Wellington's Peninsular War Generals and Their Battles, A Biographical and Historical Dictionary, T. A. Heathcote

Wellington's Peninsular War Generals and Their Battles, A Biographical and Historical Dictionary, T. A. Heathcote


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Wellington's Peninsular War Generals and Their Battles, A Biographical and Historical Dictionary, T. Heathcote

Wellington's Peninsular War Generals & Their Battles, A Biographical and Historical Dictionary, T. Heathcote

Despite his own less than complementary comments on their abilities, the Duke of Wellington actually was supported by a very capable band of generals during his long campaigns in Spain and Portugal. This volume presents biographies of forty-one of those subordinates, including divisional commanders, staff officers and two members of the support staff.

This book is designed to be used as a reference work, to be dipped in at need, rather than as a text to be read from end-to-end. As a result the biographies are largely independent of each other, with a certain amount of unavoidable repetition. Having said that, one of the key impressions one gets from this book is that Wellington's generals often had very varied careers, serving in far flung theatres of war, from the West Indies to India. This is best illustrated by the thirty-five articles on those battles and campaigns that involved at least five of the men covered. This section starts with the early campaigns in the Low Countries in 1793-96, but then expands out to include campaigns in Egypt, South America, Denmark and the Baltic as well as the more familiar battles of the Peninsular War.

This is a useful reference work, bringing together an interesting selection of biographies that allow the reader to gain a better understanding of the types of men who served under Wellington and their wide range of experiences.

Chapters
The Biographies (41 sub-chapters)
The Battles (35 sub-chapters)
Army Seniority List

Author: T. Heathcote
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 189
Publisher: Pen & Sword Military
Year: 2010



Wellington's Peninsular War Generals and Their Battles, A Biographical and Historical Dictionary, T. A. Heathcote - History

+£4.50 UK Delivery or free UK delivery if order is over £35
(click here for international delivery rates)

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Other formats available - Buy the Hardback and get the eBook for free! Price
Wellington's Peninsular War Generals… ePub (1.7 MB) Add to Basket £4.99
Wellington's Peninsular War Generals… Kindle (3.4 MB) Add to Basket £4.99

Wellington's achievements in the Peninsular War cannot be overestimated. At the outset in 1808 Napoleon and his Marshals appeared unstoppable. By the close Wellington and his Army had convincingly defeated the French and taken the war across the Pyrenees into France itself. He and his Generals had waged a hugely successful campaign both by conventional means and guerrilla warfare.

This book contains the pithy biographies of some forty senior officers who served Wellington, in the majority of cases, so ably during this six year war. Many had experience of battle prior to the Peninsular and went onto greater heights
thereafter. There is a section summarising the major engagements that this 'band of brothers' took part in.

The book is arranged in alphabetical order and each thoroughly researched entry places its subject's life in his historical and political context.

The result is a highly entertaining, informative and authoritative book.

Tony Heathcote was senior curator at RMA Sandhurst. His published works with Pen and Sword include The British Field Marshals, The British Admirals of the Fleet, and Nelson's Trafalgar Captains. He lives at Camberley, Surrey.

It is hoped that when this book is well received that the author and publisher will produce similar books on the remainder of Wellington’s Peninsular generals. Recommended.

The Napoleon Series - August 2010 - reviewed by Ron McGuigan

This is a thoroughly researched, well written and neatly presented work, providing a total of 41 valuable biographies. These are presented as pen portraits for less well-known commanders and fuller profiles for renowned or senior generals serving Wellington in the Peninsular War. Whether by design or chance, and we do not know from either the synopsis or introduction, the collection benefits from a review of commanding officers representing all the major arms of military service, namely: infantry, cavalry, artillery, engineers, commissariat and medical.

The Napoleon Series - September 2013 - reviewed by Anthony Gray

The book fills a vacuum in Napoleonic historiography, giving the reader a greater understanding of how dependant the best if generals is upon the quality of his staff and his field officers

Thomas Zacharis, The Napoleonic Historical Society Newsletter, Sept-Oct 2011

This book will appeal to the Napoleonic enthusiast for its detail of each general's life and has enough human interest to engage the general reader.

Wargamers, the inveterate group who follow all things military, will be interested for leads and tidbits on all of the early mediterranean, West Indian and Indian campaign in which the generals participated prior to the Peninsular campaigns.

