, a mass of Democrats stood aghast on the convention center floor watching CNN and MSNBC. They cheered every time a small state was called for Clinton, but those times were few and far between. She won Colorado and Virginia, but little else that was competitive.

Instead, they watched as state after state ticked into Trump’s column, her chance of becoming the first woman president snatched away by a man caught on tape bragging about groping women, and then accused in recent weeks by a dozen of doing just that.

They filed out without ever hearing her speak.

Across town, at the Trump party, the buzz was building. It exploded when Fox News declared Ohio for Trump, the first swing state to fall. “USA!” came the chants from the crowd.

Throughout his campaign, Trump made attacks on the “dishonest media” a centerpiece of his candidacy, becoming the first major candidate to refuse to release his tax returns. He avoided holding a press conference for the final three months of his candidacy.

One thing was clear from early exit polls: the divisive contest had left many Americans deeply unsatisfied with their choice. More than three in five of those interviewed viewed Trump unfavorably, meaning many who did not approve of him voted for him anyway.

“[T]he idea of change trumped everything else,” tweeted one of Trump’s pollsters Tony Fabrizio.

Markets adjust to reality of Trump presidency

Trump’s strong showing was lifting Republicans down the ballot. In the Senate, Republicans scored a string of big victories. Sen. Marco Rubio won reelection in Florida, as did Sen. Ron Johnson in Wisconsin, Sen. Pat Toomey in Pennsylvania and Sen. Richard Burr in North Carolina, while the GOP also knocked back Democratic former Sen. Evan Bayh in Indiana. The only early loss was in Illinois, where Democratic Rep. Tammy Duckworth knocked off the incumbent.

Trump will not only take the White House in 2017 but Republicans will control both chambers of Congress, where they have an appetite to unravel much of the progressive agenda enacted over the last eight years.

The five-month campaign between Clinton and Trump had become a must-see spectacle for the nation, gripping the public consciousness and drawing record viewership to their three debates, where she was widely viewed to have outflanked him.

In the final month, Trump battled back accusations of sexual assault after a tape emerged of him bragging about groping women in early October. In characteristic style, he lashed out as his accusers — threatening to sue them in a speech at Gettysburg. Clinton called him “temperamentally unfit” for the presidency and accused him of embracing racist, xenophobic and misogynistic rhetoric.

But Clinton was weighed down by 18 months of questions about her use of a private-email server at the State Department, including an FBI investigation that seemingly concluded in July — only to reemerge with 11 days left in the campaign. She was eventually cleared — again — of criminal wrongdoing only two days before the election.

But Trump continued to cry foul about a “rigged system” tilted against his outsider candidacy, and has threatened to seek her imprisonment.

“Lock her up!” has been the signature chant as his mass rallies.

Trump struck a more conciliatory note in his speech on Wednesday, speaking of how it was time to “bind the wounds of division.”

His upset victory is already sending shockwaves through financial markets. His idiosyncratic foreign policy views and his belief that the United States must be “unpredictable” in international affairs has sewn anxiety among allies and enemies alike. His regular compliments of Russian President Vladimir Putin have caused jitters across eastern Europe, ever-worried about Russian aggression.

“While we will always put America’s interests first, we will deal fairly with everyone,” Trump said.

This article tagged under:
  • Hillary Clinton
  • Elections
  • Donald Trump
  • Donald Trump 2020
  • 2016 Elections
  • Hillary Clinton 2016
  • Florida 2016
  • North Carolina 2016
  • Ohio 2016
  • Pennsylvania 2016
  • Donald Trump 2016
  • Battlegrounds
  • President Donald Trump

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If Mr Trump wins, we could be looking at the least amount of money spent by a winning candidate for some time.

Federal Election Commission records show he spent $91m (£69m) up to 22 July, of which $50m is his own money.

No other candidate since Al Gore in 2000 ($126m) has spent as little. Hillary Clinton is on some $275m so far, by the way.

Of course, Mr Trump could break out the chequebook given that he has more campaigning to do between now and November, but it looks likely he will come a long way under what Barack Obama spent last time round - almost $556m.


Primary process

Both the Democratic and Republican parties, as well as third parties such as the Green and Libertarian parties, held a series of presidential primary elections and caucuses that took place between February and June 2016, staggered among the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. This nominating process was also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots for a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who in turn elected their party's presidential nominee.

Speculation about the 2016 campaign began almost immediately following the 2012 campaign, with New York magazine declaring that the race had begun in an article published on November 8, two days after the 2012 election. On the same day, Politico released an article predicting that the 2016 general election would be between Clinton and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, while an article in The New York Times named New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and Senator Cory Booker from New Jersey as potential candidates.


Contents

Candidates

Nominee

Withdrew During the Primaries

Withdrew Before the Primaries

Primaries

Vice Presidential Selection

Nominee

In April 2016, the Obama campaign began to compile 15 to 20 individuals to vet for the position of running mate. Elizabeth Warren was the media frontrunner for the position, but the Obama campaign looked at multiple candidates. The top priorities for Obama was a candidate who could appeal to the progressive branch of the party without scaring moderate voters, with the ideal method being socially and economically liberal. Experience and identity strengths were also a priority. According to inside sources, the top candidates that Obama had narrowed down were Warren and Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio. Manchin, Congresswoman and future Secretary of Defense Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, and Congressman and future HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra of California were also considered.

On July 22, Obama announced in a press release that he had chosen Warren as his running mate. She would be the second woman to be on a presidential ticket of a major party, and the first on the Democratic ticket. Warren was described as the right combination of all that Obama sought in a running mate. Despite the heated primary contest, Obama and Warren worked amicably together on the campaign trail. The Obama/Warren ticket would go on to win the election, making Warren the first woman vice president in United States history.


