John L. Lockwood SwStr - History

John L. Lockwood SwStr - History


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John L. Lockwood SwStr

John L. Lockwood

(SwStr: t. 180; 1. 114'; b. 24'; dr. 6'6"; s. 11 k.; cpb 30;
a. 1 80-pdr. rifle, 1 12-pdr. rifle; 1 12-pdr.sb)

John L. Lockwood built at Athens, N.Y., in 1854; was purchased at New York City 1 September 1861, and commissioned at Washington 21 September, Acting Master William F. North in command.

John L. Lockwood was assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron 25 September with whom she steadfastly served throughout the war. She took station off the New York River 30 September and remained there on blockade duty until ordered to Hampton Roads to guard Congress and Cumberland. With Shawsheen she shelled Virginia infantry on Yorktown Road a few miles above Camp Butler 23 November.

The following day , John L. Lockwood departed Hampton Roads for repairs at Baltimore, and she decommissioned upon arrival 25 November. Back in fighting trim, she recommissioned 6 December and returned to Hampton Roads. Assisted by Morse, she engaged three Confederate batteries on Sewell's Point 29 December.

John L. Lockwood was ordered to Hatteras Inlet 2 February 1862 to take part in combined operations which struck the Confederacy with heavy and costly blows wherever water reached within the North Carolina Sounds. She was with Flag Offlcer Goldsborough during operations against Roanoke Island 7 February bombarding Confederate positions with deadly effective Sre. The next day with eight other ships she cut the chain connecting two vessels which obstructed the channel, thus clearing a passage for the Union ships into Albemarle Sound. This victory and the follow-up operations in the sounds severed Norfolk's main supply lines, secured the North Carolina coast, diverted important strength from the main Confederate Armies, and weakened the South's ability to resist at sea. At the end of the fighting, Captain Alex Murray who commanded Goldborough's second column praised John L. Lockwood for being "conspicuously in the foreground throughout the bombardment."

With Roanoak Island secure, the fleet moved on to Elizabeth City, N.C., to destroy Confederate gunboats and interrupt the South's canal communications to the north of Albermarle Sound. The next major amphihious operation, the attack on Confederate batteries on the Neuse River 13 March, resulted in Union occupation of New Bern, N.C., on the 14th. On 23 April, with Whitehead and Putnam, John L. Lockwood blocked the mouth of the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal near Elizabeth City, N.C., sinking a schooner and other obstructions inside the waterway.

She remained in North Carolina's inland waters patrolling the innumerable inlets and streams and assisting Army units ashore until sailing from Hatteras Inlet for repairs at Hampton Roads 3 September 1863. Refitting completed, John L. Lockwood departed Norfolk Navy Yard 8 January 1864 and arrived New Bern 14 January to resume duty in the sounds. She captured sloop Twiligh't at Elizabeth City, N.C. During most of her further service she was stationed at New Bern where after the war she decommissioned 23 May 1865. She was towed to Baltimore late in May and thence taken to Washington 27 July. John L. Lockwood was sold at Washington to Mr. Crosset of New York 15 September 1865 and redocumented Henr1y Smit7' 3 April 1866. The Army purchased and renamed her Chester A. Arthur 30 June 1876.


USS Lockwood

USS Lockwood (FF-1064) was the 13th Knox-class destroyer escort, redesignated a frigate in 1975. She was named for Charles A. Lockwood.

  • 2 × CE 1200psi boilers
  • 1 Westinghouse geared turbine
  • 1 shaft, 35,000 shp (26,000 kW)
  • AN/SPS-40 Air Search Radar
  • AN/SPS-67 Surface Search Radar
  • AN/SQS-26CX [1]Sonar
  • AN/SQQ-17A(V)2 sonobuoy system
  • AN/SQR-18 Towed array sonar system
  • AN/SQS-35 IVDS [1] Gun Fire Control System
  • one Mk-16 8 cell missile launcher for ASROC and Harpoon missiles
  • one Mk-42 5-inch/54 caliber gun from four single tube launchers)
  • one Mk-25 BPDMS launcher for Sea Sparrow missiles, later replaced by one Phalanx CIWS

John L. Lockwood was ordered to Hatteras Inlet 2 February 1862 to take part in combined operations which struck the Confederacy with heavy and costly blows wherever water reached within the North Carolina Sounds. She was with Flag Officer Goldsborough during operations against Roanoke Island 7 February bombarding Confederate positions with deadly effective fire. The next day with eight other ships she cut the chain connecting two vessels which obstructed the channel, thus clearing a passage for the Union ships into Albemarle Sound. This victory and the follow-up operations in the sounds severed Norfolk's main supply lines, secured the North Carolina coast, diverted important strength from the main Confederate Armies, and weakened the South's ability to resist at sea. At the end of the fighting, Captain Alex Murray who commanded Goldborough's second column praised John L. Lockwood for being "conspicuously in the foreground throughout the bombardment."

