R-16 SS-93 - History

R-16 SS-93 - History


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R-16 SS-93

R-16

(Submarine No. 93: dp. 569 (surf.), 680 (subm.); 1. 186'2" b. 18' dr. 14'6"; s. 13.5 k. (surf.), 10.5 k. (subm.); cpl. 29, a. 1 3”, 421"tt.;el.R-I)

R-l ff (Submarine No 93) was laid down by the Union Iron Works, San Francisco, Calif., 26 April 1917, Launched 15 December 1917, sponsored by Mrs. Edward R. Wilson, and commissioned 5 August 1918, Lt. Comdr. Ceeil Y. Johnston in command.

Following commissioning, R-16 Froceeded to Balboa, C.Z., whence she conducted patrols unbl December. Then ordered back to California, she remained on the west coast into June 1919. On the 17th she got underway from San Francisco and on the 25th, arrived at Pearl Harbor. Desigated SS-93 in July 1920 she operated with fleet units for the next 11 years.

R-16 departed Pearl Harbor 12 December 1930 and, after transiting the Panama Canal, proceeded to Philadelphia where she decommissioned 12 May 1931. In reserve for the next 9 years, she recommissioned 1 July 1940 and, by the end of the year, had again assumed patrol duties in waters off Panama. Ordered back to the east coast in the fall of 1941, she arrived at Key West 2 days after the attack on Pearl Harbor. By 18 December, she was at New London, whence she conducted patrols and assisted in antisubmarine warfare training into February 1942. Shifted to the Virgin Islands the next month, she continued her dual mission in the Caribbean, operating from St. Thomas and from Trinidad until 1 March 1943 when she returned to New London. There she conducted operations for the submarine school, the sound laboratory, and for DE and DD training units. Between 1 August 1943 and 20 March 1944, she operated from Bermuda, then returned to New London for her last year of naval service.

R-l6 departed New London for Philadelphia 4 July 1945. Arriving the following day, she was decommissioned on the 16th and struck from the Navy list on the 25th. She was sold and delivered to the North American Smelting Co., Philadelphla, in March 1946.


USS R-5 (SS-82)

USS R-5 (SS-82) was an R-class coastal and harbor defense submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 16 October 1917 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 24 November 1918 sponsored by Miss Margaretta King, and commissioned on 15 April 1919, Lieutenant Commander Eric L. Barr in command.

  • 569 long tons (578 t) surfaced
  • 680 long tons (691 t) submerged
  • 13.5 knots (25.0 km/h 15.5 mph) surfaced
  • 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h 12.1 mph) submerged
  • 4 × 21 inch (533 mm)torpedo tubes
  • 1 × 3"/50 caliber gun

Hide and Seek in April 1920 – Submarine Style

The mission leading up to that visit was not a long one but we were going to pick up members of some of our families after the stay was over and do a dependents cruise back to our home port in Pearl Harbor. It would be the first (and only) time my First Mate would get a chance to see me at work and ride a boat under the water.

Maui has long been a favorite place for sailors of all kinds and is legendary for its beauty and hospitality. So it wasn’t a surprise to read of this unique visit from an earlier submarine group one hundred years ago.

It was even less of a surprise to read about the incident in the second half of this story.

The Maui news. (Wailuku, Maui, H.I.), 30 April 1920

Subs And Airplanes Play Hide-And-Seek

Under-Sea And Air Fighters Visit Maui Enroute To Hilo Officers Ascend Haleakala Submarines Among Best Of Their Kind

Maui people were Interest this week in the maneuvers in local waters of three of Uncle Sam’s submarines in connection with two naval seaplanes which are playing a little game of hide and seek between Honolulu and Hilo and return. The underwater boats are the R-15, R-16, and R-17. They came first into Kahului harbor late last Friday afternoon and the following Sunday ran around to Lahaina where on Tuesday morning the two Flying boats, Nos. 41 and 42 joined them, from Honolulu.

A tender vessel, the Delaware was also at Lahaina and from her the airplanes replenished their fuel supply and continued on to Hilo, the submarines being scattered along the course. Three other submarines of the flotilla and of the same class, had already proceeded to Hilo where they were to be joined by the other units of the expedition. The submarines were in command of Commander F. X. Gygax, who is head of the entire submarine division in the Islands. He and seven of his officers took time on Saturday and Sunday to make an ascent of Haleakala and report a most pleasant trip.