Napoleonic Wargaming Society

TONY Heathcote’s useful volume is a companion to one on Nelson’s Trafalgar captains. He describes generals both well-known and neglected: “Black Bob” Crauford who fell storming the breach at Ciudad Rodrigo “Daddy” Hill, on whom Wellington could depend Picton urging on his “drunken set of brave rascals” the Connaught Rangers Alexander Dickson, the Duke’s invaluable chief gunner. A brief introduction explains promotion and purchase, nearly 130 pages cover 41 generals. Thirty more précis the battles and sieges. Gordon Corrigan writes a brief foreword. Those interested in Wellington’s peninsular campaigns will want this book to hand.

Soldier magazine

This book covers the lives of forty one of the best known divisional commanders, principal staff officers and heads of supporting arms and services in Wellington's Anglo-Portuguese army.
Wellington's Peninsular War Generals are widely regarded as being better subordinates than independent commanders, a perception that owes much to Wellington himself. While many of them suffered from comparison with the great man himself, this book shows that while some of his generals failed when trusted with independent commands, others did better and deserves more credit than they are often given.
All these men had an important role to play in the Allied campaign in the Peninsular theater, and the author has provided us with a concise account of their contribution to Wellington's success. Wellington's Peninsular War Generals and Their Battles is an informative and entertaining read, and will be of interest to students of the British Army in the Napoleonic Wars.

The Waterloo Journal

This is an informative and entertaining read, and will be of interest to students of the British Army in the Napoleonic Wars.

First Empire Nov/Dec 2010

Despite his own less than complementary comments on their abilities, the Duke of Wellington actually was supported by a very capable band of generals during his long campaigns in Spain and Portugal. This volume presents biographies of forty-one of those subordinates, including divisional commanders, staff officers and two members of the support staff.

This book is designed to be used as a reference work, to be dipped in at need, rather than as a text to be read from end-to-end. As a result the biographies are largely independent of each other, with a certain amount of unavoidable repetition. Having said that, one of the key impressions one gets from this book is that Wellington's generals often had very varied careers, serving in far flung theatres of war, from the West Indies to India. This is best illustrated by the thirty-five articles on those battles and campaigns that involved at least five of the men covered. This section starts with the early campaigns in the Low Countries in 1793-96, but then expands out to include campaigns in Egypt, South America, Denmark and the Baltic as well as the more familiar battles of the Peninsular War.

This is a useful reference work, bringing together an interesting selection of biographies that allow the reader to gain a better understanding of the types of men who served under Wellington and their wide range of experiences.

History of War

About Dr T A Heathcote

Tony Heathcote was the Librarian at the RMAS Sandhurst until his retirement. He has written numerous books including the two biographical dictionaries (above) both under the Pen and Sword imprint.


Hamiltons Campaign With Moore and Wellington During the Peninsular War (The Spellmount Library of Military History)

Anthony Hamilton

Published by The History Press LTD, 1998

Seller: Reuseabook, Gloucester, GLOS, United Kingdom
Contact seller

Used - Hardcover
Condition: Used Good

Hardcover. Condition: Used Good. Dispatched, from the UK, within 48 hours of ordering. This book is in good condition but will show signs of previous ownership. Please expect some creasing to the spine and/or minor damage to the cover.

More buying choices from other sellers on AbeBooks


WELLINGTON’S PENINSULAR WAR GENERALS AND THEIR BATTLES A Biographical and Historical Dictionary

Wellington’s achievements in the Peninsular War cannot be overestimated. At the outset in 1808 Napoleon and his Marshals appeared unstoppable. By the close Wellington and his Army had convincingly defeated the French and taken the war across the Pyrenees into France itself. He and his Generals had waged a hugely successful campaign both by conventional means and guerrilla warfare.

Description

This book contains the pithy biographies of some forty senior officers who served Wellington, in the majority of cases, so ably during this six-year war. Many had experience of battle prior to the Peninsular and went onto greater heights thereafter. There is a section summarising the major engagements that this ‘band of brothers’ took part in. The book is arranged in alphabetical order and each thoroughly researched entry places its subject’s life in his historical and political context. The result is a highly entertaining, informative and authoritative book. Tony Heathcote was senior curator at RMA Sandhurst. His published works include The British Field Marshals, The British Admirals of the Fleet, and Nelson’s Trafalgar Captains.


