Keokuk II CM-6 - History

Keokuk II CM-6 - History


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Keokuk II

(CM~6: dp. 6,150; 1. 353'; b. 67'; dr. 17'; s. 12 k.; cpl.
278; a. 2 3", 4 .50 cal. mg., 2.30 cal. mg.; cl. Keokuk)

The second Keokuk (CM - 6), formerly Columbu' Height&, was launched 1914 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa.; she was acquired by the Navy 28 July 1941 on a Maritime Commission bare boat charter; reclassifled AN-5 on 15 August 1941; and commissioned 28 February 1942, Lt ComOr. L. Brennan, USNR, in command.

Keokuk cleared Delaware Bay 7 March 1942 and arrived Norfolk the same day to commence service as a net layer. She operated out of Norfolk and Key West for 2 months before she was reclassifled CM~6 on 18 May 1942. Based at Yorktown, Va., mine depot that summer, Keokuk engaged in high priority mine laying along the Atlantic coast.

As the war in Europe intensifled, the mine layer made preparations for service in the Mediterranean. Departing Brooklyn, N.Y., 13 November, Keokuk crossed the submarine-infested Atlantic and arrived Casablanca 1 December. She remained in North African waters for 7 weeks laying mines off the harbor of Casablanca. She sailed 20 January 1943 with convoy GUS-3, arriving New York 7 February. Following repairs at Hoboken, N.J., Keokuk sailed 1 March to commence net-laying exercises out of Melville, R.I.

During April and May, the mine layer operated with the mine warfare school at Yorktown, Va.; then sailed to Brooklyn to joint a convoy bound for Algeria. Keokuk departed Brooklyn 13 June, arriving Oran, Algeria 4 July. Two days later she steamed toward Gela, Sicily, to lay antisubmarine mineflelds prior to the landings there. During these operations, on 11 July, Keokuk was attacked by six enemy planes; but antiaircraft fire drove the raiders off. After the successful conclusion of the Sicilian campaign, she operated out of Algeria until sailing for Norfolk 7 October.

Upon completion of a short overhaul, Keehuk converted to a net layer and, reclassifled ARN-4, departed Norfolk 23 November to meet another enemy in the Pacific. She arrived Tarawa 3 February 1944 after a month's stay at Pearl Harbor, and immediately commenced net laying operations in the Marshall Islands. She continued this service until 12 April when she cleared Eniwetok to load new net at San Francisco. Reebuk returned Rwajalein 9 June, and departed 2 days later to engage in the amphibious assault on Saipan. She arrived in Saipan waters 19 June and began laying antisubmarine net off Tanapag narbor.

Following the Saipan compaign the net-cargo ship operated out of Entwetok until 17 July when she once again sailed for San Francisco. Upon her return to Guadaleanal 1 September, Keokuk readied herself for the assault on Peleliu—needed as a base for the subsequent and invasion in the Philippines. She arrived off Kossol Passage 17 September and continued net laying operations for 1 month before arriving Manus 17 October. The next day Keokuk sailed for San Francisco to undergo repair and overhaul

The net-cargo ship returned Eniwetok 6 February 1945 as the raging war was approaching its climax. Keokuk departed Guam 16 February, bound for the Japanese held volcano fortress, Iwo Jima. She commenced net laying operations 4 days later, as she played her key role in this courageous undertaking. On 21 February just prior to sunset while cruising in formation with a group of LST's, an enemy "Jill" dived out of the clouds and hit Reebuk on the starboard side, knocking out most of the starboard 20mm. battery. The ffres were extinguished by 1850; the ship had 17 killed and 44 wounded in the action.

Upon completion of repairs at Leyte, the net-cargo ship sailed 19 March toward the last great hurdle Okinawa. Reekuk arrived off Berama Retto 26 March to lay antisubmarine nets prior to the invasion. With the invasion well under way, she cleared the battle area 4 April, arriving Saipan 10 April. Then after a 2-month overhaul at Pearl EIarbor, Reebuk returned Eniwetok 2 July to unload net material. As the war entered its flnal month, she sailed from Ulithi 25 July, and, after a stop at Pearl Harbor, arrived San Francisco 10 September. The veteran ship remained there until she decommissioned 5 December 1945. She was transferred to the WSA 1 July 1946 and sold to the West India Fruit & S.S. Co. 7 March 1947.

Keokuk received five battle stars for World War II service.


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Keokuk II CM-6 - History

--> P rison- P rinted — P ertinent C ontents ! Iowa. Board of Control of State Institutions. State of Iowa. Bulletin of state institutions. Vol. XXXIV, No. IV. October, 1932. Anamosa, IA: Men’s Reformatory Print, [1932]. 8vo (23 cm, 9"). 173, [7] pp.
$35.00

    Printed in a prison and containing articles on “control of communicable diseases in the state's institutions,” the Training School for Boys at Eldora, sewage treatment for the state institutions, and care of tuberculosis patients.

Provenance: Most recently in the library of Robert Sadoff, M.D., sans indicia.

• Publisher's gray wrappers printed in black interior very lightly age-toned. Very good. (40584)

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T HE K INSEY R EPORT Kinsey, Alfred. C. Wardell B. Pomeroy & Clyde E. Martin. Sexual behavior in the human male. Philadelphia & London: W. B. Saunders Co., 1948. 8vo. xv, [1], 804 pp.
$150.00

    • First edition of the revolutionary and highly influential “Kinsey Report”—a landmark in the study of human sexuality and one of the 100 most important science books in the 20th century.

• Very good, in publisher's cloth. Front free endpaper torn out. Preliminary pages with a few light creases in foremargins probably created from paper clips being fastened to them at one time. (10711)

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At L east I t's N OT E ye of N ewt Langham, William. The garden of health: containing the sundry rare and hidden vertues and properties of all kindes of simples and plants. Together with the manner how they are to bee used and applyed in medicine for the health of mans body, against divers diseases and infirmities most common amongst men. London: Printed by Thomas Harper, 1633. 4to in 8s (19 cm 7.5"). [4] ff., 702 pp., [33] ff.
$3400.00

    Preparing for a trip from England to Virginia or Massachusetts in the 1630s or 40s , one would have been well advised to make sure someone in the party was bringing a copy of Langham's work. Once in America, one would have made good use of the herbal remedies for some of the more common ailments the newly arrived would have suffered, and one would have had greater access to the “exotic” American sarsaparilla and guaiacum that Langham discusses.

    This precursor to the “Physician's Desk Reference” is a practical compendium of medicinal and other plants arranged alphabetically from “acacia” to “wormwood” with a strong emphasis on plants that “can be gotten without any cost or labour, the most of them being such as grow in most places and are common among us” (folio [2]).

Langham's organization is this: “He devoted a chapter to each plant, describing its parts and their uses, the different processes such as distillation that could be applied to it, and how the resulting products could be used for particular diseases. To every item of information he added a number and at the end of the chapter there is an index or table of conditions with the numbers that were in the main text. The reader can thus see at a glance that one herb could be used in a wide variety of conditions, and whether a specific illness could be helped by a particular drug” (Wear, pp. 82󈞿).

This is the second edition, “corrected and amended,” the first having appeared in 1597. We are sure the reading public, which was sufficient to support a second edition, would have been helped rather more if the work had had illustrations, but that would have increased the cost of the work dramatically and a wide audience was sought. The text is printed chiefly in gothic type while the end of chapter “indices” are in roman. This herbal was not printed during a period of good English typography, so the pages are dense with little white space or appreciation for making the text on the page easy on the eye rather than wearying.

• ESTC S108241 STC (rev. ed.) 15196 Alden & Landis 633/67 Huth Library 817. On Langham, see Andrew Wear, Knowledge & Practice in English Medicine, 1550�. Contemporary English calf, boards modestly ruled in blind at edges rebacked in high quality goat. Age-toning or old soiling, especially at the edges of margins and with offsetting from binding to title-page some light marginal waterstaining especially at end in index some tears (one shown here) with last leaves' edges chopped and final two with edges strengthened. Overall, an unsophisticated copy that has been spared being washed, pressed, and gussied up. (34545)

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S tout M anual from O ne of H omeopathy's M ajor P romoters Lutze, Ernst Arthur. Lehrbuch der Homöopathie von Arthur Lutze. Cöthen: Verlag der Lutze'schen Klinik, 1867. 8vo (18.5 cm, 7.25"). [8], xcvi, 918, [2] pp.
$175.00

    • The controversial Lutze (1813󈞲), a disciple of famed homeopath Samuel Hahnemann, was a charismatic Prussian physician who practiced for many years as a mesmerist and homeopathic doctor, founding a large and lavishly appointed hospital in Köthen, Germany. This volume is his encyclopedic guide to symptoms and their appropriate prescriptions.Needless to say there is an interesting herbal section.This is an early edition (stated sixth), following the first of 1855.

    Provenance: Front pastedown with label of H.C.G. Luyties' Homeopathic Pharmacy of St. Louis, MO. It was a long-standing practice of pharmacies/herbalists (whether “homeopathic” or other) to also sell books.

• Publisher's half roan and marbled paper–covered sides, spine with gilt-stamped title and arabesque decorations mildly to moderately scuffed overall, spine sunned and with small tear in upper part of leather. Paper browned and slightly embrittled one preliminary leaf with a tear from outer margin extending into text without loss. Front joint (outside cracked in top portion, hinge (inside) cracked and with an old repair, board holding nicely. Good condition with faults noted. (35823)

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I llustrated T heatre E dition Maclaren, Ian (John Watson). Beside the bonnie brier bush. New York: R.F. Fenno & Co., 1905. 8vo. Frontis., 258 pp. 5 plts.
$85.00

    • The earliest and best-known of all the tales of rural Scottish life published by “Ian Maclaren,” pseudonym of the popular author and preacher John Watson. This special illustrated theatre edition of the Rev. Watson's beloved work (originally published in 1894) features a photographic frontispiece of James H. Stoddart in the role of Lachlan Campbell, as well as five other scenes both comic and tragic. The final section of the volume is “A Doctor of the Old School,” a loving portrayal of stalwart practitioner Dr. William MacLure.