With the exception of an “S” class of under-water fighters which are now being built, and of which but two or three vessel have yet been finished, the “R” subs are the latest thing the United States has in this class of craft. They are about 600 tons register and according to a naval officer are highly efficient. “The more we learn about the German submarines which caused so much trouble during the war”, said this officer, “the better we feel about our own boats.” There are at present 6 of the undersea fighters with permanent station at Pearl Harbor and more will probably be added before long.

The airplanes which are maneuvering this week are in command of Lt. Commander R.D. Kirkpatrick, who is in charge of the naval flying division in the Islands. This is the first time that the navy has attempted inter-island flights, all former flying of this kind having been done in army planes. It is reported that much of this kind of practice is probable in the future.

USS R-16 (SS-93) was an R-class coastal and harbor defense submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down by the Union Iron Works in San Francisco, California, on 26 April 1917. She was launched on 15 December 1917 sponsored by Mrs. Edward R. Wilson, and commissioned on 5 August 1918 with Lieutenant Commander Cecil Y. Johnston in command.

Following commissioning, R-16 proceeded to Balboa, Panama Canal Zone, whence she conducted patrols until December. Then ordered back to California, she remained on the West Coast into June 1919. On 17 June she got underway from San Francisco, California, and on 25 June, arrived at Pearl Harbor. Given hull classification symbol SS-93 in July 1920 she operated with fleet units for the next 11 years.

Interesting note: The R-16 boat served all the way until July of 1945 before being sold for scrap. That is 27 years. Even though not all of that time was in active service, it’s still not bad for a boat that was built with some pretty rudimentary methods of the day.

Now, as Paul Harvey would say: The Rest of the Story

Also on the front page:

Okolehao Gets Submarine Men Into Serious Pilikia

Four blue jackets from the submarine R-16, which was in Kahului harbor last Saturday, succeeded in making connection with the Maul okolehao supply last Saturday night, after which they made things lively in Wailuku for an hour or two before they were run in by the police.

Before this occurred, however, they had attempted to force their way into the home or Miss Ah Choy Young and her brother, on lower Market street near the bridge. Miss Young who was alone at the time, screamed for help when the men began throwing stones through the windows and to bombard the door. Neighbors phoned for the police and the disturbers were put in the cooler for the night. On Sunday morning they were turned over to the squadron commander who has preferred charges against all four men who will be court martialed.

Pilikia means trouble

Okolehao definition is – an alcoholic liquor distilled from ti or taro roots. In Hawaii, alcohol was first made by English sailors as a beer from fermented roots of the ti plant in the 1780’s. In 1790 an escaped Australian convict brought distillation to Hawaii, using the ti root beer to produce a highly alcoholic spirit which became Hawaii’s only indigenous distilled spirit, Okolehao.

The story of okolehao’s first appearance is a bit mysterious, but Isabella Aiona Abbott, in her book La’au Hawaii: Traditional Uses of Hawaiian Plants, attributes it to English ship captain Nathaniel Portlock. Part of captain Cook’s crew in 1780, Portlock needed a way to prevent scurvy among his sailors and so, according to Abbott, he dug up the root of a ti plant and, after baking it, fermented it into a crude sort of beer.

It took about 10 years for someone to finally distill the beer into liquor. That someone, according to the Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, was an escaped convict named William Stevenson who had fled the penal colony of New South Wales, Australia, by stowing away on a passing ship. The ship made land in the Hawaiian islands and soon thereafter the enterprising Stevenson used two large iron pots from a whaling ship to boil his distillate. To the native Hawaiians, the two pots resembled a person’s backside, so they gave the drink the name “okolehoa,” which roughly translates to “iron bottom.”

Illegally made oke, with the addition of sugar cane and pineapple, saturated Hawaii during both prohibitions.

At first okolehao was embraced, both by sailors from the West who craved something powerful (the stuff was almost pure alcohol) and by the native people, including chiefs and even king Kamehameha I. Fearing overindulgence, the king famously banned all “strong drink” in 1818.