I am not indulging in that habit which is much practised by British radicals and
which Sir William Gilbert described as “ praising . There were , of course , many
thoughtful and able battalion and brigade commanders , although , as with
Wingate ' s . Wellington ' s Bob Craufurd in the Peninsular is , perhaps , the
pattern .

Author: Anthony Verrier

ISBN: UOM:39015003470005

Category: Gran Bretaña


The Field Marshals of the British Army 1736-1997. A Biographical Dictionary

T. A. Heathcote, General Sir Charles Gutherie

Published by Pen & Sword Books Ltd 01/09/1999 (1999)

From: Bahamut Media (Reading, United Kingdom)

About this Item: Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Shipped within 24 hours from our UK warehouse. Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover. Spine still tight, in very good condition. Remember if you are not happy, you are covered by our 100% money back guarantee. Seller Inventory # 6545-9780850526967


The Real Falstaff: Sir John Fastolf and the Hundred Years' War, Stephen Cooper (Pen and Sword Military, Barnsley, 2010) xiii, 210pp., hardback, £19.99, ISBN 978 1 84884 123 9.This is the first full biography of Sir John Fastolf, the famous military commander of the Hundred Years' War, on whom Shakespeare.

Children of the Labouring Poor: The working lives of children in nineteenth-century Hertfordshire, Eileen Wallace, 2010, UH Press, 192p, ISBN 978-1-905313-49-5, £14-99.This very informative and well-sourced book achieves much more than its titles infers. Eileen Wallace has researched and explored the working lives of poor children in nineteenth-century Hertfordshire in.


Foreword

The soubriquet ‘polymath’ is greatly overused–often inaccurately–but if it applies to anyone it surely does to Dr Tony Heathcote: scholar, linguist, author, historian, reserve soldier, amateur sailor and hugely knowledgeable and amusing companion. I first met Dr Heathcote when we were both at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst over thirty years ago, I as the commander of a company of my battalion lent to Sandhurst and then as the commander of Burma Company, and he as the Curator of the Sandhurst Collection. Rather in the way that the assistant cultural attaché at an embassy is more often the chief resident spy, the curatorship of the Sandhurst Collection entailed far more than responsibility for paintings and the mess silver (extensive though that was), but extended a tentacle or two into virtually every aspect of Academy life. A huge potential source of blackmail (although never used as such) was his guardianship of the personal files of everyone who had ever passed through Sandhurst–I well remember Dr Heathcote allowing me to look at my own file and my amazement at discovering that what I had thought to be my clever concealment of all sorts of unpleasant character traits as an officer cadet was well known to the authorities and accurately recorded by them. Tony Heathcote’s first love was Asia his doctoral thesis was on British policy in Baluchistan and he has published extensively on the British Indian Army, the 1857 Mutiny and the Afghan Wars, but he has also produced three reference books which, if they are not already on the shelves of every military historian, certainly should be: The British Field Marshals, The Admirals of the Fleet and most recently Nelson’s Trafalgar Captains : succinct, accurate, informative and immensely readable biographies of everyone who ever held those ranks or appointments. Now he has turned his attention to Arthur Wellesley, first Duke of Wellington and, in my opinion at least, England’s greatest general.