Binding: Publisher's tan cloth, front cover with double iris design stamped in green, white, and violet.

• Binding as above, minimal rubbing only. Pages and plates clean. A beautiful copy. (28613)

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T he P lague / P ublic M edicine P refigured Mead, Richard. A short discourse concerning pestilential contagion, and the methods to be used to prevent it. London: Printed for Sam. Buckley & Ralph Smith, 1720. 8vo in 4s (18.7 cm, 7.25"). [4] ff., 59, [1(blank)] pp.
$400.00

    • Plague is fascinating and horrifying to the modern mind, but is not generally seen as a likely personal threat, being as it is now rare in first world nations and treatable. In early modern times, though, it was a likely personal threat and so its fascination and horror were far more intense and immediate.

Mead was one of England's leading physicians at the beginning of the 18th century and “in 1719, in response to the public alarm over the outbreak of plague in Marseilles, the British government asked [him] to prepare a statement concerning the prevention of the disease. Mead's Short discourse anticipated the development of the English public health system in concluding that isolation of the sick in proper places is more effectual in checking the spread of contagion than either general quarantine or fumigation. Mead's book enjoyed a great popularity, going through seven editions within a year of its publication” (Norman). Garrison and Morton similarly say of the work that it was “a prophecy of what was to develop as the English public health system.”

Provenance: Huntington Library duplicate (small stamp in lower margin of final blank leaf) most recently from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• ESTC T55657 Blake p. 295 Cushing M250 Garrison & Morton 5123 Heirs of Hippocrates 769 (3rd ed.) Norman 1476 Osler 3364 (9th ed.) Waller 6394. Apparently originally in marbled wrappers, with the paper of the spine only here surviving, old creases. Two brown stains and a bit of foxing to title-page traces of old dust- or soot-soiling to upper margins of late leaves especially. Else very nice and handsomely printed. (39686)

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D ealing with the P lague in R ussia — A S tate- S ponsored M onastic P ress Mertens, Charles de. Observationes medicae de febribus putridis, de peste, nonnullisque aliis morbis. Ticini [i.e., Pavia]: Sumptibus Typographiae Monasterii S. Salvatoris et Balthassaris Comini Bibliopolae, 1791. 8vo (20.3 cm, 7.99"). 2 vols. in 1. 234, 158, 4 (adv.) pp.
$250.00

    • Mertens (1737󈟄), a Belgian physician who served for several years as supervisor of medical services at the Moscow orphanage, provided one of the earliest professional assessments of the Russian plague of 1770󈞴 as part of his present observations on febrile and pestilential diseases. This is the second printing of the first volume, following the first of 1778, and the first printing to include both volumes the work was translated into French, German, and English, with the portion specifically dedicated to the Moscow outbreak being pulled out and published separately in English as An Account of the Plague Which Raged at Moscow, in 1771. De Mertens, although an adherent of miasmatic theory, nevertheless made excellent suggestions regarding hygiene and quarantine — the latter earning him a great deal of resentment among both bureaucrats and the populace.

    The press that issued this work is an interesting one. The Austrian government created the Press of the Royal Imperial Monastery of S. Salvatore within that monastery in Pavia between 1777 and 1779, and entrusted its operation to the monks, but equipped it with modern equipment and fully financed it. In 1782 the monastery was suppressed, but from 1787 through 1792 the press continued under the supervision of Balthassare Comini, publishing many medical works. Late in in 1792 Comini took full control of the press, dropped “Typographiae Monasterii S. Salvatoris” from the imprint, and continued printing until 1821. From the beginning, the main patron of the press was the University of Pavia.

The text is nicely printed in large, clear type with a woodcut headpiece at the start of each volume (the second volume having a separate title-page) at the back are four pages of advertisements from Parisian medical publisher-bookseller J.B. Baillière, dated 1822, suggesting that perhaps Baillière had purchased the sheets as remainders. This edition is notably uncommon, with only three U.S. institutions reporting holdings to WorldCat (National Library of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Yale).

Provenance: Front free endpaper with inked ownership inscription “H.S.S. Burman” dated 1848. Later from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Blake, NLM 18th Century, p. 302. Early 19th–century quarter sheep and blue paste paper–covered boards, spine with gilt-stamped title and compartment decorations binding rubbed and scuffed, spine sunned, joints starting (sewing holding). All edges speckled red. Inscription as above small slip of paper with “Caroli de Mertens” inked in an early hand laid in. One leaf with paper flaw affecting lower outer corner, not touching text. Pages clean. (40665)

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A “ P hiladelphianum” ( P ublished in B oston) Mitchell, Silas Weir. The hill of stones and other poems. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1883. 16mo. iv, 98 pp.
$75.00

    • First edition: Romantic poems, including one Arthurian piece, written by a neurologist born in Philadelphia and known for his work on nerve injuries and erythromelalgia (“Weir Mitchell’s disease”). An early hand inked neat responses to a few lines in “The Quaker Graveyard.”

• Publisher's cloth, front cover black- and gilt-stamped, spine simply gilt-stamped, binding gently worn with minor spotting to spine and lower edge of front cover. Ownership inscription to front free endpaper. A nice copy. (2901)

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M anaging the W AR against the P LAGUE Muratori, Lodovico Antonio. Del governo della peste, e delle maniere di guardarsene . Diviso in politico, medico, & ecclesiastico. Da conservarsi, & aversi pronto per le occasioni, che Dio tenga sempre lontane ed in questa seconda edizione accresciuto dall' autore con nuove aggiunte poste in fine del libro. Torino: Pietro Giuseppe Zappata, 1721. 4to (22.4 cm, 8.82"). xxviii, 383, [3] pp.
$450.00

    Marking an evolution in 18th-century thought on public health, this treatise — written by a non-physician — covers approaches to physical, spiritual, and civic well-being in times of bubonic plague. A priest active in parish ministry, librarian to the Duke of Modena, and eminent scholar in many fields, the author (1672�) here addresses Italian law and politics regarding the handling of the disease, as well as the medical and religious procedures to be followed.

    This is the uncommon expanded third edition, following the first of 1710 and the second of 1714. While the printing is workmanlike, the text is ornamented with several large woodcut tailpieces and decorative capitals, and the title-page bears the phoenix printer's vignette of Baptista Zappata.

Provenance: Front and back pastedowns with 19th-century inked name-doodling by Ruffane (“Ruffa”) Louis Michele, one inscription dated 1813 blank page at end of dedication with early inked inscription noting presence at the library of the Cappuccini di Ceva convent, lower margins of two text pages with “De Capuccini di Ceva” inked in early hand lower margin of one page with early inked inscription “Camillo da Andoino.” Later from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Blake, NLM 18th Century, p. 316. Contemporary mottled sheep, spine with gilt-stamped leather label reading “MVR” and gilt-stamped decorations between raised bands leather scuffed, front joint starting from head, spine with areas of insect damage, front board bent some time ago and now slightly sprung. Front free endpaper lacking inscriptions as above, title-page with inked-over inscriptions. A few leaves with spots of light waterstaining to upper outer corners or outer margins. A solid, very readable copy of this often-referenced work on public disease control, with interesting provenance. (40682)

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I nvestigating the S igns of the B ody Naumann, Moritz Ernst Adolph. Handbuch der allgemeinen Semiotik. Berlin: August Hirschwald (pr. by J.G.F. Kniestädt), 1826. 12mo (17.8 cm, 7"). xviii, 456 pp.
$275.00

    Sole edition: Naumann (1798�), a German physician and professor at the University of Bonn, published a number of works on clinical medicine as well as on more metaphysical topics. Here, he covers the art of diagnosis based on interpreting signs and symptoms, including sections on mental phenomena arising from physical conditions and those “die von der Seele selbst auszugehen scheinen” (p. xviii). The work is now scarce, particularly outside of Germany, with a search of WorldCat finding just two U.S. institutions reporting holdings (National Library of Medicine & University of Chicago) and only a handful of European holdings.

Evidence of Readership: Scattered unobtrusive marks of emphasis, annotations, and corrections pencilled in an early hand.

Provenance: From the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Contemporary marbled paper, spine with gilt-stamped paper label binding rubbed and scuffed. All page edges stained blue. Occasional small, neat markings as above. A clean, pleasing copy of this uncommon medical work, in its contemporary binding. (40663)

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    First edition: Nelson, a philanthropist and popular religious writer, reminds the wealthy and well bred of their charitable obligations as Christians. After exhorting the rich to consider their salvation, Nelson solicits their support for such endeavors as building churches, funding the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, maintaining poor clergy and their families, founding seminaries and schools, relieving prisoners, and establishing houses for the improvement of ladies (both proper and fallen). The appendix provides texts of various proposals as well as statistics on numbers of residents in hospitals and schools.

The frontispiece portrait of Nelson was engraved by George Vertue after a painting by Sir Godfrey Kneller. The volume also includes all publisher's advertisements as well as the rather uncommon Poem in Memory of Robert Nelson Esquire.

This was produced to be a handsome work, printed in large type on good paper with wide margins — the better to appeal to a “quality” audience?