The ban was partially due to the influence of Protestant missionaries like Hiram Bingham from the United States. Through their urging, the Hawaiian royalty began abandoning not only alcohol, but many of their traditional practices (even the Hula). And while liquor was legal for Westerners and colonists, it was banned among native people until Kamehameha I’s prohibition was lifted in 1833 by Kamehameha III.

This was the first of two prohibitions the islands suffered (the second being imposed by the U.S. government in 1920), and the first time the islands saw moonshining and bootlegging. Illegally made oke, with the addition of other ingredients like sugar cane and pineapple, saturated Hawaii during both prohibitions and up through World War II when other spirits weren’t so easily found — but it never really found its way off the islands.

Leave it to Bubbleheads to figure out a way to have a Liberty Incident in Paradise!

I don’t know if it’s the lifestyle or the inherent danger of the submarines they ride, but the connection between submariners and alcohol has always been a pretty strong one. I think it’s like you stared death in the face and death blinked. But you know it also might have been a twitch and next time it won’t.

I spent three short tours in Hawaii and loved the people I got to know as well as some of the unique language. Of course, the big ones of Aloha and Mahalo were the ones most of us saw pretty regularly. I read today that the proper response to the word Mahalo (thank you) could be “A’ole pilikia.”

That means, no problem! I hope all of your liberties are “A’ole pilikia.”

Postscript: In the same Maui Newspaper was a retrospective of the past twenty years. Included in that look back was this small item:


Pacific Ocean operations [ edit | edit source ]

Assigned to Pearl Harbor, Navajo operated in the Hawaiian Islands throughout her Naval career, performing towing and docking operations. On 17 July 1920 she was reclassified as AT-52.

In 1922, Water Barge #10, while in tow by Navajo, collided with the submarine R-16 (SS-93). With a hole in her bow, the barge sank within minutes. The gallant action of men from Navajo resulted in rescue of the barge's three-man crew. After decommissioning, Navajo was struck from the Navy List on 24 April 1937.


STATE OF IDAHO JUDICIAL BRANCH Supreme Court

(a) Mandatory Disclosure of Evidence and Material by the Prosecution. As soon as practicable after the filing of charges against the accused, the prosecuting attorney must disclose to defendant or defendant’s counsel any material or information in the prosecuting attorney's possession or control, or that later comes into the prosecuting attorney's possession or control, that tends to negate the guilt of the accused as to the offense charged or that would tend to reduce the punishment for the offense. The prosecuting attorney's obligations under this paragraph extend to material and information in the possession or control of members of the prosecuting attorney's staff and of any others who have participated in the investigation or evaluation of the case who either regularly report, or have reported in that case, to the office of the prosecuting attorney. The prosecuting attorney must also disclose the general nature of evidence of other crimes, wrongs, or acts, it intends to introduce at trial as required by Rule 404(b) of the Idaho Rules of Evidence.

(b) Disclosure of Evidence and Materials by the Prosecution on Written Request. Except as otherwise provided in this rule, the prosecuting attorney must, at any time following the filing of charges, on written request by the defendant, disclose the following information, evidence and material to the defendant:

(1) Statement of Defendant. On written request of a defendant, the prosecuting attorney must permit the defendant to inspect and copy or photograph:

(A) any relevant written or recorded statements made by the defendant in the possession, custody or control of the state, the existence of which is known or is available to the prosecuting attorney by the exercise of due diligence

(B) the substance of any relevant, oral statement made by the defendant, whether before or after arrest, to a peace officer, prosecuting attorney or agent of the prosecuting attorney and

(C) the recorded testimony of the defendant before a grand jury that relates to the offense charged.

(2) Statement of a Co-Defendant. On written request of a defendant, the prosecuting attorney must permit the defendant to inspect and copy or photograph:

(A) any written or recorded statements of a co-defendant and

(B) the substance of any relevant oral statement made by a co-defendant, whether before or after arrest, in response to interrogation by any person known by the co-defendant to be a peace officer or agent of the prosecuting attorney.