The Most 'Unprecedented' Election Ever? 65 Ways It Has Been

Hillary Clinton, heartened by her supporters' reception, after voting on the June 7th, the night it became clear she would be the first woman nominee of a major-party ticket. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

Hillary Clinton, heartened by her supporters' reception, after voting on the June 7th, the night it became clear she would be the first woman nominee of a major-party ticket.

Every presidential election manages to feel new somehow. Even amid the wall-to-wall cable coverage and poll frenzies and day-before-the-election, man-on-the-street interviews with still-undecided voters and shock (shock!) when a candidate flip-flops, every four years, there's a sense that this time — this time — is different. (Remember that whole recount thing?)

So much of this election feels so entirely off the map — "unprecedented," as it is called in one story after another. So we wondered just how unprecedented it is. A few Nexis searches later, the answer is: very.

Trump fields a question during the first Republican presidential debate hosted by Fox News. That debate pulled in 24 million viewers, the largest ever for a presidential primary debate. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

Trump fields a question during the first Republican presidential debate hosted by Fox News. That debate pulled in 24 million viewers, the largest ever for a presidential primary debate.

We've assembled a rundown of ways in which 2016 presidential election could be called "unprecedented." You can pull a few lessons from the following list — maybe simply that we journalists could occasionally use a thesaurus. But it's also a story of how Trump blew up the whole election season. Back in 2014, the potential for yet another Bush to enter the White House seemed like big news. That seems quaint at this point.

In addition, the list is an entertaining (if abridged) history of the most memorable bits of Campaign 2016, as well as a reminder that this election cycle just might deserve its own, surreal chapter in our kids' American History textbooks.

2014

1. Clinton's early, organized support — "Each group's early efforts are unprecedented — especially considering Clinton has yet to announce her presidential intentions — causing some senior Democrats to worry that focusing on 2016 is taking Democrats' focus off the 2014 midterms with the balance of power in the Senate at stake." — Feb. 26, 2014, CNN, "Groups Unite to Back Hillary Clinton"

Politics

The 270 Project: Try To Predict Who Will Win The Election

Politics

Celebrities, Lies And Outsiders: How This Election Surprised One Political Scientist

2. Iowa GOP pledges to remain neutral — "The move is 'unprecedented and is intended to send a clear signal to potential presidential candidates: All are welcome in Iowa, and the caucus process will be a fair and impartial one,'" a news release said Wednesday. — Dec. 3, 2014, Des Moines Register.

3. A potentially growing Bush dynasty — "Former governor Jeb Bush of Florida announced Tuesday that he is exploring a run for president, a move that could dramatically reshape the Republican primary and put his family in line for an unprecedented third member in the White House." — Dec. 17, 2014, Boston Globe.

2015

4. Clinton's early endorsement primary lead — "Hillary Clinton had a commanding lead in endorsements even before launching her campaign — to an extent that's unprecedented for a non-incumbent Democrat." — FiveThirtyEight

5. Clinton's experience — "She boasts an unprecedented resume — former first lady, New York senator, secretary of State — and enjoys universal name recognition after more than two decades of near-constant presence on the national stage." — April 11, 2015, Los Angeles Times

6. The massive GOP field — "'This event is unprecedented,' said Steve Duprey, a Republican national committeeman from New Hampshire. 'There are so many presidential candidates because this time it is an open seat, and there is no heir apparent.'" — April 18, 2015, Boston Globe (Many outlets were careful to stress it was the biggest field in the "modern" political era.)

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor, raked in more money at an earlier point than any Republican candidate. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor, raked in more money at an earlier point than any Republican candidate.

7. Bush's incredible fundraising — "Jeb Bush's team announced that he had raised $114 million - an extraordinary and unprecedented haul this early in a presidential campaign and one more signal of a candidate who is building for the long haul." — July 12, 2015, Washington Post

8. The dominance of outside spending — "The 2016 elections are now poised to mark a tipping point: the first time outside groups outstrip the clout and resources of many campaigns. 'It's pretty clear that the superPACs are playing an unprecedented role,' said Michael Malbin, executive director of the nonpartisan Campaign Finance Institute, which tracks political contributions." — July 16, 2015, Washington Post

9. Clinton's early Latino outreach — "Clinton's massive Latino outreach machine is unprecedented for this stage in a primary campaign. Most Latinos don't even know the name of Clinton's closest challenger for the Democratic nomination, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, according a new Univision poll." — July 19, 2015, Los Angeles Times

10. The tiny but powerful community of political donors — "Fewer than 400 families are responsible for almost half the money raised in the 2016 presidential campaign, a concentration of political donors that is unprecedented in the modern era." — Aug. 1, 2015, New York Times

11. Fox News debate viewership — "Trump has been a huge benefit to Republicans in some ways, bringing an unprecedented amount of attention to the first presidential primary debate last week. Some 24 million Americans tuned in to watch, more than most big-time sporting events, demonstrating a clear curiosity about Trump's campaign but also giving the other candidates an opportunity to showcase their own views." — Aug. 9, 2015, Boston Globe

Politics

Trump Calls To Ban Immigration From Countries With 'Proven History Of Terrorism'

Politics

Paul Ryan: Trump's Muslim Ban Not Reflective Of GOP And U.S. Principles

12. A social-media-heavy election — "Early campaigning on social media has never been so intense, with candidates turning to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to engage supporters who are getting unprecedented access to White House hopefuls. 'Now, candidates have a presence on a whole breadth of platforms with custom content to target that audience, and they are producing unprecedented levels of content — the sheer volume is impressive,' said Marie Ewald Danzig, head of creative and delivery at Blue State Digital." — Sept. 13, 2015, AdWeek

13. Hispanic conservatives meet to talk about what to do about Trump — "Months since Donald Trump sparked outrage with his comments about Mexican immigrants, about two dozen of the nation's top Hispanic conservative activists are joining forces to respond and issue a warning to the Republican Party. The activists plan to meet on Oct. 27 in Boulder, Colo., the day before GOP presidential candidates meet in the same city for a debate hosted by CNBC. Plans for the 'unprecedented gathering' have been in the works for several weeks. " – Oct. 22, 2015, Washington Post

14. Trump's call for a Muslim ban — "A prohibition of Muslims — an unprecedented proposal by a leading American presidential candidate, and an idea more typically associated with hate groups — reflects a progression of mistrust that is rooted in ideology as much as politics." — Dec. 10, 2015, New York Times (However, as the Times also pointed out: "While Muslims have not been the targets of such policies in the United States, the sentiment of keeping certain kinds of people out of the country is not unprecedented in American history.")