• ESTC T85360 Goldsmiths’-Kress 5249. Poem: ESTC T25431 Foxon P538. Contemporary speckled calf, framed and panelled in blind with blind-tooled corner fleurons rebacked with speckled calf, spine with gilt-stamped leather title-label, raised bands, and blind-tooled foliate compartment decorations. Original leather abraded, front cover with small chip to outer edge and area of faint discoloration from a now-absent label title-page institutionally rubber-stamped (no other markings). Some signatures browned and foxed, most pages clean. (25999)

The V enerable H istory COMPLETE (OXFORD). Peshall (or Pechell), John. The history of the University of Oxford, to the death of William the Conqueror. Oxford: 1772. 8vo (21.5 cm, 8.5"). [2], 32, [6] pp. [with his] The history of the University of Oxford, from the death of William the Conqueror, to the demise of Queen Elizabeth. Oxford: Pr. by W. Jackson & J. Lister for J. & F. Rivington, 1773. 4to (27.3 cm, 10.75"). [4], 264, [2] pp.
$2000.00

    • Bound together here are this author's first, 32-page history, tracing the story of education in Britain back to the Druids, and his much more extensive follow-up on Oxford's development including, e.g., passages onpolitics, religious controversies, town–gown contretemps, and epidemics. Sir John Peshall (sometimes given Pechell, formerly Pearsall), sixth baronet, was a clergyman and antiquary known for his philanthropic activities he was himself an Oxford man (BA 1739, MA 1745).

• ESTC T63374 & T68757. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper–covered sides, rebacked and corners refurbished marbled paper sides with surface wear. Front pastedown with bookplate as above, pastedown and free endpaper with small pencilled annotations. Octavo history with small portion torn away in outer margin (only) of final “Additions” leaf quarto history with dust-soiling to title-page around edges of bound-in octavo and following leaves showing impression of bind-in. Occasional light foxing only, to both items, mostly confined to margins quarto with a very few early inked corrections and annotations. (33314)

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B odoni F irst E dition: E nduring S ickness C heerfully Pasta, Giuseppe. Del coraggio nelle malattie. Trattato. [Parma: Giambattista Bodoni], 1792. 8vo (23.1 cm, 9.09"). [4], xvi, 106 pp.
$500.00

    First edition of this treatise on the art of maintaining courage and optimism during illness — an early look at the impact of patients' psychological states on their physical condition. In addition to practicing medicine in Bergamo, Italy, Pasta (1742�) was the author of literary pieces including the poem “La Musica Medica,” as well as a volume of rules of etiquette for doctors. Here, in addition to assessing the impact of temperament, education, faith, etc. on an individual's ability to withstand bodily affliction, he suggests that music, wine, opium, and good company may improve recovery. The text is presented in Bodoni's usual restrained, distinguished style.

• Brooks 469 Blake, NLM 18th Century, p. 340 De Lama, II, 77. Modern light blue paper–covered boards with dark blue morocco corner tips and shelfback, spine lettered in gilt very slight fading to outer edges of boards, otherwise showing virtually no wear. Pages wide-margined, with speckling to first and last leaves and dust-soiling at untrimmed edges first two leaves with limited light crescent of staining at gutter, those leaves and a few more with light speckles, a few leaves with paper flaws of various sorts. (40153)

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A T emperance C atechism — I mproving Y our S wine — “ H ull's P hysic” (PATENT PREPARATIONS). Abell, Truman. New-England farmer's almanac, for the year . 1834 . Fitted to the latitude and longitude of the town of Windsor, Vt. but will serve without sensible variation, for all the adjacent states. Windsor, Vt.: Ide & Goddard, [1833]. 12mo. [24] ff.
$30.00

    First almanac published by Ide & Goddard. Title-page has a wood engraved illustration of a globe, telescope, map, books, and inkwell with quill pen also illustrated with small vignettes above each month's calendar. Includes information on the sessions of the courts in New Hampshire and Vermont, college vacation schedules, advice on diet and regimen, suggestions on how to be a good neighbor, a brief manual of temperance principles, general information on insects, poultry, hogs, growing field beets, cutting corn stalks, and preserving yeast — Irish jokes, we almost add, “of course.”

Advertisements on the last page, notably for patent medicines.

• Drake 13678. Uncut copy later stitching corners cut. Slight dog-earing, title-page a little tattered. Early inked ownership signature at top of title-page and some marginalia or interlineations. (9959)

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A MAZONS — I llustrated ! Petit, Pierre. De amazonibus dissertatio, quâ an verè extiterint, necne, variis ultro citroque conjecturis & argumentis disputatur. Amstelodami: apud Johannem Wolters & Yserandum Haring, 1687. 12mo (17 cm, 6.125"). [6] ff, 398 pp., [6] ff., illus. (without the map).
$450.00

    • Using classical texts and images Petit explores the possibility that the Amazons were not merely figments of mythological fancy, but actual members of Scythian society. Using texts from Homer through Juvenal and beyond, Petit canvasses the full range of opinions and evidence from contemporary sources. His text is in Latin the Greek texts, offered in Greek, are translated into Latin as well.

The 53 in-text engravings offer iconographic evidence for the Amazons. The majority are numismatic, showing portrayals of Amazons on classical coins. Some others show works of art, especially sculpture, and representations of what Amazonian weapons might have looked like.

The work begins with a dedication to Baudelot de Dairval and a full table of contents. The body of the text is organized into chapters concerning various aspects of the lives and types of evidence relating to the Amazons. There is an “Addenda” on pp. 381󈟎 that includes discussions of Christopher Columbus, cannibalism, and Amazons in the New World. The book ends with another index.

European Americana 587/106 Sabin 61256 Hayn, Amazonen-Litteratur, 53. Recent marbled paper over boards, leather spine label. Added engraved title-page cut down with loss of imprint data and mounted without the map, often missing. Light staining to the preliminary and first few text pages. Otherwise, a rather nice copy. (40385)

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P omet's O wn E dition of H is G uide to D rugs Pomet, Pierre. Le marchand sincere ou traite general des drogues simples et composes. Paris: Chez l'Auteur, 1695. Folio (40 cm, 15.75"). Frontis., [12], 304 (i.e., 332), 108, 116, [38], 16 pp. 5 of 6 plts., illus.
$4500.00

    • Second and for the first time self-published edition of this groundbreaking, best-selling guide to botanically derived medicines, written by the chief pharmacist to Louis XIV. Highly influential in its time, Pomet's materia medica covers botanical, zoological, and mineral sources and is illustrated in this edition with almost 200 copper-engraved, in-text images including many of the plants described along with subjects such as coral, ostriches, and fish, not to mention exotica like mummies, unicorns, and some extremely implausibly depicted rhinoceroses and whales. Also present are images of harvesting and processing sugar cane, indigo, and tobacco ( all depicting black workers). In addition, the final addendum, “Remarques tres-curieuses sur plusieurs vegetaux, animaux, mineraux, & autres, que j'ai oublié d'inserer dans la premiere impression, ou que j'ai découvert du depuis,” supplies information on mercury, cinnabar, antimony, etc., along with five tipped-in plates showing mechoacan, Virginia snakeroot, indigo, drakena, and an assortment of bezoars. TheAmericana content is noteworthy, with discussion of cacao, chocolate, tobacco, jalap, and so on. Tea and coffee are present as well.

    This second edition was retitled by Pomet from the original Histoire générale des drogues, and is both less widely held and less frequently described in bibliographies (WorldCat and NUC Pre-1956 locate only seven U.S. institutional holdings). It opens with a frontispiece portrait of the author, done by A. le Clerc the Younger, facing a title-page vignette by I. Crespy sections open with decorative headpieces and capitals and many close with tailpieces.

    • Alden & Landis 695/147 Hunersdorff & Hasenkamp, Coffee, 1177� Wellcome Catalogue, IV, 411 (for first ed.) Krivatsy 9137. Contemporary mottled calf, spine gilt extra and with gilt-stamped leather title-label binding rubbed and scuffed with leather pitted, front joint cracked but holding, spine refurbished with untooled leather replacing that lost in bottom compartment. First few leaves with edges darkened and slightly ragged dedication and first leaf of preface with inkstains in upper margins early portion with light waterstaining in upper margins. Several leaves with tears from margins, some extending into text without loss a few leaves with small rectangular portion of lower inner margins cut away and two with corners torn away, one with loss of a few words and the other wish loss of about ten two leaves each with a tiny burn hole affecting one letter. One leaf torn across, tear going through two images without loss one leaf with small ink smears entering into an image frame (for “De la Colle de Poisson”), not approaching the images themselves. Lacks one plate (at pp. 46/47). Clearly a much-read, pored-over example of this great 17th-century treatise, and also one fit for much more enjoyment and “action.” (34643)

    • The king has decided that reform and improvement aere needed at the Orphans' Hospital (Hospital dos Expostos) in Lisbon and here issues the decree specifying the changes. (“Alvará, por que Vossa Magestade he servido occorrer com as providencias necessarias para fazer em cessar os inconvenientes, que até agora se praticavam no Hospital dos Expostos: Dando nova forma para as creações, entregas, e educações delles . . . “).

No copies found via WorldCat or COPAC.

• Removed from a bound volume now in modern wrappers. Old foliation neatly inked in upper outer corners clean, with wide margins. (28222)

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    • The Portuguese king decides to reform and reorganize the Hospital Real das Caldas (a thermal springs treatment center) that Queen Leonor established in 1484. The details of the innovations are detailed here. (“Alvará de Regimento, por que Vossa Magestade, annullando, cassando, e abolindo o antigo Regimento, chamado Compromisso do Hospital Real das Caldas . . . que depois delle se expediram fazendo cessar a Inspecção, que sobre elle até agora teve a Meza da Consciencia, e Ordens e separando-o da Adminstração dos Conegos Seculares de S. João Evangelista”).

No copy traced via WorldCat or COPAC.

• Removed from a volume and laid into modern wrappers. Light stain in outer margin of last leaf with a trace of same showing on a few more inward old foliation neatly inked in upper outer corners generally clean, with good margins. One inked, contemporary marginal note. (28234)

T WO Responses to A nthony C ollins Pycroft, Samuel. A brief enquiry into free-thinking in matters of religion and some pretended obstructions to it . Cambridge: Pr. at the University Press for Edmund Jeffery & Jonah Bowyer, 1713. 8vo (19.8 cm, 7.75"). [2], 150, [2 (errata)] pp. (lacking half-title). [bound with] Addenbrooke, John. A short essay upon free-thinking. London: Jonah Bowyer, 1714. 8vo. [8], 16 pp.
$500.00

    First editions of these two responses to Anthony Collins's landmark treatise on freethought (and on either deism or atheism, depending on one's interpretation), the Discourse of Free-Thinking. Numerous attacks on the Discourse were published, including rebuttals by Richard Bentley, George Berkeley, and Jonathan Swift the present two pieces are more obscure (the second was written by a physician far better remembered today for his founding of a hospital for the poor than for his writings), but offer interesting perspectives on contemporary thought.