(3) Defendant's Prior Record. On written request of the defendant, the prosecuting attorney must furnish the defendant copy of the defendant's prior criminal record, if any, if it is then or may become available to the prosecuting attorney.

(4) Documents and Tangible Objects. On written request of the defendant, the prosecuting attorney must permit the defendant to inspect and copy or photograph:

or copies or portions of them, that are in the possession, custody or control of the prosecuting attorney and that:

(A) are material to the preparation of the defense,

(B) are intended for use by the prosecutor as evidence at trial, or

(C) were obtained from the defendant or belong to the defendant.

(5) Reports of Examinations and Tests. On written request of the defendant, the prosecuting attorney must permit the defendant to inspect and copy any results or reports of physical or mental examinations, and of scientific tests or experiments, made in connection with the particular case, that are in the possession, custody or control of the prosecuting attorney or the existence of which is known or is available to the prosecuting attorney by the exercise of due diligence.

(6) State Witnesses. On written request of the defendant, the prosecuting attorney must furnish to the defendant a written list of the names and addresses of all persons having knowledge of relevant facts who may be called by the state as witnesses at the trial, together with any record of prior felony convictions of any of them, that is within the knowledge of the prosecuting attorney. The prosecuting attorney must also furnish, on written request, the statements made by the prosecution witnesses or prospective prosecution witnesses to the prosecuting attorney or the prosecuting attorney's agents or to any official involved in the investigation of the case unless a protective order is issued as provided in subsection (l) of this rule.

(7) Expert Witnesses. On written request of the defendant, the prosecutor must provide a written summary or report of any testimony that the state intends to introduce at trial or at a hearing pursuant to Rules 702, 703 or 705 of the Idaho Rules of Evidence. The summary provided must describe the witness’s opinions, the facts and data for those opinions, and the witness's qualifications. Disclosure of expert opinions regarding mental health must also comply with the requirements of Idaho Code § 18-207. The prosecution is not required to produce any materials not subject to disclosure under subsection (g) of this Rule. This subsection does not require disclosure of expert witnesses, their opinions, the facts and data for those opinions, or the witness's qualifications, intended only to rebut evidence or theories that have not been disclosed under this Rule prior to trial.

(8) Police Reports. On written request of the defendant, the prosecuting attorney must furnish to the defendant reports and memoranda in possession of the prosecuting attorney that were made by a police officer or investigator in connection with the investigation or prosecution of the case.

(9) Digital Media Recordings (Audio and Video Files). On request, the prosecuting attorney must release to defendant digital media that may or may not contain protected information as defined by this Rule. The prosecuting attorney must state whether the disclosure contains protected information.

(A) Unredacted Digital Media. The prosecuting attorney may release unredacted digital media to defense counsel for the purpose of expediting a resolution in a case prior to trial or hearing. The obligation of defense counsel is as follows:

(i) Defense counsel, including agents of defense counsel, may review the unredacted digital media and discuss the content of the recording with the defendant but must not share the unredacted digital media in any manner with the defendant without prior consent of the prosecuting attorney or an order of the court.

(ii) With prior consent of the prosecuting attorney or an order of the court, defense counsel may allow the defendant to view the unredacted digital media in the presence of defense counsel or defense counsel’s agent, but defense counsel must not allow the defendant to retain a copy of the digital media in any version, to take photographs, or to otherwise duplicate the digital media in any form.

(iii) Defense counsel must take reasonable steps to ensure that the unredacted digital media is safely stored and cannot be accessed by anyone other than defense counsel or defense counsel’s agents.

(B) Redacted Digital Media. If the prosecuting attorney determines that the digital media contains protected information that requires redaction prior to disclosure, the prosecuting attorney must provide a redacted version of the digital media, along with a written explanation of the information that was redacted. Defense counsel may allow the defendant to view and retain a copy of any media that is redacted by the prosecuting attorney. If defense counsel disagrees with any of the prosecuting attorney’s redactions, before allowing the defendant to review any unredacted media, a Motion to Compel must be filed and argued in accordance with these Rules.

(C) Self-Represented Defendants. When a defendant chooses to proceed without counsel, the prosecuting attorney may release unredacted digital media to the defendant but, if the prosecuting attorney determines that digital media should not be disclosed because it contains protected information, the prosecuting attorney must seek a Protective Order pursuant to subsection (d)(2)(B) of this Rule.