15. Polling mania — "Polling of Republicans in the early-voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina has reached unprecedented levels, fueled by the number of candidates in the hunt and an obsession with the horse race rather than a meaningful debate over policy, a new Boston Globe study says." — Dec. 31, 2015, New York Times

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-V.t, right, speaks as Hillary Clinton looks on during an April Democratic debate in New York. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-V.t, right, speaks as Hillary Clinton looks on during an April Democratic debate in New York.

2016

16. Planned Parenthood's early Clinton endorsement — "Planned Parenthood will make unprecedented primary endorsement of Hillary Clinton. . The endorsement marks the first time in the organization's 100-year history that Planned Parenthood Action Fund has endorsed a candidate in a primary." — Jan. 7, 2016, Washington Post

17. The splintered GOP — "Dirksen Congressional Leadership Research Center Archivist Frank Mackaman, a lifelong student of government, says the presidential race America is witnessing right now is 'virtually unprecedented.' 'I suppose you would have to go back to the Bull Moose (Progressive) Party, Teddy Roosevelt's splinter from the Republican Party in the early 20th Century, to get something that resembles what we're going through now — especially on the Republican side.'" — Jan. 25, 2016, Pekin Daily Times

18. Trump refusing to debate unless Fox host is removed -- "Trump, of course, decided to pull out after the network refused to capitulate to his unprecedented demand that Megyn Kelly be removed as moderator." – Jan. 27, 2016, Vanity Fair

19. Latino outreach in Iowa — "Advocacy groups have launched unprecedented voter registration efforts aimed at the state's small but rapidly growing Latino population." — Jan. 27, 2016, Los Angeles Times

20. The lack of GOP party leadership support for a potential nominee: "[I]t's astonishing that the real estate developer and reality TV star could be so far ahead in the polls this close to voting, yet still so far behind presidential rivals like former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in the congressional endorsement competition. 'The gap between Trump's standing and at least his elite support is unprecedented,' University of Maryland Professor David Karol told HuffPost on Tuesday. Karol is a co-author of The Party Decides, which in part studies the power of endorsements before and after the party electing reforms of the 1970s." — Jan. 27, 2016, Huffington Post

Fox News' Megyn Kelly in New York in May, weeks before Trump would appear on her show. That appearance was something of a detente after Trump had demanded she be removed from moderating a debate. Victoria Will/Victoria Will/Invision/AP hide caption

Fox News' Megyn Kelly in New York in May, weeks before Trump would appear on her show. That appearance was something of a detente after Trump had demanded she be removed from moderating a debate.

Victoria Will/Victoria Will/Invision/AP

21. Religious Republicans' embrace of Trump — "Sixty-one percent of GOP and GOP-leaning voters who say it's important to have a president who shares their religious beliefs say that Trump would be a good or great president, compared with 46 percent of GOP voters who say the religiosity of the president isn't as important. The share of Republican voters who think that Trump would be a good president is the same among churchgoing and less-churchgoing Republicans. The findings about Trump are unprecedented, say Pew pollsters and other experts." — Jan. 28, 2016, Washington Post

22. Trump's reenactment of Ben Carson's youth stabbing story — "Mr. Carson's bootstrapping story and brief lead in the Iowa polls last year produced a squabble almost certainly unprecedented in modern politics: Mr. Trump insisting, through public re-enactment, that Mr. Carson could not possibly have stabbed a peer in his youth. Mr. Carson was guilty, his rival insisted, of being innocent." — Feb. 2, 2016, New York Times

23. Youth engagement — "A new survey that captures the attitudes of 2015 college freshmen shows unprecedented levels of interest in both political engagement and student activism, underscoring the youth vote's potential to reshape the electoral landscape." — Feb. 11, 2016, FiveThirtyEight

Politics

Inside Trump's Closed-Door Meeting, Held To Reassure 'The Evangelicals'

Politics

As Trump Defies Expectations Of Faith, Might We Be Entering A New Era?

24. Donald Trump vs. the Pope — "When two of the most visible figures on the international stage, Pope Francis and Donald Trump, exchanged sharp words over immigration Thursday, an extraordinary election year took another dramatic twist. The long-distance volley, impelled, like so much of the campaign, by Trump's language on Mexican immigration, created a moment that actually merited the overused label 'unprecedented.'" — Feb. 18, 2016, Los Angeles Times

25. GOP turnout in many Super Tuesday states — "Republicans voted in unprecedented numbers on Super Tuesday, setting record numbers in contests throughout different regions of the country." — March 2, 2016, CNN

26. Romney's attacks against Trump — "Romney's remarks are unprecedented in the way he — the party's most recent presidential nominee — attacks the man who seems on track to secure this year's GOP nomination." — NPR, March 3, 2016

27. Republicans' unease with Democrats — "Such uneasiness motivated two longtime Clinton confidants, pollster Stan Greenberg and strategist James Carville, to take a deep dive into the zeitgeist fueling Trump's rise. They released poll findings last week that suggested the Republican electorate has unprecedented anger with the Democratic Party, with nearly 90 percent feeling its policies are so misguided that they threaten the nation's well-being." — March 2, 2016, Los Angeles Times

28. The debate discussion of Trump's manhood — "Trump's remarks, likely unprecedented in a US presidential debate, appeared as the nadir of a campaign season already notable for its unruly, coarse tone." — March 4, 2016, AFP (It may be new in debates, but as Joseph Cummins wrote at Politico earlier this year, sexual innuendo has long been a part of presidential campaigns.)