Well before the appearance of Wellington, the British had decided that they would pursue military policy on land with a professional, rather than a conscript, Army. Professionals cost more than levies and so that Army would be small. British campaigns on land of necessity would usually be fought as part of a coalition and often in difficult or undeveloped terrain. To be a successful British general meant being able to co-operate with allies and having an understanding of logistics–that unsexy, undramatic, often boring and absolutely vital aspect of military management without which you can do nothing. Leading an attack on an enemy position is easy: organising the feeding, transportation, accommodation, supply and medical care of an army in an inhospitable country a long way from home is not. Arthur Wellesley joined the Army because there was no other avenue for advancement open to the younger son of impoverished Anglo-Irish gentry, and it was an Army that due to the years of peace since the Seven Years War and a reluctance to spend money was going through one of its periods of incompetence, inward looking and poor leadership. The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars gave Wellesley his opportunity, and it is for his command of the Anglo-Portuguese army in the Iberian Peninsula that he is remembered, but he learned his trade –particularly about operating in a coalition and how to manage logistics in the Third World–in India, whither he went as a battalion commander laden with debt and returned as a reasonably comfortably-off major general. Wellesley was probably no better a tactician than John Moore, but unlike Moore he understood the political imperatives of what he was doing, and could operate with difficult allies and with the Royal Navy. Much has been written about Wellesley/Wellington, and biographies of some of his subordinates are on the shelves–Picton, the irascible Welshman Stapleton Cotton, the man Wellington considered to be one of the few cavalry officers capable of commanding more than a squadron ‘Daddy’ Hill, who was only ever heard to swear twice Craufurd of the Light Division and Paget/Uxbridge/Anglesey, who lost his leg at Waterloo, are probably the best known, and a biography of Thomas Graham is in preparation, but many of Wellington’s subordinate commanders and staff officers are just names to most. In this much-needed addition to the literature of the period Dr Heathcote shines a scholarly light on another of the characteristics that made Wellington a great general–his ability to use the strengths of his subordinates and compensate for their weaknesses. Wellington had very little say as to who would command his formations and, in an age when commissions were purchased, it was very difficult to sack anyone, but he generally managed to place his juniors where they could operate to the best advantage to the army or where they could do least damage to it. This book describes not only the better known divisional commanders but also men like William Erskine, who was probably mad John Sherbrooke who, as the second lieutenant colonel in the 33rd Foot, taught the young Arthur Wesley much of the minutiae of regimental soldiering and who to this day has a Canadian regiment named after him Karl Alten, the German officer who took over the Light Division after the death of Craufurd, and William Carr Beresford, illegitimate son of the Marquis of Waterford who, while no great field commander, performed near miracles in reconstituting the Portuguese army until its soldiers were every bit as good as their British comrades. The staff is not neglected and George Murray, the quartermaster-general (chief of staff in modern parlance), James McGrigor, the chief medical officer, Richard Fletcher, the Royal Engineer, and Alexander Dickson of the Royal Artillery are all included. The last three were not generals but owing to the system of promotion by seniority were effectively doing the job of generals, as those generals who did exist in their respective arms were mostly too old, too fat or too confused to carry out the duties of the appointment. Heathcote also looks at the battles and, while the well known ones are covered, he does not neglect the lesser-known but equally interesting clashes.

Wellington was not necessarily a warm or approachable man–but then nice chaps don’t win wars–but by his understanding of the political restrictions on waging war by his intellect that allowed him to plan ahead and yet remain flexible by his ability to keep his army in the field, well fed and supplied, far from home and with allies who in many cases were of dubious value, and by his knack of reading men’s characters and placing subordinates where they could operate to the limit of their varying abilities Arthur Wellesley was a great general and a great man by the standards not just of his age but of any age–and there are many parallels with British military operations today. This admirable book will serve not only as a work of reference for the cognoscenti, but also as a fascinating record of fascinating men in a fascinating time for the general reader with an interest in the history of this nation and of warfare everywhere.


Wellington's Peninsular War Generals and Their Battles, A Biographical and Historical Dictionary, T. A. Heathcote - History

Wellington's achievements in the Peninsular War cannot be overestimated. At the outset in 1808 Napoleon and his Marshals appeared unstoppable. By the close Wellington and his Army had convincingly defeated the French and taken the war across the Pyrenees into France itself. He and his Generals had waged a hugely successful campaign both by conventional means and guerrilla warfare.

This book contains the pithy biographies of some forty senior officers who served Wellington, in the majority of cases, so ably during this six year war. Many had experience of battle prior to the Peninsular and went on to greater heights thereafter. There is a section summarizing the major engagements that this 'band of brothers' took part in.

The book is arranged in alphabetical order and each thoroughly researched entry places its subject's life in his historical and political context. The result is a highly entertaining, informative and authoritative book.

About The Author

Tony Heathcote was the Librarian at the RMAS Sandhurst until his retirement. He has written numerous books including the two biographical dictionaries (above) both under the Pen and Sword imprint.

REVIEWS

&ldquo&hellipinformative, well written, and an essential reference tool for those interested in the period.&rdquo

- The Past in Review

Download Now!

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with Wellingtons Peninsular War . To get started finding Wellingtons Peninsular War , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these Wellingtons Peninsular War I can get now!

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


Watch the video: ACQUA MOTION parte 01 - Modelo Julinha


Comments:

  1. Kelvan

    Agree, very useful information

  2. Aidrian

    I'm sorry, but, in my opinion, mistakes are made. I am able to prove it. Write to me in PM, it talks to you.

  3. Aiden

    good information

  4. Samulrajas

    I think you are wrong. I'm sure. I can prove it. Email me at PM, we will discuss.



Write a message