(10) Disclosure by Order of the Court. On motion of the defendant showing substantial need in the preparation of the defendant's case for additional material or information not otherwise covered by this Rule, and that the defendant is unable without undue hardship to obtain the substantial equivalent by other means, the court may order the additional material or information to be made available to the defendant. The court may, on the request of any person affected by the order, vacate or modify the order if compliance would be unreasonable or oppressive.

(c) Disclosure of Evidence by the Defendant on Written Request. Except as otherwise provided in this rule, the defendant must, at any time following the filing of charges against the defendant, on written request by the prosecuting attorney, disclose the following information, evidence and material to the prosecuting attorney:

(1) Documents and Tangible Objects. On written request of the prosecuting attorney, the defendant must permit the prosecuting attorney to inspect and copy or photograph:

or copies or portions of them, that are in the possession, custody or control of the defendant, and that the defendant intends to introduce in evidence at the trial.

(2) Reports of Examinations and Tests. On written request of the prosecuting attorney, the defendant must permit the prosecuting attorney to inspect and copy or photograph any results or reports of physical or mental examinations and of scientific tests or experiments made in connection with the particular case if they are within the possession or control of the defendant, that the defendant intends to introduce in evidence at the trial, or that were prepared by a witness whom the defendant intends to call at the trial when the results or reports relate to testimony of the witness.

(3) Defense Witness. On written request of the prosecuting attorney, the defendant must furnish the prosecuting attorney a list of names and addresses of witnesses the defendant intends to call at trial.

(4) Expert Witnesses. On written request of the prosecuting attorney, the defendant must provide a written summary or report of any testimony that the defense intends to introduce pursuant to Rules 702, 703 or 705 of the Idaho Rules of Evidence at trial or hearing. The summary provided must describe the witness’s opinions, the facts and data for those opinions and the witness’s qualifications. Disclosure of expert opinions regarding mental health must also comply with the requirements of Idaho Code § 18-207. The defense is not required to produce any materials not subject to disclosure under subsection (h) of this Rule, or any material otherwise protected from disclosure by defendant’s constitutional rights.

(d) Redacting Protected Information from Responses to Discovery. The party providing discovery may redact protected information from the information or material provided.

(1) Protected information means:

(A) Contact Information. The home addresses, business addresses, telephone numbers (including cell phones), and email addresses of an alleged victim, or of a witness, or of the spouse, children, or other close family members of the alleged victim or witness, and the places where any of those persons regularly go, such as schools and places of employment and worship.

(B) Personal Identifying Information. The dates of birth and social security numbers of any persons other than the defendant.

(C) Private Information. Personal identification numbers (PINs), passwords, financial account numbers, information relating to financial transaction cards, and medical information protected by federal law that is not directly related to the crime charged.

(2) A prosecuting attorney who redacts protected information must follow the following procedure:

(A) If the defendant is represented by counsel, the prosecuting attorney must serve defendant's counsel with a redacted copy of the discovery printed on white paper at the same time as an unredacted copy of the discovery printed on paper of a color that is clearly distinguishable from white. The defendant's attorney, including appellate counsel, must not disclose the protected information to the defendant or to a member of the defendant's family without the consent of the prosecuting attorney or an order of the court on a showing of need.

(B) If the defendant is not represented by counsel, the prosecuting attorney must serve the defendant with a redacted copy of the discovery and, within seven days of doing so, even if the disclosure was not in response to a discovery request, must file with the court and serve on the defendant a motion for a protective order with respect to the redacted information.

(3) A defense attorney or defendant who redacts protected information must serve the prosecuting attorney with a redacted copy of the discovery printed on white paper at the same time as an unredacted copy of the discovery printed on paper of a color that is clearly distinguishable from white. The State's attorney, including appellate counsel, must not disclose the protected information to the alleged victim or to a member of the alleged victim’s family without the consent of the defendant or an order of the court on a showing of need.

(4) Print on Colored Paper. In any case where the prosecuting attorney provides discovery to defense counsel in an electronic format, if the attorney receiving the electronic discovery desires to print the discovery, the attorney must print the unredacted discovery on colored paper as required by subsection (d)(3) of this rule.