Provenance:The first work's title-page has “Ex dono Autoris” inscribed in the upper margin in an early hand.

• Pycroft: ESTC T144698 Allibone 1712. Addenbrooke: ESTC T88427. Recent marbled paper–covered boards, front cover with gilt-stamped leather title-label. Pycroft half-title lacking title-page with annotation as above. Pages slightly age-toned, with light spotting to final leaves of Enquiry and throughout Essay. (20760)

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“ F ull a F un, T ales, An R hymes” — “ P rinted for the A uthor” [Robinson, Joseph Barlow]. [Works of Sammy Twitcher]. Owd Sammy Twitcher's CRISMAS BOWK FOR THE YEAR 1870 . Derby: Printed by the author, [1870]. 8vo (21.3 cm, 8.4"). 26 pp. 4 plts. [with] Owd Sammy Twitcher's visit tu't Gret Exibishun e Darby. Derby: Pr. by the author, [1870]. 8vo. [24] pp. [and] Owd Sammy Twitcher's second visit tu't Gret Exibishun e Darby, wi' Jim. Pr. by the author, [1870]. 8vo. [24] pp. [and] Owd Sammy Twitcher's visit tu't watter cure establishment, at Matlock-Bonk. Darby: Pr. by the author, [1872]. 8vo. 54, [14 (adv.)], 22 (adv.) pp. 4 plts.
$750.00

    • Attractively bound collection of the first editions of these four humorous works written in thick Derbyshire dialect (the first sentence here reads “Frend, ah gey thee my hond, ah dunna mene tow fingers, bur a gud grip, az tha'll feel tinglin e aw thy veins”). Three of the pieces include glossaries of some of the more opaque terms. Two of the essays recount visits to the extensive and interesting Midland Counties Fine Arts and Industrial Exhibition of 1870 , and the final entry features a lengthy appendix offering a more serious look at Matlock-Bank , its hydropathic establishments, and its other landmarks, this in standard English. Mr. Smedley's Hydropathic Establishment, referenced in the text, is the first business appearing in the subsequent advertisement section, which is extensive, evocative, and contains many ads embellished with little recommendations (by “Twitcher”?) in Darbyshire doggerel .

The author, who spent most of his life in Derby, was a sculptor as well as a Derbyshire historian, and he appears to have supplied the original illustrations here himself. The two pairs of plates (one lithographed, one steel-engraved) are done in notably different styles — we suspect that two different engravers worked from Robinson's sketches. Robinson wrote one additional Twitcher piece in 1881, describing a visit to the Royal Agricultural Show, not included in this gathering.

All the Twitcher books are now scarce: WorldCat finds very few U.K. holdings of these titles and virtually no U.S.

Provenance: First text page with early pencilled ownership inscription of Mr. H. Mills in upper outer corner.

Crismas: NSTC 2R14138 Visit: NSTC 2R14139 Second Visit: NSTC 2R14140 Watter Cure: NSTC 0643751. Later quarter green calf and fine combed marbled paper–covered sides, spine with gilt-stamped title minor shelfwear. Pencilled ownership note as above. Light age-toning first two works with mild foxing and last leaves with avery light, old waterstain across a lower corner. A highly personal production in text *and* illustration an entertaining and very uncommon gathering. (36501)

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“ I mproved T aste of M odern T ime M ust Q uestion the C rudities of F ormer D ays” Rocco, Sha [pseud. of Abisha Shumway Hudson]. The masculine cross and ancient sex worship. New York: Asa K. Butts & Co., 1874. 8vo (19 cm, 7.75"). 65, [7 (adv.)] pp. illus.
$200.00

    First edition : A study of cruciform sexual symbolism in ancient religions, touching on Indian, Egyptian, Chinese, and other mythological connections to the shape of the cross. The volume is illustrated with in-text engravings of statues, relics, and other items, including the final chapter (“The Phallus in California,” about the results of the author's antiquity-hunting expedition in Stanlislaus County, CA), which features a representation of what the author says is misidentified as an “Indian pestle.”

    Hudson was a Massachusetts-born physician and one of the founders of the Keokuk Medical College his publisher here was the notable freethinker and contraception advocate Asa K. Butts, who has supplied several pages of advertisements for some of his other publications.

• Publisher's blue cloth, front cover with gilt-stamped title and fish vignette with blind-stamped decorative borders spine slightly darkened, small spots of light discoloration, extremities rubbed. Sewing just barely starting to loosen but holding pages clean. A more than decent copy of this interesting and, shall we say, “highly personal” work . (35139)

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F ather of P ediatric M edicine Rosén von Rosenstein, Nils. Des Herrn Nils Rosén von Rosenstein . Anweisung zur Kenntniss und Cur der Kinderkrankheiten. Göttingen und Gotha : Bey Johann Christian Dieterich, 1768. 8vo (17.7 cm 7"). [8] ff., 541 (i.e., 539 ), [1] pp., [7] ff.
$600.00

    • Johann Andreas Murray's German-language translation out of the Swedish of Rosén von Rosenstein's treatise on childhood diseases and their cures (Underrättelser om barn-sjukdomar). This is the 𔄚. verm.C711 und verb. Aufl.” Rosén von Rosenstein (1706󈞵) was a Swedish nobleman, the physician to the king of Sweden, an original member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a professor at the University of Uppsala he published the first edition of this work in 1764, basing it on a series of lectures he had delivered. It is considered one of the most important works in the history of pediatrics and was quickly translated into English, German, French, and Italian.

Garrison and Morton say of the first edition in English: “Sir Frederick Still considered this work 'the most progressive which had yet been written' it gave an impetus to research which influenced the future course of paediatrics.”

Translator Murray (1740󈟇) was a Swedish student of Linnaeus and later a professor of botany and medicine at Göttingen.

Provenance: Bookplate of Adamus Elias Schmidt, dated 1784. Early 19th-century signature of a Philadelphia doctor (erased) at top of title-page.

• G&M 6323. Contemporary half calf, well worn: leather dry and gone to red with joint leather lost, cords holding, paper of covers worn through to boards in some places. Text with age-toning. Not a pretty copy but complete, and solid for now. Housed in a red cloth clamshell case. (22256)

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The “ F ather of A merican P sychiatry” on M ental I llness Rush, Benjamin. Medical inquiries and observations upon the diseases of the mind. Philadelphia: Grigg & Elliot (pr. by J. Crissy & G. Goodman), 1835. 8vo (21.9 cm, 8.62"). 365, [3 (adv.)] pp.
$350.00

    The first psychiatric textbook written and printed in America, here in an early edition — the stated fifth — following the first of 1812. Rush (1745�), born near Philadelphia to Quaker parents, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Surgeon General of the Continental Army, and a leading doctor and teacher of medicine during the late colonial and early republic years of the nation he helped pioneer the idea of insanity as a curable disease, emphasizing diagnosis and treatment (often physically based) for mental patients.

Provenance: Front pastedown with alchemically and astrologically symbolic armorial bookplate of prominent psychiatrist and book collector Marcus Crahan. Later from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

American Imprints 34062 Garrison & Morton 4924 (first ed.) Osler 3860 (first ed.). Contemporary mottled sheep, spine with gilt-stamped red leather title-label and gilt rules binding scuffed, spine with small early printed paper shelving label, joints and extremities unobtrusively refurbished. Bookplate as above. Upper margin of title-page with old repair and small hole towards upper center first 20 ff. with similar hole piercing upper outer corner, and one leaf with short tear from upper margin just touching first line of text. Final advertisement page and back free endpaper with early pencilled doodles and numerals browned, with varying degrees of foxing and old waterstaining. A solid, very readable copy of this medical landmark, with nice provenance. (40496)

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An A merican M edical D octor's O bservations . . .
. . . in G erman for the G erman P ublic
Rush, Benjamin. Medicinische Untersuchungen und Beobachtungen. Leipzig: In der Weidmannschen Buchhandlung, 1792. 8vo (22.5, 8.75"). [6], 358 pp. 2 folded leaves of tables. [with his] Neue Medicinische Untersuchungen und Beobachtungen. Nurnberg: in der Raspeschen Buchhandlung, 1797. 8vo (22.5, 8.75"). ix, [1], 302 pp.
$900.00

    • Bound in this thick volume is the sole German-language translation of both volumes of Rush's Medical Inquiries and Observations. The translation is from the pen of Friedrich Michaelis (1727�), a well-regarded and much published Leipzig physician. Among the subjects discussed and essayed in these volumes are medical practices of the American Indians, climate in Pennsylvania as it related to health, war and disease, aging, the effects of alcohol, and personal reporting on dropsy, measles, the flu, gout, and rabies.

    Rush was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Surgeon General of the Continental Army, and a leading doctor and teacher of medicine during the late colonial and early republic years of the nation.

Provenance: Bookplate of Samuel X. Radbill (Philadelphia book collector, bookplate collector, and medical doctor).