29. John Oliver's anti-Trump rant — "Front-runner Donald Trump was recently the target of a harsh, unprecedented 22-minute monologue by HBO's John Oliver, who uncovered Trump's ancestral name and urged viewers to 'Make Donald Drumpf Again'." — March 8, 2016, Washington Post

30. Trump's potential conflicts of interest — "'This is certainly going to present an unprecedented ethical dilemma if Trump wins,' said Kenneth Gross, a partner at Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom, who provided legal assistance to several presidential candidates during their campaigns. 'He can't just get amnesia. He's stuck with the knowledge of what he owns.'" — March 16, 2016, CNN Wires

31. Trump's access to the airwaves — "Two network sources also confirmed the unprecedented control the television networks have surrendered to Trump in a series of private negotiations, allowing him to dictate specific details about placement of cameras at his event, to ensure coverage consists primarily of a single shot of his face." — March 18, 2016, Buzzfeed

Politics

Campaign Finance Report: Trump Does A Lot Of Mixing Business With Politics

Politics

Report: Partisan Bad Blood Highest In Decades

32. AIPAC's reaction to Trump's speech — "AIPAC's Apology For Trump Speech Is Unprecedented' — March 22, 2016, Washington Post

33. Voter registration in New York — "More than 20,000 first-time voters have registered with New York state in what state officials are calling an 'unprecedented surge' of voter interest ahead of the state's April 19 presidential primary." — March 22, 2016, AP

34. Utah voter turnout — "Utah residents are turning out in unprecedented numbers at presidential caucuses, creating major delays for voters and even leading some sites to run out of ballots." — March 22, 2016, AP

35. Rubio's decision to hold onto his delegates — "Marco Rubio's Unprecedented Plan To Stop Donald Trump: Keep His Delegates" — March 30, 2016, USA Today

36. The potential fallout from Trump's border wall — "Donald Trump says he would force Mexico to pay for a border wall as president by threatening to cut off the flow of billions of dollars in payments that immigrants send home to the country, an idea that could decimate the Mexican economy and set up an unprecedented showdown between the United States and a key regional ally." — April 5, 2016, Washington Post

37. Anti-Trump advertising — "'What is unusual and unprecedented is the array of advertisers who are out there flogging Trump on the air,' said Elizabeth Wilner, a senior vice president at Kantar Media/CMAG." — April 12, 2016, New York Times

38. Outreach to Asian-American voters — "'It's going to be close, and I think the candidates know that. That's why they have this sort of unprecedented outreach to communities like the Asian-American community,' said [Jerry] Vattamala [who runs the country's largest exit poll of Asian-American voters for the Asian-American Legal Defense and Education Fund]. — April 18, 2016, NPR

39. Two super-unpopular candidates — "'This is unprecedented,' said Democratic pollster Mark Mellman. 'It will be the first time in the history of polling that we'll have both major party candidates disliked by a majority of the American people going into the election.'" — April 19, 2016, Washington Post

40. The Kasich-Cruz pact — "The Texas senator and Ohio governor announced an unprecedented deal in which Kasich will not contest Indiana while Cruz will steer clear of Oregon and New Mexico to maximize chances to beating Trump in each state and denying him the 1,237 delegates he needs to secure the Republican nomination that he seems sure to lose if he can't claim it on the first ballot at the Republican National Convention in July." — April 24, 2016, Washington Examiner

41. Cruz picks Fiorina as his running mate — "He acknowledged his decision to name a running mate now was an unorthodox and unprecedented move, but that 'all of us can acknowledge that this race, if anything, is unusual.'" — April 27, 2016, NPR

42. Clinton fundraising vehicle — "In the days before Hillary Clinton launched an unprecedented big-money fundraising vehicle with state parties last summer, she vowed 'to rebuild our party from the ground up,' proclaiming 'when our state parties are strong, we win. That's what will happen.' But less than 1 percent of the $61 million raised by that effort has stayed in the state parties' coffers. " — May 2, 2016, Politico

43. Trump's potential effect on down-ballot races — "'We can say it makes it harder for Republicans, but we can also say that this kind of election is unprecedented,' Ms. Duffy said. 'Nothing that we have known about politics has been true this cycle.'" — May 5, 2016, Wall Street Journal


Memorable Elections

Donald Trump became the fifth president to win despite losing the popular vote in 2016, joining the ranks of George W. Bush (2000)—who didn’t win until the U.S. Supreme Court ruled a Florida recount to be unconstitutional Benjamin Harrison (1888) Rutherford B. Hayes (1876), who moved to the White House only after a controversial electoral commission helped him overcome a massive popular-vote deficit in 1877 and John Quincy Adams, whose 1824 election was the first year the popular vote was counted. 

These presidents aren’t alone in unusual election stories Harry S. Truman won in 1948 despite the publication of a newspaper that announced otherwise. Here are some of the United States’ most memorable presidential elections.