(e) Failure to Make Written Request, Waiver.

(1) Any request by a party for information, evidence or material under subsections (b) and (c) of this rule must be in writing with the original request filed with the court and a copy served on the prosecuting attorney or the defense attorney or self-represented defendant. Failure to file and serve the request constitutes a waiver of the right to discovery under subsections (b) and (c) of this rule. If no written request for discovery is filed and served by the defendant, the defendant will not be permitted to raise as error in any subsequent proceeding the failure of the prosecution to disclose the information described in subsection (b) of this rule.

(2) Form of Request. A request for the information, evidence and material under subsection (b) of this rule must be in substantially the form found in Appendix A.

(f) Response to Request, Failure to File a Response.

(1) Response to Request. The attorney or defendant on whom a request has been served must file and serve a written response within 14 days of service of the request by filing the original copy with the court and serving a copy on the opposing party, which must state one or more of the following:

(A) that the response has already been complied with and that the inquiring party has been furnished the information, evidence and material listed in the request

(B) that there is no objection to the discovery of the information, evidence and materials sought by the request and that the opposing party will be permitted discovery at a time and place certain

(C) that the responding party objects to part or all of the information, evidence and materials sought to be discovered, which objection must be specific and state all grounds for the objection.

(2) Failure to Comply. Unless otherwise ordered by the court on a showing of good cause or excusable neglect, the failure to file and serve a response within the time required by this rule constitutes a waiver of any objections to the request and is grounds for the imposition of sanctions by the court.

(3) A response to a request must be in the form found in Appendix A.

(g) Prosecution Information Not Subject to Disclosure.

(1) Work Product. Disclosure must not be required of:

(A) legal research or of records,

(C) reports or memoranda to the extent that they contain the opinions, theories or conclusions of the prosecuting attorney or members of the prosecuting attorney's legal staff.

(2) Informants. Disclosure must not be required of an informant's identity unless the informant is to be produced as a witness at a hearing or trial, subject to any protective order under subsection (l) of this rule or a disclosure order under subsection (b)(6) of this rule.

(h) Defense Information Not Subject to Disclosure. Except as to scientific or medical reports, this rule does not authorize the discovery or inspection of reports, memoranda, or other internal defense documents made by the defendant, or defendant's attorneys or agents in connection with the investigation or defense of the case, or of statements made by the defendant or prosecuting attorney or defense witnesses, or prospective state or defense witnesses to the defendant, defendant's agents or attorneys.

(i) Failure to Call Witnesses. The fact that a witness's name is on a list furnished under this rule and that witness is not called must not be commented on at the trial.

(j) Continuing Duty to Disclose. If, after compliance with a request issued pursuant to this rule, and prior to or during trial, a party discovers additional evidence or the evidence of an additional witness or witnesses, or decides to use additional evidence, witness or witnesses, the evidence is automatically subject to discovery and inspection under the prior request. The party must immediately notify the other party or that party's attorney and the court of the existence of the additional evidence or the names of the additional witness or witnesses in order to allow the other party to make an appropriate request for additional discovery or inspection.

(k) Orders for Discovery. If a party has failed to comply with a request for discovery under this rule, the court, on motion of a party, may:

(1) order a party to permit the discovery or inspection,

(2) prohibit the discovery of part or all of the information, evidence or material sought to be discovered, or

(3) enter such other order as it deems just in the circumstances.

An order of the court granting discovery under this rule must specify the time, place and manner of making the discovery and inspection and provide reasonable terms and conditions.

(l) Protective Orders. At any time the court may, for good cause, deny, restrict, or defer discovery or inspection, or grant other appropriate relief. The court may permit a party to show good cause by a written statement that the court will inspect ex parte. If relief is granted, the court must preserve and seal the entire text of the party’s statement.

(m) Sexually Exploitative Material.

(1) Any property or material that constitutes or is alleged to constitute sexually exploitative material as defined in Idaho Code § 18-1505B or Idaho Code § 18-1507 must remain in the care, custody, and control of either the court or a law enforcement agency.