• VD18 11231777 for the first title second title not in VD18 Blake, NLM 18th Century, p. 394. Contemporary German pastepaper over boards binding very worn. Interior very good. (39953)

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EXHUMATION! Rush, Benjamin. William B. Reed, of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. Expert in the art of exhumation of the dead. [London]: 1867. 8vo. 15, [1 (blank)] pp.
$47.50

• Sewn wrappers chipped, front separating near spine author's name pencilled on front. Ex-historical society copy with stamp on title-page. Some page edges irregular and with short tears. (650)

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S ound S tudy — “ P rofessional” P rovenance Rush, James. The philosophy of the human voice: embracing its physiological history together with a system of principles by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered intelligible, and instruction, definite and comprehensive. To which is added a brief analysis of song and recitative. Philadelphia: Grigg & Elliot, 1833. 8vo (21.7 cm, 8.5 “). [4 (ads)] ff., 432 pp.
$250.00

    Second edition of this seminal study “which at the time was said to be the most advanced medical study of the human voice” (ANB), by Philadelphia physician James Rush (1786�). With over 30 diagrams and charts, including myriadmusical notations to show the pitch and duration of syllables, the text offers a systematic notation for the description of speech sounds, followed by a detailed treatise on elocution , used for generations to teach oratory, articulation, and speech therapy.

    “As a medical scientist who was led to explore the entity called 'mind' and as a 'voice scientist' who rigorously studied vocal behavior, James Rush was probably the first investigator to see that mind is inseparable from the physical phenomena of self-expression” (Hale, 234󈞏).

At the time of his death, Rush left an estate of more than one million dollars and his books to The Library Company of Philadelphia, which established the Ridgway Branch in his wife's name. Of historical note, James's father, the noted physician and politician Benjamin Rush, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, as was James's maternal grandfather, Richard Stockton.

Provenance: Ownership signature of S.J.P. Anderson, “Hanover College, In., Jan. 1836" later 19th-century bookplate of James J. Anderson, Nashville, IL. S.J.P. was among other things a famed pulpit orator for whom a book like this would have been of special interest he was sufficiently well known as such that the makers of “Brown's Bronchial Troches” long published his testimonial that their lozenges were “EFFECTUAL in removing Hoarseness and Irritation of the Throat, so common with SPEAKERS and SINGERS.”

American Imprints 21025 Sabin 74251 (note) ANB online (James Rush). On Rush's contribution to American elocution studies, see: L. Hale, Dr. James Rush, in K. Wallace, ed., History of speech education in America, pp. 219󈞑. Publisher's full plain sheep, modest gilt tooling to spine and board edges. A foxed copy, with also a light semicircular waterstain across gutter in lower margins still, complete and sound with its paper unsoiled, untattered, and strong. (34827)

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W oman E ntrepreneur, “ P atent M edicines D ivision” (1855) S.A. Osburn (Firm). [drop-title] Osburn's detergent balsam, or, the great remedy, for nursing sore mouth, canker, thrush, scarlet fever, inflamed sore throat, &c., &c. [Rochester, NY]: No publisher/printer, 1855. Tall 12mo (20 cm 7.75"). 3, [1] pp.
$225.00

    • The Library Company of Philadelphia's catalogue record for this work reports “Nehemiah Osburn (1801󈟈), prominent Rochester businessman, built Osburn House at Main and St. Paul,” and that his wife Sarah Ann Van Schuyver Osburn (1806󈟈) was a successful businesswoman, her eponymous firm specializing in patent and popular medicines for ailments of the mouth.

“To prevent fraud, the written signature of the proprietor, S.A. Osburn, will be written upon the wrapper[of the bottle], without which none is genuine. Sold, wholesale and retail, by N. Osburn, corner of Main and St. Paul Streets, Rochester, N.Y., general agent for the United States” (p. [4]) — this copy without that signature.

Printed testimonials on p. 4 are dated 1847 and 1855, and a charming wood engraving on p. 1 shows a woman administering medicine to a sick woman in her bed.

Searches of WorldCat locate only four U.S. libraries reporting ownership (PPL, NRU-Med, MWA, NRMW).

• Folded, as issued. A clean, attractive piece of medical-commercial ephemera. (38410)

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M esmerism for G erman D octors Sallis, Johann G. Der tierische Magnetismus (Hypnotismus) und seine Genese. Ein Beitrag zur Aufklärung und eine Mahnung an die Sanitätsbehörden. Leipzig: Ernst Günthers Verlag, 1887. 8vo (20.9 cm, 8.24"). [4], 108 pp.
$150.00

    First edition: An examination of the history and development of hypnotism, with an account of Mesmer's work and an emphasis on making rational use of hypnotism as therapeutic tool rather than moneymaking scam. The work is not common in U.S. institutions: A search of WorldCat found only five reporting ownership.

Provenance: Title-page with rubber-stamp reading “Bibl. Societ. Psychol. Monac.” and with inked inscription noting ownership of Dr. Franz Carl Gerster, a physician and practitioner of hypnotism most recently from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Contemporary marbled paper–covered boards with pebbled black cloth shelfback, spine with gilt-stamped title front cover with small early hand-inked paper shelving label, edges and extremities rubbed. Paper of the front hinge (inside) cracked. Pages age-toned, otherwise clean title-page with stamp and inscription as above. Final text leaf with old repair, partially shading text without loss of legibility. (40033)

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S ankey's L ectures at U niversity C ollege ( 1865 ) Sankey, William Henry Octavius. Lectures on mental diseases. London: John Churchill & Sons, 1866. 8vo (23 cm, 9"). x, 281, [1], 24 (ads) pp.
$350.00

    • Sankey (1813󈟅) was a lecturer on mental diseases at University College, proprietor of Sandwell Park Private Asylum, and “late medical superintendent of the Female Department of the Hanwell Asylum.” Here are his discourses on mental disorders, the care of the mentally ill, pathology of various disorders, moral treatment, bodily symptoms, and a large variety of other topics. An engraved plate shows six microscopic views of “cerebral matter” with a lengthy description opposite detailing how the views were prepared.

Provenance: From the library of Robert L. Sadoff, M.D., one of the nation's leading forensic psychiatrists and a director of Penn's Center for Studies in Social-Legal Psychiatry, sans indicia.

• Publisher's brown cloth embossed in blind on both covers rebacked with original spine reapplied. Dark brown endpapers. A clean sound copy. (39791)

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S carce M edical D issertation — P resentation I nscription from the D octor Santy, L. Gervais. Dissertation sur l'application des sciences physiques et mathématiques, aux sciences médicales en général suivie de l'exposition succincte de la Constitution météorologique et médicale de printemps de 1807, avec une courte description des maladies qui se sont présentées, pendant ce trimestre, à l'Hôtel-Dieu Saint-Eloi de Montpellier. Montpellier: Bonnariq, F. Avignon & Migueyron, 1808. 4to (23.3 cm, 9.2"). 55, [1] pp.
$200.00

    Sole edition of this doctoral thesis on the potential uses of physics and mathematics in various aspects of medicine including calculating probable outcomes, pathology, hygiene, anatomy, etc., submitted to the Montpellier medical school on 13 February 1808 by a physician born in Pézenas, France. Santy, who dedicated his dissertation to his parents, his uncle, and one of his former mathematics teachers, defended his work before a group of professors including Charles Louis Dumas, the head of the school. Searches of WorldCat find no U.S. institutional holdings, and only five overseas institutions reporting copies.

Provenance: Title-page with signed inked inscription noting presentation by the author to a Monsieur Robieux as a mark “d'estime, de considération, et d'amitié.” Later from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Stitched in contemporary paper wrappers, faded to rose-pink and worn. Two spots of pinhole worming throughout, touching letters without affecting sense. A solid and very readable copy of this uncommon item. (40214)

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A C ookbook C ollector's O wn PERSONAL R ecipe C ollection Schofield, Eloise. Manuscript on paper, in English. U.S.: [1950s󈞨s]. 8vo (19.7 cm, 7.75"). 59�, [1] pp. illus.
$450.00

    A remarkable culinary florilegium compiled by prominent cookbook collector Eloise Schofield. Recorded mostly by hand on 122 well-filled pages of a ledger book, these 19th- and 20th-century recipes cover a very wide range, opening with an “Orange Pie” recipe given in verse and including local specialties such as fried eel from Provincetown, “State of Maine Mincemeat,” and Nantucket corn pudding quirky historical dishes and home remedies (for earache, weeping eyes, burns, etc.), often with their sources and dates attributed and more general everyday items, passed on by family members and friends (“My mother's Harlequin Cake”). Annotations offer Schofield's thoughts and recollections: “This isn't at all bad” “Bob's grandmother always had it [lemon conserve] on hand” “Here is a very old recipe — waste not want not” “My father loved to eat he always lifted each cover off the pots every evening to see what was cooking”).

    Interspersed among the recipes are clippings and artwork affixed to the pages, including an advertisement for the “Anna Held” carnation petticoat for sale by John Wanamaker, as well as a number of other color-printed or black and white advertisements several cat photos taken from periodicals or other sources “Hints for Housekeepers,” from an 1865 magazine a recipe for “Gertie's Christmas Cake,” written in Schofield's hand on an old-fashioned holiday greeting card a color reproduction of a portion of a 1799 embroidery sampler a recipe for “Spong Cake” in an older hand, labelled by Schofield “Found in an 1887 Cook Book” ETC.

    Schofield's delight in culinary history is clear on every page — for instance, “Tripe was a favorite around 1900 and the Parker House became famous for its tripe besides the rolls. Here is a Tripe Batter highly recommended by an old lady” (p. 114).

    • Contemporary half roan and marbled paper–covered sides, spine with gilt-stamped title binding cocked, worn and scuffed overall, spine leather split and chipping. Pp. 1󈞦 excised, very likely having been the ledger's contents before repurposing gutter of first signature present reinforced some time ago. Pages age-toned with scattered smudging and offsetting. A gift of densely packed pleasure in terms of both aesthetics and domestic content, this is the most endearing example of such a book that we have ever seen. (41503)

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An E phemerum P romising A ID to M others & C hildren Society for Helping Destitute Mothers and Infants. [drop-title] Destitute mothers and infants. The address of Miss Clarke, the Secretary of this charity, has been recently changed . [Boston: Society for Helping Destitute Mothers and Infants, ca. 1890?]. 8vo ( 8.5"). [2] ff.
$115.00

    • The Society aimed at placing destitute and unwed mothers and their infants in service positions but made no promise of success or of the ability for the children to stay with the mothers. This brochure gives the names and addresses of the two women (Lillian F. Clarke, Mary R. Parkman) who did the interviewing and would supervise their lives, and lays down the strict rules regarding what is expected of the applicants.