Candidates: Hillary Clinton (Democrat), Donald Trump (Republican), Jill Stein (Green Party), Gary Johnson (Libertarian)
Winner: Donald Trump
Popular Vote: 65,844,610 (Clinton) to 62,979,636 (Trump)
Electoral College: 227 (Clinton) to 304 (Trump)

  • The 2016 election was one of five elections in U.S. history in which the winner of the electoral votes did not carry the popular vote.
  • Hillary Clinton was the first woman to win the presidential nomination of a major party.
  • Trump was the first president in more than 60 years with no experience serving in Congress or as a governor (the only others were Dwight Eisenhower and Herbert Hoover).
  • At the age of 70, Trump was the oldest president in U.S. history (Ronald Reagan was 69 when he was sworn in).
  • "Lock her up" and The Clinton email scandal: Clinton’s opponents, referring to her as 𠇌rooked Hillary,” watched carefully as the FBI investigated Clinton’s possible improper use of her personal email server during her time as secretary of state. The FBI concluded in July 2016 that no charges should be made in the case. But days before the election, FBI Director James Comey informed Congress the FBI was investigating more Clinton emails. On November 6, two days before the election, Comey reported to Congress that the additional emails did not change the agency’s prior report.
  • Historic upset: In the days leading up to Election Day, Clinton led in nearly all polls. According to exit polls, however, Trump won thanks to his ability to consolidate the support of white voters and lower-income groups.
  • The Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a report in January 2017 concluding that the Russians interfered with the election. Trump fired former FBI Director James Comey. Then former FBI director Robert Mueller was appointed as special counsel to investigate possible collusion between Russia and Trump’s campaign.
  • Mueller submitted his report to the Justice Department in March 2019, finding no evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, but concluding Russian interference occurred "in sweeping and systematic fashion." 

Candidates: Al Gore (Democrat), George W. Bush (Republican), Ralph Nader (Green Party), Patrick Buchanan (conservative populist), Harry Browne (Libertarian)
Winner: George W. Bush
Popular Vote: 50,996,582 (Gore) to 50, 465,062 (Bush)
Electoral College: 271 (Bush) to 266 (Gore)

  • The 2000 election was one of four elections in U.S. history in which the winner of the electoral votes did not carry the popular vote.
  • Gore conceded on election night, but retracted his concession when he learned that the vote in Florida was too close to call. A recount of the Florida votes ensued, but was eventually ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Ralph Nader has formally run for president four times the first time was in 1996. He was also a write-in candidate in 1992.

Candidates: John F. Kennedy (Democrat), Richard M. Nixon (Republican)
Winner: John F. Kennedy
Popular Vote: 34,226,731 (Kennedy) to 34,108,157 (Nixon)
Electoral College: 303 (Kennedy) to 219 (Nixon)

  • With his victory by a scant 120,000 votes, the 43-year-old Kennedy became the youngest-ever U.S. president. Nixon was 47–only four years older.
  • Voters feared that Kennedy, a Roman Catholic, might be controlled by the Catholic Church. He was the nation’s first Catholic U.S. president. (In 2009, Joe Biden became the country’s first Catholic vice president, and the third Catholic major-party presidential candidate in 2020.)
  • Kennedy’s relaxed demeanor and telegenic looks gave him the edge in four televised debates many credit these debates for his eventual victory.

Candidates: Harry S. Truman (Democrat), Thomas E. Dewey (Republican), J. Strom Thurmond (States’ Rights Democrat or 𠇍ixiecrat”), Henry Wallace (Progressive), Norman Thomas (Socialist)
Winner: Harry S. Truman
Popular Vote: 24,179,345 (Truman) to 21,991,291 (Dewey)
Electoral College: 303 (Truman) to 189 (Dewey)

  • Thomas Dewey, the governor of New York, had run for president once before, against Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1944, and lost in a close race.
  • Truman, FDR’s vice president, became president on April 12, 1945, after Roosevelt’s death.
  • Truman was seen as an underdog going into the 1948 election—so much so that the Chicago Tribune printed newspapers with the headline �wey Defeats Truman.” A picture of the victorious Truman holding the newspaper is one of the most famous photos in U.S. history.
  • Thurmond won 39 electoral votes.

Candidates: Benjamin Harrison (Republican), Grover Cleveland (Democrat), Clinton Fisk (Prohibition), Alson Streeter (Union Labor)
Winner: Benjamin Harrison
Popular Vote: 5,534,488 (Cleveland) to 5,443,892 (Harrison)
Electoral College: 233 (Harrison) to 168 (Cleveland)

  • Harrison lost the popular vote by about 90,000, but was able to win the Electoral College, thanks largely to victories in two swing states: New York and Indiana.
  • Although Grover Cleveland, the 22nd president, lost his re-election campaign in 1888 against Harrison, he returned to the White House in 1893 as the 24th president.
  • Benjamin Harrison was the grandson of President William Henry Harrison, who died of pneumonia in 1841, just one month after taking office.

Candidates: Rutherford B. Hayes (Republican), Samuel Tilden (Democrat), Peter Cooper (Greenback)
Winner: Rutherford B. Hayes
Popular Vote: 4,286,808 (Tilden) to 4,034,142 (Hayes)
Electoral College: 184 (Tilden) to 165 (Hayes)—with 20 votes disputed 185 (Hayes) to 184 (Tilden)𠅏inal tally


The Most 'Unprecedented' Election Ever? 65 Ways It Has Been

Hillary Clinton, heartened by her supporters' reception, after voting on the June 7th, the night it became clear she would be the first woman nominee of a major-party ticket. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

Hillary Clinton, heartened by her supporters' reception, after voting on the June 7th, the night it became clear she would be the first woman nominee of a major-party ticket.

Every presidential election manages to feel new somehow. Even amid the wall-to-wall cable coverage and poll frenzies and day-before-the-election, man-on-the-street interviews with still-undecided voters and shock (shock!) when a candidate flip-flops, every four years, there's a sense that this time — this time — is different. (Remember that whole recount thing?)

So much of this election feels so entirely off the map — "unprecedented," as it is called in one story after another. So we wondered just how unprecedented it is. A few Nexis searches later, the answer is: very.