(2) A court must deny any request by a defendant to copy, photograph, duplicate, or otherwise reproduce any property or material that constitutes or is alleged to constitute sexually exploitative material as defined in Idaho Code § 18-1505B or Idaho Code § 18-1507, so long as the prosecuting attorney makes the property or material reasonably available to the defendant.

(3) For purposes of subsection (m)(2) of this rule, property or material is deemed to be reasonably available to the defendant if the prosecuting attorney provides ample opportunity for inspection, viewing, and examination of the property or material by the defendant, defense counsel, and any individual the defendant may seek to qualify to furnish expert testimony at trial.


Social Security

    or
  • By calling our national toll-free service at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) or visiting your local Social Security office. An appointment is not required, but if you call ahead and schedule one, it may reduce the time you spend waiting to apply.

You can help by being ready to:

Documents you may need to provide

We may ask you to provide documents to show that you are eligible, such as:

  • Birth certificate or other proof of birth
  • Proof of U.S. citizenship or lawful alien status if you were not born in the United States
  • U.S. military discharge paper(s) if you had military service before 1968
  • W-2 forms(s) and/or self-employment tax returns for last year
  • An Adult Disability Report that collects more details about your illnesses, injuries or conditions, and your work history
  • Medical evidence already in your possession. This includes medical records, doctors' reports, and recent test results and
  • Award letters, pay stubs, settlement agreements or other proof of any temporary or permanent workers' compensation-type benefits you received [more info] .

We accept photocopies of W-2 forms, self-employment tax returns or medical documents, but we must see the original of most other documents, such as your birth certificate. (We will return them to you.)

Do not delay applying for benefits because you do not have all the documents. We will help you get them.

What we will ask you

  • Your name, gender and Social Security number
  • Your name at birth (if different)
  • Your date of birth and place of birth (State or foreign country)
  • Whether a public or religious record was made of your birth before age 5
  • Your citizenship status
  • Whether you or anyone else has ever filed for Social Security benefits, Medicare or Supplemental Security Income on your behalf (if so, we will also ask for information on whose Social Security record you applied)
  • Whether you have used any other Social Security number
  • Whether you were ever in the active military service before 1968 and, if so, the dates of service and whether you have ever been eligible to receive a monthly benefit from a military or Federal civilian agency
  • Whether you or your spouse have ever worked for the railroad industry
  • Whether you have earned Social Security credits under another country's Social Security system
  • Whether you qualified for or expect to receive a pension or annuity based on your own employment with the Federal government of the United States or one of its States or local subdivisions
  • Whether you are currently married and, if so, your spouse's name, date of birth (or age) and Social Security number (if known)
  • The names, dates of birth (or age) and Social Security numbers (if known) of any former spouses
  • The dates and places of each of your marriages and, for marriages that have ended, how and when they ended
  • The names of any unmarried children under age 18, age 18-19 and in elementary or secondary school, or disabled before age 22
  • Whether you have or had a child under age 3 living with you during a calendar year when you had no earnings
  • Whether you have a parent who was dependent on you for 1/2 of his or her support at the time you became disabled
  • Whether you had earnings in all years since 1978
  • The name(s) of your employer(s) or information about your self-employment and the amount of your earnings for this year and last year
  • Whether you received or expect to receive any money from an employer since the date you became unable to work
  • Whether you have any unsatisfied felony or arrest warrants for escape from custody, flight to avoid prosecution or confinement, or flight-escape
  • The date you became unable to work because of illnesses, injuries or conditions and if you are still unable to work and
  • Information about any workers' compensation, black lung, and/or similar benefits you filed, or intend to file for. These benefits can:
    • Be temporary or permanent in nature
    • Include annuities and lump sum payments that you received in the past and
    • Be paid by your employer or your employer's insurance carrier, private agencies, or Federal, State or other government or public agencies.
    • Workers' Compensation
    • Black Lung Benefits
    • Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation
    • Civil Service Retirement
    • Federal Employees' Retirement
    • Federal Employees' Compensation
    • State Disability Insurance benefits
    • Military retirement pensions based on disability

    You also should bring along your checkbook or other papers that show your account number at a bank, credit union or other financial institution so you can sign up for Direct Deposit, and avoid worries about lost or stolen checks and mail delays.