Clearly this was written for the women seeking help and probably was widely distributed in Boston and the surrounding area.

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B urial F ees A ttacked Spelman, Henry. De sepultura. London: Printed by Robert Young, 1641. 4to (19 cm, 7.5’’). [2], 38 pp., lacking first and last blank as usual.
$425.00

    The first edition of Sir Henry Spelman’s famous condemnation of the financial contributions demanded of mourners by their churches for burials — an influence on several pamphlets by John Milton. Spelman (1562�), one of the most important English antiquaries of the early modern period, was acquainted with Robert Cotton and a great collector of medieval documents and records published in the year of his death, his De sepultura deprecates the act of requesting money for burial rites because, as the pamphlet's first sentence says, “It is a worke of the Law of Nature and of Nations, of humane and divine Law, to bury the Dead” (p.1). The “selling of graves and the duty [tax] of buriall” he sees as Christian customs, “not heard of [. . .] among the Barbarians” (p. 2) he cites numerous medieval ecclesiastical and state sources from England and sometimes France that forbid the exaction of money for burial and blessings to the dead, as well as the opinions of major English canonists. He also quotes from church constitutions of his time, with citation of prices (separate for children under 7) requested by parsons and church-wardens for interment. Very interesting is a paragraph printed in Anglo-Saxon type, Spelman being knowledgeable in that language, which reproduces a law from the reign of Cnut.

Provenance: 17th-century autograph of “William (?)ram (?)” and three early pen trials on title-page large 20th-century armorial bookplate of Edward Jackson Barron, member of the Society of Antiquaries to front pastedown even larger 20th-century engraved bookplate of Moses H. Grossman, designed by Henri Bérengier (1881�), laid in modern manuscript date to lower blank margin of last verso.

• ESTC R19887 Kress 606 Goldsmiths’-Kress 766.1 Wing (rev. ed.) S4924. Early 20th-century half calf over marbled paper boards with author/title/date blind-stamped to spine joints strengthened and well refurbished. Title-page and last verso dust-soiled and text generally with significant age-toning but paper yet good one small pinehole-type wormhole through lower margins. A nicely provenanced, neatly bound, appealing copy of an important text on a once vexed subject. (41335)

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S olicitation for F unding a V ictorian M ental H ealth I nstitution Staffordshire General Lunatic Asylum. [drop-title] Charitable institution for the insane of Staffordshire and the adjacent counties. [Stafford: R. & W. Wright, Printers, 1850?]. Folio (32.8 cm 13"). [1] f., [1] plt.
$450.00

    • A two-page solicitation for donations to build Coton Hill Hospital, a new institution designed by architect Frederick Sandham Waller to accommodate the first two of the historical “three classes” of Staffordshire mental health patients: “Class I. — Persons of superior rank, who shall respectively contribute to the charge of maintenance according to their pecuniary abilities. Class II. — Persons in limited circumstances, though not paupers, whose payments shall be assisted and relieved out of the funds of the Charity, and the excess of payments imposed on the more affluent. Class III. — Persons being paupers, sent by Justices of the Peace for the County, pursuant to the provisions of the said Act of Parliament.”

Founded in 1814, the Asylum was by the time of this appeal overwhelmed by the number of County residents needing care, especially from Class III and, after the failure of efforts to find adjoining land allowing enlargement of facilities on the old mixed principle, decision was taken to build a new center for Class I and II patients within a half-mile's distance. The original provision that better-off patients paying according to their abilities would subsidize the care of the others was explicitly to be maintained, as per the solicitation in hand.

Conjoined is a full-page engraving of the proposed design, signed “Warrington, sc.” The completed Coton Hill opened in 1854. Its main portions have been demolished though the chapel in the engraving and a gatehouse still stand.

Provenance: “Dr. J.S. Butler” stamped at the top of p. 1 we note that there was a Dr. J.S. Butler who was a noted psychiatrist in Connecticut in the 1850s, 1860s, and 1870s.

Searches of NUC, WorldCat, and COPAC locate only one copy worldwide, although we know of one other.

• The two leaves starting to separate at top, with gentle age-toning and small chipping and closed tears to edges and fold one tear barely touches platemark and there is light offsetting to the plate from something once laid between the leaves. An attractive, unusual, and informative prospectus. (38890)

T he F ather of E nglish M edicine Sydenham, Thomas. . Methodus curandi febres, propriis observationibus superstructa. Amstelodami: Apud Gerbrandum Schagen, 1666. 12mo (14 cm, 5.5"). 112 pp.
$5000.00

    • The first Continental printing, appearing the same year as the true first (London, Impensis J. Crook), of Sydenham's first published work, being a foundational work on fevers and the beginning of his work on epidemiology. “In the later half of the seventeenth century, internal medicine took a entirely new turn in the work of one of its greatest figures, Sydenham, who revived the Hippocratic methods of observation and experience. He was one of the principal founder of epidemiology, and his clinical reputation rests upon his first hand accounts of malarial fever, scarlatina, measles, dysentery, and numerous other diseases” (Heirs of Hippocrates).

    Provenance: Unidentified 17th-century, possibly English, bookplate designed and engraved by Claude Mellan, incorporating suns in splendor and triple lozenges beneath a knightly helm.

Both 1666 editions are rare (a term we shy from using) in U.S. institutions. Searches of NUC, WorldCat, and ESTC locate only two U.S. libraries (New York Academy of Medicine, National Library of Medicine) reporting ownership of the London printing, and only four (National Library of Medicine, Yale, The Institute of the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia) of this Amsterdam edition.

Heirs of Hippocrates 352 Garrison & Morton 2198 Biblotheca Osleriana 994 (all three bibliography citations are for the 1676 edition). Contemporary brown calf with minor scuffing, gilt spine with center devices but no title or author lettering, board edges with a gilt dog-tooth roll. Bookplate as above text clean with the very occasional dot or small blot of old ink only. A very nice copy. (39913)

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P resented by the A uthor — O wned by an E minent M alpighi S cholar Testa, Antonio Giuseppe. M. Malpighius sermo habitus Bononiae. Bononiae: Ex typographia Josephi Luchesinii, [1810]. 4to (21.2 cm, 8.35"). 45, [1] pp.
$100.00

    Sole edition: Testa's lecture on the life and works of Marcello Malpighi (1628󈟊), the biologist, physician, and professor who made great advances in microscopic anatomical studies. This work is now uncommon, with a search of WorldCat finding only five U.S. institutions reporting holdings (Cornell, Yale, National Library of Medicine, Linda Hall, Wayne State).

Provenance: Front free endpaper with early inked inscription in Latin, above caption “ricevuto dall'autore” dated 24 April 1811. Half-title with later pencilled ownership inscription of Howard Bernhardt Adelmann (1898�), author of Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology and editor of The Correspondence of Marcello Malpighi. Later from the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Contemporary speckled light blue paper–covered sides with sheep shelfback, spine with gilt-stamped leather title-label and gilt roll spine and extremities rubbed, spine head and front joint with insect damage. Front pastedown with modern pencilled annotations, front free endpaper with inscription as above. Moderate foxing throughout. A very nice association copy. (40664)

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B E W I C K - I llustrated H ERBAL Thornton, Robert John. A new family herbal: Or popular account of the natures and properties of the various plants used in medicine, diet, and the arts. London: Richard Phillips (pr. by Richard Taylor & Co.), 1810. 8vo (24.1 cm, 9.5"). xvi, 901, [1 (adv.)] pp. illus.
$850.00

    First edition : “A more complete and perfect herbal than has hitherto appeared . . . intended to unite the various advantages that have been derived to science from [Andrew Duncan's] 'Edinburgh New Dispensatory'” (p. vii). Compiled by an English physician and botanist remembered for his magnificent Temple of Flora, the present pharmaceutical treatise lists and describes the uses of 283 plants illustrated with 261 wood engravings by Thomas Bewick . According to Johnston, this represents Bewick's “only attempt at botanical wood engravings,” based on designs by Peter Charles Henderson. Dr. Thornton was the author of A Grammar of Botany and The Philosophy of Botany, as well as The Temple of Flora,

    In addition to the expectable lavender, chaste tree, burdock, lungwort, etc., also present here are discussions of Chinese smilax, coffee, tea, the Peruvian bark tree, ginseng, sarsaparilla, pimento (“Jamaica Pepper”), and tobacco.

    Provenance: Front cover with gilt-stamped armorial device of Dr. Alfred Freer of Stourbridge, Worcestershire: out of a ducal coronet, an antelope's head.

• NSTC T941 Hugo, Bewick Collector, 253 Johnston, Cleveland Herbal, Botanical, and Horticultural Collections, 745 Nissen 1954 Pritzel 9238 Rohde, Old English Herbals, 224 (listing Crosby ed. only). Contemporary calf, covers framed in blind roll and single gilt fillet, spine with blind-tooled compartment decorations binding rubbed and scuffed overall, spine label now absent with traces remaining, repair work to splits in spine leather and to short tear from inner margin of front free endpaper, joints and extremities refurbished. Front free endpaper with inked ownership inscription (“C.M.W.”) dated 1912. Dedication tipped in. Pages gently age-toned with scattered foxing small inkstain to upper fore-edge of first 30 ff., barely extending onto pages. One contents leaf with short tear (just touching text, without loss) and old repair in lower outer corner. A now solid, even rather distinguished-looking copy of a desirable pharmacopeia exquisitely illustrated . (36043)

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F euding F riends & J esuit's B ark Torti, Francesco. Ad criticam dissertationem De abusu chinae chinae Mutinensibus medicis perperam objecto a clarissimo quondam viro Bernardino Ramazzino. Mutinae: Typis Bertholomaei Soliani, 1715. 8vo (23 cm, 9"). viii, 191, [1] pp.
$750.00

    • Torti, a professor in the University of Modena, was the first to systematically study the effect of cinchona in the treatment of malaria. He recommended the use of the drug for a period of eight days beyond the febrile stage of malaria and in 1712 published Therapeutice specialis ad febres quasdam perniciosas, inopinatò, ac repentè lethales, una verò china china, peculiari methodo ministrata, sanabiles, which pushed that advice and seriously displeased his senior colleague Bernardino Ramazzini, who in 1714 took Torti to task in his De abusu chinae chinae.