Trump fields a question during the first Republican presidential debate hosted by Fox News. That debate pulled in 24 million viewers, the largest ever for a presidential primary debate. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

Trump fields a question during the first Republican presidential debate hosted by Fox News. That debate pulled in 24 million viewers, the largest ever for a presidential primary debate.

We've assembled a rundown of ways in which 2016 presidential election could be called "unprecedented." You can pull a few lessons from the following list — maybe simply that we journalists could occasionally use a thesaurus. But it's also a story of how Trump blew up the whole election season. Back in 2014, the potential for yet another Bush to enter the White House seemed like big news. That seems quaint at this point.

In addition, the list is an entertaining (if abridged) history of the most memorable bits of Campaign 2016, as well as a reminder that this election cycle just might deserve its own, surreal chapter in our kids' American History textbooks.

2014

1. Clinton's early, organized support — "Each group's early efforts are unprecedented — especially considering Clinton has yet to announce her presidential intentions — causing some senior Democrats to worry that focusing on 2016 is taking Democrats' focus off the 2014 midterms with the balance of power in the Senate at stake." — Feb. 26, 2014, CNN, "Groups Unite to Back Hillary Clinton"

Politics

The 270 Project: Try To Predict Who Will Win The Election

Politics

Celebrities, Lies And Outsiders: How This Election Surprised One Political Scientist

2. Iowa GOP pledges to remain neutral — "The move is 'unprecedented and is intended to send a clear signal to potential presidential candidates: All are welcome in Iowa, and the caucus process will be a fair and impartial one,'" a news release said Wednesday. — Dec. 3, 2014, Des Moines Register.

3. A potentially growing Bush dynasty — "Former governor Jeb Bush of Florida announced Tuesday that he is exploring a run for president, a move that could dramatically reshape the Republican primary and put his family in line for an unprecedented third member in the White House." — Dec. 17, 2014, Boston Globe.

2015

4. Clinton's early endorsement primary lead — "Hillary Clinton had a commanding lead in endorsements even before launching her campaign — to an extent that's unprecedented for a non-incumbent Democrat." — FiveThirtyEight

5. Clinton's experience — "She boasts an unprecedented resume — former first lady, New York senator, secretary of State — and enjoys universal name recognition after more than two decades of near-constant presence on the national stage." — April 11, 2015, Los Angeles Times

6. The massive GOP field — "'This event is unprecedented,' said Steve Duprey, a Republican national committeeman from New Hampshire. 'There are so many presidential candidates because this time it is an open seat, and there is no heir apparent.'" — April 18, 2015, Boston Globe (Many outlets were careful to stress it was the biggest field in the "modern" political era.)

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor, raked in more money at an earlier point than any Republican candidate. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor, raked in more money at an earlier point than any Republican candidate.

7. Bush's incredible fundraising — "Jeb Bush's team announced that he had raised $114 million - an extraordinary and unprecedented haul this early in a presidential campaign and one more signal of a candidate who is building for the long haul." — July 12, 2015, Washington Post

8. The dominance of outside spending — "The 2016 elections are now poised to mark a tipping point: the first time outside groups outstrip the clout and resources of many campaigns. 'It's pretty clear that the superPACs are playing an unprecedented role,' said Michael Malbin, executive director of the nonpartisan Campaign Finance Institute, which tracks political contributions." — July 16, 2015, Washington Post

9. Clinton's early Latino outreach — "Clinton's massive Latino outreach machine is unprecedented for this stage in a primary campaign. Most Latinos don't even know the name of Clinton's closest challenger for the Democratic nomination, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, according a new Univision poll." — July 19, 2015, Los Angeles Times

10. The tiny but powerful community of political donors — "Fewer than 400 families are responsible for almost half the money raised in the 2016 presidential campaign, a concentration of political donors that is unprecedented in the modern era." — Aug. 1, 2015, New York Times

11. Fox News debate viewership — "Trump has been a huge benefit to Republicans in some ways, bringing an unprecedented amount of attention to the first presidential primary debate last week. Some 24 million Americans tuned in to watch, more than most big-time sporting events, demonstrating a clear curiosity about Trump's campaign but also giving the other candidates an opportunity to showcase their own views." — Aug. 9, 2015, Boston Globe

Politics

Trump Calls To Ban Immigration From Countries With 'Proven History Of Terrorism'

Politics

Paul Ryan: Trump's Muslim Ban Not Reflective Of GOP And U.S. Principles

12. A social-media-heavy election — "Early campaigning on social media has never been so intense, with candidates turning to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to engage supporters who are getting unprecedented access to White House hopefuls. 'Now, candidates have a presence on a whole breadth of platforms with custom content to target that audience, and they are producing unprecedented levels of content — the sheer volume is impressive,' said Marie Ewald Danzig, head of creative and delivery at Blue State Digital." — Sept. 13, 2015, AdWeek

13. Hispanic conservatives meet to talk about what to do about Trump — "Months since Donald Trump sparked outrage with his comments about Mexican immigrants, about two dozen of the nation's top Hispanic conservative activists are joining forces to respond and issue a warning to the Republican Party. The activists plan to meet on Oct. 27 in Boulder, Colo., the day before GOP presidential candidates meet in the same city for a debate hosted by CNBC. Plans for the 'unprecedented gathering' have been in the works for several weeks. " – Oct. 22, 2015, Washington Post

14. Trump's call for a Muslim ban — "A prohibition of Muslims — an unprecedented proposal by a leading American presidential candidate, and an idea more typically associated with hate groups — reflects a progression of mistrust that is rooted in ideology as much as politics." — Dec. 10, 2015, New York Times (However, as the Times also pointed out: "While Muslims have not been the targets of such policies in the United States, the sentiment of keeping certain kinds of people out of the country is not unprecedented in American history.")