With Roanoak Island secure, the fleet moved on to Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to destroy Confederate gunboats and interrupt the South's canal communications to the north of Albemarle Sound. The next major amphibious operation, the attack on Confederate batteries on the Neuse River 13 March, resulted in Union occupation of New Bern, North Carolina, on the 14th. On 23 April, with USS Whitehead and USS General Putnam, John L. Lockwood, blocked the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Canal near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, sinking a schooner and other obstructions inside the waterway.

She remained in North Carolina's inland waters patrolling the innumerable inlets and streams and assisting Army units ashore until sailing from Hatteras Inlet for repairs at Hampton Roads 3 September 1863. Refitting completed, John L. Lockwood departed Norfolk Navy Yard 8 January 1864 and arrived New Bern 14 January to resume duty in the sounds. She captured sloop Twilight at Elizabeth City, North Carolina. During most of her further service she was stationed at New Bern where after the war she decommissioned 23 May 1865.


North Carolina coastal operations

With Roanoak Island secure, the fleet moved on to Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to destroy Confederate gunboats and interrupt the South's canal communications to the north of Albemarle Sound. The next major amphibious operation, the attack on Confederate batteries on the Neuse River 13 March, resulted in Union occupation of New Bern, North Carolina, on the 14th. On 23 April, with USS Whitehead and USS General Putnam, John L. Lockwood, blocked the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Canal near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, sinking a schooner and other obstructions inside the waterway.

She remained in North Carolina's inland waters patrolling the innumerable inlets and streams and assisting Army units ashore until sailing from Hatteras Inlet for repairs at Hampton Roads 3 September 1863. Refitting completed, John L. Lockwood departed Norfolk Navy Yard 8 January 1864 and arrived New Bern 14 January to resume duty in the sounds. She captured sloop Twilight at Elizabeth City, North Carolina. During most of her further service she was stationed at New Bern where after the war she decommissioned 23 May 1865.


Lockwood History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient history of the Lockwood name begins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the family resided in the place called Lockwood that was in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The surname Lockwood is a habitation name that was originally derived from the Old English words loca and wudu, meaning enclosure and wood. [1] Therefore the original bearers of the surname lived in or near a forest in Yorkshire.

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Early Origins of the Lockwood family

The surname Lockwood was first found in West Yorkshire at Lockwood, a chapelry, in the parish of Almondbury. The village is a rural suburb to the town of Huddersfield and is located in the vale of the river Holme.

One reference claims Lockwood was originally called North Crosland and part of the Crosland family estate but was taken over by the Lockwood family after a series of disputes between the both families.

However, this claim is rather dubious and should be questioned as the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 list Willelmus de Lokewod and Thomas de Lockewod holding lands at that time. [2] Lockwood is also a civil parish in the unitary authority of Redcar & Cleveland in North Yorkshire.

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Early History of the Lockwood family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lockwood research. Another 90 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Lockwood History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Lockwood Spelling Variations

Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Lockwood include Lockwood, Lockward and others.