    The present work is Torti's reply to Ramazzini's De abusu chinae chinae. Needless to say the Modena University colleagues and friends were soon erstwhile friends.

• Blake, NLM 18th Century, p. 455 Alden & Landis 715/174 Waring, Bibliotheca therapeutica, I, 341. 18th-century quarter vellum with block-printed paper sides outside lower corner of front board bent but not breaking. Internally a very good copy. (40092)

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O wned by ( A t L east) T wo A merican D octors
T rotter on “ N ervous D iseases”
Trotter, Thomas. A view of the nervous temperament being a practical inquiry into the increasing prevalence, prevention, and treatment of those diseases commonly called nervous, bilious, stomach & liver complaints indigestion low spirits, gout, &c. Troy, NY: Wright, Goodenow, & Stockwell (colophon: Salem, NY: Pr. by J.P. Reynolds), 1808. 12mo (17.5 cm, 6.89"). 338, [2] pp.
$275.00

    First American edition of this comprehensive overview of Georgian thought on physical, mental, environmental, and inherited causes of “nervous diseases,” as well as their cures. Written by a Scottish naval surgeon (and poet), this influential treatise — first published in London in the previous year — addresses the interconnectivity of mind and body as well as questions of gender, class, and urbanization it is one of the earliest books on psychiatric concerns printed in the United States.

Provenance: Title-page with affixed printed slip of Alfred Baylies (1787�) of Taunton, MA, an eminent physician after whom a local Masonic lodge was named one text page with his now-faint inked ownership inscription. Most recently in the library of Robert L. Sadoff, M.D., one of the nation's leading forensic psychiatrists and a director of Penn's Center for Studies in Social-Legal Psychiatry, sans indicia.

• Shaw & Shoemaker 16348 Austin, Early American Medical Imprints, 1929. Contemporary mottled sheep, spine with gilt-stamped green leather title-label spine and edges rubbed, front joint just starting from head with binding sturdy and holding well. Moderate foxing throughout. One leaf with a small hole, not touching text one leaf with paper flaw running through text without affecting legibility. A solid copy in its original binding, with nice provenance. (41514)

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R eview of I mprovements in the C are & T reatment of M ental I llness Tuke, Daniel Hack. Rules and list of the present members of the Society for Improving the Condition of the Insane and the prize essay entitled Progressive changes which have taken place since the time of Pinel in the moral management of the insane and the various contrivances which have been adopted instead of mechanical restraint. London: Published for the Society by John Churchill, 1854. 8vo (23.5 cm, 9.25"). 6, 8, [2], 9�, [3] pp.
$600.00

    • Psychiatric care came naturally to Daniel Tuke (1827󈟋): His great-grandfather William Tuke and his grandfather Henry Tuke co-founded The Retreat, an institution credited with revolutionizing the treatment of the mentally ill, and his father continued the Tuke family presence at the leadership level of the hospital.

Daniel took his medical degree at Heidelberg in 1853 and then visited foreign asylums observing treatments and innovations. Returning to York, he became visiting physician to the York Retreat and the York Dispensary, lecturing also at the York School of Medicine on mental diseases.

In addition to his prize essay, this volume contains a short abstract or classification of cases contributed by Sir Alexander Morison.

Provenance: In a fine hand in ink on verso of title-page: “Presented to the Library of the Charing Cross Hospital Med. College by Jabez Hogg, Esq. 29 Sept. 1856.” Hogg was a prominent ophthalmic surgeon and for two years vice-president of the Medical Society of London. Most recently in the library of Robert Sadoff, M.D., sans indicia.

• Publisher's cloth, front cover with gilt-stamped title dust-soiled overall, spine cloth chipped and sunned, ex-library with bookplate and several rubber-stamps. Clean and sound. An important and now scarce work on the care of the mentally ill, residential treatment, mental hospitals, and physical restraint. (39786)

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An I nsider's G uide to B ATH Tunstall, James. Rambles about Bath and its neighbourhood. Bath: R.E. Peach, 1856. 12mo (17.5 cm 7"). Frontis., viii pp., [1] f., 304 pp., 13 plts, fold. map, illus.
[SOLD]

    • Tunstall was aBath booster big-time. A graduate of the University of Edinburgh, he was physician to the Eastern Dispensary of Bath and seven years resident medical officer of the Bath Hospital his guide book to his city first appeared in 1847, with subsequent editions in 1848, 1851, 1856, 1876, 1888, 1889, and 1900. Besides the locale's follies, Roman ruins, chapels, farms, overlooks, etc., he offers considerable information on the hospitals, baths, and healing wells.

This would have been a definite must for hydrotherapy and other tourists. Nicely illustrated, it bears a great map.

Provenance: Ownership signature of Mrs. Edward Brown, Belmont House, 1884. (This may well be the Mr. & Mrs. E. Brown whose “Belmont House” dates from ca. 1880 and is located in Browns Cove, Albemarle County, VA).

• Publisher's green cloth, stamped in blind on covers and lettered in gilt on spine text clean. A nice copy. (33529)

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With C arefully E ngraved & L abelled I llustrations Venette, Nicolai. . Abhandlung von Erzeugung der Menschen. Königsberg: Christoph Gottfried Eckart, 1738. 8vo (17 cm, 6.75"). Frontis., [16] ff., 546 pp., 10 leaves of plts. (various sizes).
$250.00

    • This edition not in Blake, NLM 18th Century. Contemporary half vellum with multi-color pastepaper on the boards. Internally very good. (39918)

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O rthopaedics Wilhelm, Philipp. Uber den Bruch des Schlüsselbeines und über die verschiedenen Methoden denselben zu heilen. Würzburg: Gedruckt bey Carl Wilhelm Becker, 1822. 8vo (21.5 cm, 8.5"). 87, [3] pp. 2 fold. plts.
$450.00

    • Young Dr. Wilhelm (1798�) discusses fractures of the clavicle and their treatment, and in one of the two large folding lithographic plates illustrates a device for supporting the area of the body connected by muscle and sinew to the clavicle in order to speed recovery.

Provenance: 19th-century stamp of the Medic. Chirug. Bibliothek Altenburg (on front wrapper and title-page, but NOT on plates). Most recently in the residue of the stock of the F. Thomas Heller bookselling firm (est. ca. 1928).

• Original blue-green wrappers. Waterstaining to wrappers at spine and onto covers and at rear on portions of the folding plates. Else very nice. (39793)

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H . D ., H emingway, S tein, M arianne M oore, & S o M any O thers W ere H is F RIENDS Williams, William Carlos. The autobiography of William Carlos Williams. New York: Random House, © 1951. 8vo (21.5 cm 8.5"). xiv, 402 pp.
$450.00

    Signed copy (on the front free endpaper) of the first edition, first printing of Williams' account of his life, friendships, and accomplishments.

    • Publisher's cloth, hinge (inside) cracked dust jacket rubbed and crinkled along edges with pieces lost along top and bottom edges especially at spine. Unprice-clipped. VG/G++. (33449)

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B lind A llan — S ight L ost & R estored Wilson, John. Blind Allan, a tale, from “Lights & Shadows of Scottish Life”. [Glasgow?, Edinburgh?]: Pr. for the booksellers, [ca. 1840]. 12mo. 24 pp.
$45.00

    • Chapbook 󈬵” printed below “printed for the booksellers” on title-page. Wilson's “Lights and shadows” first appeared in 1822.

• NSTC 2W25743. Removed from a bound volume. Very good condition. (37138)


Geography

Keokuk is located at 40°24′9″N 91°23′40″W  /  40.40250°N 91.39444°W  / 40.40250 -91.39444 (40.402525, -91.394372). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10.58 square miles (27.40 km 2 ), of which, 9.13 square miles (23.65 km 2 ) of it is land and 1.45 square miles (3.76 km 2 ) is water. The lowest point in the state of Iowa is 480 feet (150 m) located at the confluence of the Des Moines River with the Mississippi just southwest of Keokuk.

Climate

Keokuk has a humid continental climate. Keokuk is also known for having recorded the highest temperature ever in the state of Iowa with a temperature of 118 °F (48 °C) recorded here on July 20, 1934.

Climate data for Keokuk, IA
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 70
(21.1)
75
(23.9)
87
(30.6)
92
(33.3)
102
(38.9)
104
(40)
118
(47.8)
110
(43.3)
100
(37.8)
94
(34.4)
82
(27.8)
70
(21.1)
118
(47.8)
Average high °F (°C) 32
(0)
38
(3.3)
50
(10)
62
(16.7)
73
(22.8)
82
(27.8)
87
(30.6)
85
(29.4)
77
(25)
66
(18.9)
50
(10)
37
(2.8)
62
(16.7)
Average low °F (°C) 15
(-9.4)
20
(-6.7)
30
(-1.1)
42
(5.6)
52
(11.1)
62
(16.7)
67
(19.4)
65
(18.3)
56
(13.3)
45
(7.2)
33
(0.6)
21
(-6.1)
42
(5.6)
Record low °F (°C) −22
(-30)
−19
(-28.3)
−11
(-23.9)
15
(-9.4)
33
(0.6)
44
(6.7)
50
(10)
44
(6.7)
32
(0)
20
(-6.7)
−3
(-19.4)
−20
(-28.9)
−22
(-30)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.29
(32.8)
1.42
(36.1)
2.65
(67.3)
3.61
(91.7)
5.38
(136.7)
3.92
(99.6)
3.99
(101.3)
3.20
(81.3)
3.94
(100.1)
3.04
(77.2)
2.98
(75.7)
1.99
(50.5)
37.41
(950.2)
Snowfall inches (cm) 6.00
(15.24)
4.80
(12.19)
2.90
(7.37)
1.00
(2.54)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
1.30
(3.3)
4.90
(12.45)
20.90
(53.09)
Source: http://www.intellicast.com/Local/History.aspx?location=USIA0434


Ground Stone Artifacts

A wide range of prehistoric artifacts were formed by pecking, grinding, or polishing one stone with another. Ground stone tools are usually made of basalt, rhyolite, granite, or other macrocrystalline igneous or metamorphic rocks, whose coarse structure makes them ideal for grinding other materials, including plants and other stones. Native Americans used cobbles found along streams and in exposures of glacial till or outwash to produce a variety ground stone artifacts. The process by which ground stone tools are manufactured is a laborintensive , time-consuming method of repeated pecking and grinding with a harder stone, followed by polishing with sand, using water as a lubricant.