15. Polling mania — "Polling of Republicans in the early-voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina has reached unprecedented levels, fueled by the number of candidates in the hunt and an obsession with the horse race rather than a meaningful debate over policy, a new Boston Globe study says." — Dec. 31, 2015, New York Times

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-V.t, right, speaks as Hillary Clinton looks on during an April Democratic debate in New York. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-V.t, right, speaks as Hillary Clinton looks on during an April Democratic debate in New York.

2016

16. Planned Parenthood's early Clinton endorsement — "Planned Parenthood will make unprecedented primary endorsement of Hillary Clinton. . The endorsement marks the first time in the organization's 100-year history that Planned Parenthood Action Fund has endorsed a candidate in a primary." — Jan. 7, 2016, Washington Post

17. The splintered GOP — "Dirksen Congressional Leadership Research Center Archivist Frank Mackaman, a lifelong student of government, says the presidential race America is witnessing right now is 'virtually unprecedented.' 'I suppose you would have to go back to the Bull Moose (Progressive) Party, Teddy Roosevelt's splinter from the Republican Party in the early 20th Century, to get something that resembles what we're going through now — especially on the Republican side.'" — Jan. 25, 2016, Pekin Daily Times

18. Trump refusing to debate unless Fox host is removed -- "Trump, of course, decided to pull out after the network refused to capitulate to his unprecedented demand that Megyn Kelly be removed as moderator." – Jan. 27, 2016, Vanity Fair

19. Latino outreach in Iowa — "Advocacy groups have launched unprecedented voter registration efforts aimed at the state's small but rapidly growing Latino population." — Jan. 27, 2016, Los Angeles Times

20. The lack of GOP party leadership support for a potential nominee: "[I]t's astonishing that the real estate developer and reality TV star could be so far ahead in the polls this close to voting, yet still so far behind presidential rivals like former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in the congressional endorsement competition. 'The gap between Trump's standing and at least his elite support is unprecedented,' University of Maryland Professor David Karol told HuffPost on Tuesday. Karol is a co-author of The Party Decides, which in part studies the power of endorsements before and after the party electing reforms of the 1970s." — Jan. 27, 2016, Huffington Post

Fox News' Megyn Kelly in New York in May, weeks before Trump would appear on her show. That appearance was something of a detente after Trump had demanded she be removed from moderating a debate. Victoria Will/Victoria Will/Invision/AP hide caption

Fox News' Megyn Kelly in New York in May, weeks before Trump would appear on her show. That appearance was something of a detente after Trump had demanded she be removed from moderating a debate.

Victoria Will/Victoria Will/Invision/AP

21. Religious Republicans' embrace of Trump — "Sixty-one percent of GOP and GOP-leaning voters who say it's important to have a president who shares their religious beliefs say that Trump would be a good or great president, compared with 46 percent of GOP voters who say the religiosity of the president isn't as important. The share of Republican voters who think that Trump would be a good president is the same among churchgoing and less-churchgoing Republicans. The findings about Trump are unprecedented, say Pew pollsters and other experts." — Jan. 28, 2016, Washington Post

22. Trump's reenactment of Ben Carson's youth stabbing story — "Mr. Carson's bootstrapping story and brief lead in the Iowa polls last year produced a squabble almost certainly unprecedented in modern politics: Mr. Trump insisting, through public re-enactment, that Mr. Carson could not possibly have stabbed a peer in his youth. Mr. Carson was guilty, his rival insisted, of being innocent." — Feb. 2, 2016, New York Times

23. Youth engagement — "A new survey that captures the attitudes of 2015 college freshmen shows unprecedented levels of interest in both political engagement and student activism, underscoring the youth vote's potential to reshape the electoral landscape." — Feb. 11, 2016, FiveThirtyEight

Politics

Inside Trump's Closed-Door Meeting, Held To Reassure 'The Evangelicals'

Politics

As Trump Defies Expectations Of Faith, Might We Be Entering A New Era?

24. Donald Trump vs. the Pope — "When two of the most visible figures on the international stage, Pope Francis and Donald Trump, exchanged sharp words over immigration Thursday, an extraordinary election year took another dramatic twist. The long-distance volley, impelled, like so much of the campaign, by Trump's language on Mexican immigration, created a moment that actually merited the overused label 'unprecedented.'" — Feb. 18, 2016, Los Angeles Times

25. GOP turnout in many Super Tuesday states — "Republicans voted in unprecedented numbers on Super Tuesday, setting record numbers in contests throughout different regions of the country." — March 2, 2016, CNN

26. Romney's attacks against Trump — "Romney's remarks are unprecedented in the way he — the party's most recent presidential nominee — attacks the man who seems on track to secure this year's GOP nomination." — NPR, March 3, 2016

27. Republicans' unease with Democrats — "Such uneasiness motivated two longtime Clinton confidants, pollster Stan Greenberg and strategist James Carville, to take a deep dive into the zeitgeist fueling Trump's rise. They released poll findings last week that suggested the Republican electorate has unprecedented anger with the Democratic Party, with nearly 90 percent feeling its policies are so misguided that they threaten the nation's well-being." — March 2, 2016, Los Angeles Times

28. The debate discussion of Trump's manhood — "Trump's remarks, likely unprecedented in a US presidential debate, appeared as the nadir of a campaign season already notable for its unruly, coarse tone." — March 4, 2016, AFP (It may be new in debates, but as Joseph Cummins wrote at Politico earlier this year, sexual innuendo has long been a part of presidential campaigns.)