    Pacific Ocean operations [ edit ]

    Assigned to Pearl Harbor, Navajo operated in the Hawaiian Islands throughout her Naval career, performing towing and docking operations. On 17 July 1920 she was reclassified as AT-52.

    In 1922, Water Barge #10, while in tow by Navajo, collided with the submarine R-16  (SS-93) . With a hole in her bow, the barge sank within minutes. The gallant action of men from Navajo resulted in rescue of the barge's three-man crew. After decommissioning, Navajo was struck from the Navy List on 24 April 1937.


    یواس‌اس آر-۱۶ (اس‌اس-۹۳)

    یواس‌اس آر-۱۶ (اس‌اس-۹۳) (به انگلیسی: USS R-16 (SS-93) ) یک زیردریایی بود که طول آن ۱۸۶ فوت ۲ اینچ (۵۶٫۷۴ متر) بود. این زیردریایی در سال ۱۹۱۷ ساخته شد.

    یواس‌اس آر-۱۶ (اس‌اس-۹۳)
    پیشینه
    مالک
    سفارش ساخت: ۲۹ اوت ۱۹۱۶
    آب‌اندازی: ۲۶ آوریل ۱۹۱۷
    آغاز کار: ۱۵ دسامبر ۱۹۱۷
    اعزام: ۵ اوت ۱۹۱۸
    مشخصات اصلی
    وزن: ۵۶۹ long ton (۵۷۸ تن)
    درازا: ۱۸۶ فوت ۲ اینچ (۵۶٫۷۴ متر)
    پهنا: ۱۸ فوت (۵٫۵ متر)
    آبخور: ۱۴ فوت ۶ اینچ (۴٫۴۲ متر)
    سرعت: ۱۳٫۵ گره (۲۵٫۰ کیلومتر بر ساعت؛ ۱۵٫۵ مایل بر ساعت)

    این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


    The Devil’s Venom

    Marshal Mitrofan Ivanovich Nedelin, commander in chief of the Soviet Union’s Strategic Rocket Forces (Credits: USSR).

    The R-16 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) was the brainchild of Mikhail Yangel. Intended to replace the R-7, R-16 was designed to use non-cryogenic fuels, deemed to be “more practical” because a missile could be readied much more quickly as a result of simpler fueling mechanisms. The selected fuels were UDMH oxidized with a 73% nitric acid/27% nitrogen tetroxide blend, a combination known as “the devil’s venom,” and for good reason. The fuels are toxic and corrosive in liquid form when burned, they produce poisonous gas.

    Air Marshal Mitrofan Nedelin, commander of the USSR’s Strategic Rocket Forces, was placed in charge of the R-16 development. Looking to score political points by having the rocket ready for the anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, Nedelin pressured Yangel and the rest of the R-16 team (some say Yangel was a willing participant here) to accelerate their timetable. They did this primarily by ignoring all of the quite sensible safety measures in effect at the time. The irony is that the missile was considerably ahead of schedule it had been expected to conduct flight testing 10 months later, in July 1961. However, the high-boiling point propellant camp felt in competition with the cryogenic liquid oxygen camp of ICBM development and wanted to show up lead Soviet rocket engineer Sergei Korolev and his R-9 missile, then under development.

    Due to in-fighting in the Soviet rocketry community, Yangel was unable to engage the best man for the job of designing the electrical guidance system for the R-16. Instead of Nikolai Pilyugin, who had designed most of the major guidance systems of the time, Yangel had to make do with Boris Konoplev, a brilliant inventor and expert in radio engineering, but not a very systematic individual. As a result, his systems had seen limited testing when they were first installed into the R-16 and they were accompanied by ambiguous instructions.

    A number of electrical system glitches arose, as may have been expected, in the run up to the anticipated October 24 launch from Tyuratam Launch Complex, the predecessor to Baikonour Cosmodrome. Nedelin responded to the glitches by calling for longer hours and more diligent effort from the workforce. By the time October 24 arrived, they had been working for 72 hours straight.

    In the video below, a History Channel documentary about the Nedelin Catastrophe.


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