In North America, axes, celts , gouges, mauls, plummets, and bannerstones began to appear early in the Archaic period, made from hard igneous or metamorphic rocks. Cobbles with small shallow cupped depressions, called anvil stones or nutting stones, also came into use during the Archaic period. Discarded ground stone tools sometimes later became convenient raw material for use in stone boiling, lining roasting pits, or ringing hearths, thus ending their useful life as fire cracked rocks.

To facilitate hafting, axes were grooved, either completely around the four faces of the tool, or on three of the four faces. These groove patterns thus give rise to the terms “full” and “threequarter” grooved axes.

Rarely, grooves were placed only on the two flattened faces of an axe in the Midwest such tools are known as Keokuk axes. Celts are similar to axes but lack the groove and were hafted with the bit perpendicular to the axis of the handle, rather than paralleling it, as with an axe . Axes, celts , gouges, and mauls are generally considered to be woodworking tools and are often found in areas that were once forested or still retain the native tree cover.

During the Late Archaic, Woodland, and Late Prehistoric periods ground stone technology began to be applied to softer sedimentary and metamorphic rocks for making other kinds of artifacts. For example, limestone was used for making pipes, hematite for celts , sandstone for arrow shaft abraders, and small bowls were shaped from steatite.

Catlinite is a relatively soft, reddish metamorphic rock found in southwestern Minnesota that is wellknown for use in calumet and disc-bowl pipes by Plains tribes. With the development of horticulture came the need for tools to process grain, and large flat blocks of quartzite or granite were pecked and ground into dishshaped grinding stones called metates to grind corn or other seeds into meal.

Some ground stone tools were created incidentally by abrasion with other tools. Manos , for example, are handheld stones used in conjunction with metates or grinding slabs, and develop their ground surfaces through wear. Cobbles used as hammerstones in flintknapping and ground stone pecking retain the scars developed from use, often appearing as pitted and flattened areas along their perimeters.

Ground stone technology also was used to produce artifacts of personal adornment. Gorgets, beads, and ear spools enhanced the appearance of the bearer and perhaps functioned as status symbols. Such artifacts were drilled to permit suspension from a cord by spinning a narrow pointed stone, hardened stick, or bone between the hands against the stone, using sand as an abrasive. The hole was drilled part way through on one side of the object and the remainder of the hole was drilled from the opposite side.

The drilling process results in a biconical hole that is narrowest near the middle of the object. Larger-diameter holes could be drilled using a hollow bone or reed along with sand and water. A by-product of the hollow drill was a narrow cylindrical core of the parent rock. Such cores of drilled ground stone artifacts have been found on archaeological sites.

A few very special artifacts were used in the ritual or ceremonial realms of certain prehistoric groups. At village sites of northwestern Iowa’s Late Prehistoric Mill Creek culture, small lens-shaped quartz or basalt discoidals and thunderbird effigies of limestone and catlinite have been found. The discoidals resemble old style ceramic or brass doorknobs in size and shape and are sometimes simply referred to as “doorknobs” by artifact collectors. Larger, biconcave stone discs four to five inches in diameter called chunkey stones were used by Mississippian societies of the southeastern part of the continent in a game of the same name.

Similar items have been found on Late Prehistoric Oneota villages in northwestern Iowa. Along with grinding and drill for pipes, catlinite also lends itself well to fine line engraving with a sharp tool, and a few small catlinite tablets engraved with complex symbols and pictographs have turned up on northwestern Iowa Oneota sites.


It’s Built with King’s

Whatever aesthetic you’re seeking, King’s Material can offer the knowledge and products to build the perfect patio. With natural stone, concrete and pavers, in addition to fire pits and water features, we’re certain we can meet your needs. For your patio oasis, it’s built with King’s. View Our Patio Gallery

Whether you’re looking to build a decorative retaining wall or something meant to retain a heavy load, King’s Material provides products and experience for your project. With multiple products offering many aesthetic looks, we’re ready to build what you need, from backyard retaining walls to rock retaining walls or simply retaining wall blocks to improve what’s already there. For the best in retaining walls, it’s built with King’s. View Our Retaining Wall Gallery


King’s Material has the stone products that are the right fit for your project. Cultured Stone, or stone veneer, enhances and elevates the appearance of your home’s exterior. With King’s Material products, our professional staff can help find the quality that’s best for you. For stone projects, it’s built with King’s. View our Stone Gallery.

When you’re looking to build your next project, you want to know the materials will last while also being aesthetically pleasing. At King’s Material, our experts work closely with architects to match our durable, quality products to their artistic vision. For architectural masonry products with a variety of surface appearances, it’s built with King’s. View Our Masonry Gallery Want a quiet getaway? Or perhaps you want to extend your space for entertaining? King’s Material specializes in building outdoor living spaces. We work with you to define your project and offer the key elements to bring it to life. From landscaping to lighting and pergolas to brick ovens, King’s Material has a large range of products for the perfect, welcoming outdoor space. Our staff can provide ideas or get you the right materials to build the space you want. For outdoor living, it’s built with King’s. View Our Outdoor Living Gallery King’s Material knows concrete. We specialize in quality concrete that’s made to last. Whether it’s concrete driveways, concrete retaining walls or concrete block, King’s Material can supply the best-quality option for your project. So it not only lasts long, but looks good now and in the future. You can often spot our red ready-mix trucks in front of many community projects, including local schools, museums and retail developments. For concrete jobs, it’s built with King’s. View Our Concrete Gallery

Keokuk II CM-6 - History

Interested in joining the GWA? Here is a list of vendors that carry a wide range of gear to help you put your kit together. If interested in a (unit), feel free to contact the unit commander of that unit for suggestions on unit-preferred vendors. Authenticity Regulations may vary from unit to unit, so before any purchases it is always a good idea to check with unit commanders.

Please click on images below to learn more about each individual vendor.

Alexander and Sons Restorations restore WW1 helmets.

Great War Militaria (GWM) has a variety of unique items and is still the best place to find those great "first person" items that can set you apart from others.

Hessen Antique offers original and reproduction Militaria including reproduction German Pickelhaube and a full line of German made caps.

Lost Battalions has been one of the most accurate reproduction houses in WWII reenacting. Now making WWI German uniforms after aquiring the old New Columbia patterns, they are taking orders. Please check them out.

No Man's Land Militaria offers a great variety from equipment, to trench-art and even photographs.

Reichslieder is a company specializes in WW1 and ww2 Marching Music, War Songs and Patriotic Songs.

Skirmish Magazine is the world's leading "Multi-period" reenactment & living history magazine.

Tommy's Pack Fillers has a wide variety of Great War repro items as supplied to museums, enthusiasts world wide and as WW1 props for motion pictures, TV films and WW1 period theatrical productions.

What Price Glory & Jerry Lee have been supplying the British & Commonwealth reenactors for a very long time. Check out WPG for all of your American and British uniform items.

Please contact us if you need more information regarding vendors or you would like to be included on the list of vendors. Contact us here.


Production and Variants

Moving into production with the F6F-3 in late 1942, Grumman quickly showed that the new fighter was easy to build. Employing around 20,000 workers, Grumman's plants began to produce Hellcats at a rapid rate. When Hellcat production ended in November 1945, a total of 12,275 F6Fs had been built. During the course of production, a new variant, the F6F-5, was developed with production commencing in April 1944. This possessed a more powerful R-2800-10W engine, a more streamlined cowling, and numerous other upgrades including a flat armored-glass front panel, spring-loaded control tabs, and a reinforced tail section.

The aircraft was also modified for use as the F6F-3/5N night fighter. This variant carried the AN/APS-4 radar in a fairing built into the starboard wing. Pioneering naval night fighting, F6F-3Ns claimed their first victories in November 1943. With the arrival of the F6F-5 in 1944, a night fighter variant was developed from the type. Employing the same AN/APS-4 radar system as the F6F-3N, the F6F-5N also saw some changes to the aircraft's armament with some replacing the inboard .50 cal machine guns with a pair of 20 mm cannon. In addition to the night fighter variants, some F6F-5s were fitted with camera equipment to serve as reconnaissance aircraft (F6F-5P).​


FURTHER READING

Black Hawk. Black Hawk: An Autobiography. Edited by Donald Jackson. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1955.

Eby, Cecil D. "That Disgraceful Affair:" The Black Hawk War. New York: W. W. Norton, 1973.

Gurko, Miriam. Indian America: The Black Hawk War. New York: Crowell, 1970.

Hagan, William T. The Sac and the Fox Indians. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1958.

Weeks, Philip. Farewell, My Nation: The American Indian and the United States, 1820 – 1890. Arlington Heights, IL: H. Davidson, 1990.

i touched the goose quill to the treaty . . . not knowing, however, that by that act i consented to give away my village.

black hawk, sac indian leader, 1831


MCLAUGHLIN Genealogy

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Watch the video: The Alleged Grave of Chief Keokuk - Keokuk, IA


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