29. John Oliver's anti-Trump rant — "Front-runner Donald Trump was recently the target of a harsh, unprecedented 22-minute monologue by HBO's John Oliver, who uncovered Trump's ancestral name and urged viewers to 'Make Donald Drumpf Again'." — March 8, 2016, Washington Post

30. Trump's potential conflicts of interest — "'This is certainly going to present an unprecedented ethical dilemma if Trump wins,' said Kenneth Gross, a partner at Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom, who provided legal assistance to several presidential candidates during their campaigns. 'He can't just get amnesia. He's stuck with the knowledge of what he owns.'" — March 16, 2016, CNN Wires

31. Trump's access to the airwaves — "Two network sources also confirmed the unprecedented control the television networks have surrendered to Trump in a series of private negotiations, allowing him to dictate specific details about placement of cameras at his event, to ensure coverage consists primarily of a single shot of his face." — March 18, 2016, Buzzfeed

Politics

Campaign Finance Report: Trump Does A Lot Of Mixing Business With Politics

Politics

Report: Partisan Bad Blood Highest In Decades

32. AIPAC's reaction to Trump's speech — "AIPAC's Apology For Trump Speech Is Unprecedented' — March 22, 2016, Washington Post

33. Voter registration in New York — "More than 20,000 first-time voters have registered with New York state in what state officials are calling an 'unprecedented surge' of voter interest ahead of the state's April 19 presidential primary." — March 22, 2016, AP

34. Utah voter turnout — "Utah residents are turning out in unprecedented numbers at presidential caucuses, creating major delays for voters and even leading some sites to run out of ballots." — March 22, 2016, AP

35. Rubio's decision to hold onto his delegates — "Marco Rubio's Unprecedented Plan To Stop Donald Trump: Keep His Delegates" — March 30, 2016, USA Today

36. The potential fallout from Trump's border wall — "Donald Trump says he would force Mexico to pay for a border wall as president by threatening to cut off the flow of billions of dollars in payments that immigrants send home to the country, an idea that could decimate the Mexican economy and set up an unprecedented showdown between the United States and a key regional ally." — April 5, 2016, Washington Post

37. Anti-Trump advertising — "'What is unusual and unprecedented is the array of advertisers who are out there flogging Trump on the air,' said Elizabeth Wilner, a senior vice president at Kantar Media/CMAG." — April 12, 2016, New York Times

38. Outreach to Asian-American voters — "'It's going to be close, and I think the candidates know that. That's why they have this sort of unprecedented outreach to communities like the Asian-American community,' said [Jerry] Vattamala [who runs the country's largest exit poll of Asian-American voters for the Asian-American Legal Defense and Education Fund]. — April 18, 2016, NPR

39. Two super-unpopular candidates — "'This is unprecedented,' said Democratic pollster Mark Mellman. 'It will be the first time in the history of polling that we'll have both major party candidates disliked by a majority of the American people going into the election.'" — April 19, 2016, Washington Post

40. The Kasich-Cruz pact — "The Texas senator and Ohio governor announced an unprecedented deal in which Kasich will not contest Indiana while Cruz will steer clear of Oregon and New Mexico to maximize chances to beating Trump in each state and denying him the 1,237 delegates he needs to secure the Republican nomination that he seems sure to lose if he can't claim it on the first ballot at the Republican National Convention in July." — April 24, 2016, Washington Examiner

41. Cruz picks Fiorina as his running mate — "He acknowledged his decision to name a running mate now was an unorthodox and unprecedented move, but that 'all of us can acknowledge that this race, if anything, is unusual.'" — April 27, 2016, NPR

42. Clinton fundraising vehicle — "In the days before Hillary Clinton launched an unprecedented big-money fundraising vehicle with state parties last summer, she vowed 'to rebuild our party from the ground up,' proclaiming 'when our state parties are strong, we win. That's what will happen.' But less than 1 percent of the $61 million raised by that effort has stayed in the state parties' coffers. " — May 2, 2016, Politico

43. Trump's potential effect on down-ballot races — "'We can say it makes it harder for Republicans, but we can also say that this kind of election is unprecedented,' Ms. Duffy said. 'Nothing that we have known about politics has been true this cycle.'" — May 5, 2016, Wall Street Journal


2000: The hanging chads

In 2000, many states were still using the punch card ballot, a voting system created in the 1960s. Even though these ballots had a long history of machine malfunctions and missed votes, no one seemed to know or care – until all Americans suddenly realized that the outdated technology had created a problem in Florida.

Then, on Election Day, the national media discovered that a “butterfly ballot,” a punch card ballot with a design that violated Florida state law, had confused thousands of voters in Palm Beach County.

The Florida butterfly ballot confused a number of voters, who ended up voting for Reform Party candidate Pat Buchanan thinking they had voted for Democratic candidate Al Gore. (Wikimedia Commons)

Many who had thought they were voting for Gore unknowingly voted for another candidate or voted for two candidates. (For example, Reform Party candidate Pat Buchanan received about 3,000 votes from voters who had probably intended to vote for Gore.) Gore ended up losing the state to Bush by 537 votes – and, in losing Florida, lost the election.

But ultimately, the month-long process to determine the winner of the presidential election came down to an issue of “hanging chads.”

Over 60,000 ballots in Florida, most of them on punch cards, had registered no vote for president on the punch card readers. But on many of the punch cards, the little pieces of paper that get punched out when someone votes – known as chads – were still hanging by one, two or three corners and had gone uncounted. Gore went to court to have those ballots counted by hand to try to determine voter intent, as allowed by state law. Bush fought Gore’s request in court. While Gore won in the Florida State Supreme Court, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled at 10 p.m. on Dec. 12 that Congress had set a deadline of that date for states to choose electors, so there was no more time to count votes.

The national drama and trauma that followed Election Day in 2000 (and in 1876) may not repeat this year. Of course, a lot will depend on the margins and how the candidates react.

Most eyes will be on Trump, whose threats over legal action loom over the nation.


This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


Watch the video: Είμαι βαθύτατα συγκινημένη. Το ΑΚΕΛ είναι μια ιστορική παράταξη.


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