Early Notables of the Lockwood family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Lockwood Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lockwood migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Lockwood Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Edmund Lockwood and his wife Elizabeth and child settled in Salem Massachusetts in 1630
  • Edmund Lockwood, who landed in New England in 1631 [3]
  • Anthony Lockwood, who arrived in Maryland in 1665 [3]
  • Robert Lockwood, who landed in Maryland in 1666 [3]
Lockwood Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Susannah Lockwood, who landed in Virginia in 1713 [3]
  • Joshua Lockwood, who arrived in America in 1794 [3]
Lockwood Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Lockwood, who landed in New York, NY in 1816 [3]
  • S Lockwood, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [3]
  • J R Lockwood, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [3]
  • J Lockwood, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850 [3]
  • J D Lockwood, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850 [3]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Lockwood migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Lockwood Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Amos Lockwood U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 374 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [4]
  • Mrs. Mary Lockwood U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 534 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [4]
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Lockwood U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 487 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [4]
  • Miss Phebe Lockwood U.E. (b. 1782), aged 1 who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 39 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [4]
  • Miss Sarah Lockwood U.E. (b. 1772), aged 11 who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 588 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [4]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Lockwood migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Lockwood Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Richard Lockwood, British Convict who was convicted in York, Yorkshire, England for life for house breaking, transported aboard the "Commodore Hayes" in April 1823, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [5]
  • Mr. John Lockwood, English convict who was convicted in North Riding, Yorkshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Aurora" on 3rd November 1833, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • Mr. Charles Lockwood, English convict who was convicted in Suffolk, England for 10 years, transported aboard the "Canton" on 20th September 1839, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [7]
  • Mr. William Lockwood, English convict who was convicted in Suffolk, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Canton" on 20th September 1839, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [7]
  • Joseph Lockwood, aged 23, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship "Sea Queen" [8]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Lockwood migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:


John L. Wilson

John Lockwood Wilson (August 7, 1850 – November 6, 1912) was an American lawyer and politician from the U.S. states of Indiana and Washington. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1889–1895) and U.S. Senate (1895–1899)

Wilson was born in Crawfordsville, Indiana, the son of James Wilson, a U.S. Representative, and his wife, Emma (Ingersoll) Wilson, and was the elder brother of Henry Lane Wilson. He attended the common schools and was a messenger during the American Civil War. Wilson graduated from Wabash College in Crawfordsville in 1874 and studied law, being admitted to the bar in 1878. He commenced practice in Crawfordsville and in 1880 was elected to the Indiana House of Representatives. He was appointed by President Chester A. Arthur as receiver of public moneys at Spokane Falls and Colfax in Washington Territory, serving in this position from 1882 to 1887.

Upon the admission of Washington into the Union, Wilson was elected as a Republican in the 1888 elections to the House of Representatives as the representative from Washington's at-large congressional district for the 51st United States Congress. Wilson was re-elected in 1890 and 1892 to the 52nd and 53rd Congresses, serving from November 20, 1889, to February 18, 1895, when he resigned to become a Senator.

Wilson was elected as a Republican to the Senate on February 1, 1895, to fill the vacancy in the term commencing March 4, 1893, but did not assume his senatorial duties until February 19, 1895. He lost his bid for reelection to Addison G. Foster in 1898 and left office on March 4, 1899. While in the Senate, Wilson was chairman of the Committee on Indian Depredations during the 54th and 55th Congresses.


Contents

Margaret Mary Day Lockwood was born on 15 September 1916 in Karachi, British India, to Henry Francis Lockwood, an English administrator of a railway company, and his Scottish third wife Margaret Eveline Waugh. [1] She returned to England in 1920 with her mother, brother 'Lyn' and half-brother Frank, and a further half-sister 'Fay' joined them the following year, but her father remained in Karachi, visiting them infrequently. She also had another half-brother, John, from her father's first marriage, brought up by his mother in Britain. [2] Lockwood attended Sydenham High School for girls, and a ladies' school in Kensington, London. [1]

She began studying for the stage at an early age at the Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts, and made her debut in 1928, at the age of 12, at the Holborn Empire where she played a fairy in A Midsummer Night's Dream. In December of the following year, she appeared at the Scala Theatre in the pantomime The Babes in the Wood. [1] In 1932 she appeared at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in Cavalcade.

In 1933, Lockwood enrolled at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, where she was seen by a talent scout and signed to a contract. [1] In June 1934 she played Myrtle in House on Fire at the Queen's Theatre, and on 22 August 1934 appeared as Margaret Hamilton in Gertrude Jenning's play Family Affairs when it premiered at the Ambassadors Theatre Helene Ferber in Repayment at the Arts Theatre in January 1936 Trixie Drew in Henry Bernard's play Miss Smith at the Duke of York's Theatre in July 1936 and back at the Queen's in July 1937 as Ann Harlow in Ann's Lapse.

Films Edit

Lockwood entered films in 1934, and in 1935 she appeared in the film version of Lorna Doone. For this, British Lion put her under contract for £500 a year for the first year, going up to £750 a year for the second year. [3]

For British Lion she was in The Case of Gabriel Perry (1935), then was in Honours Easy (1935) with Greta Nissen and Man of the Moment (1935) with Douglas Fairbanks Jnr. These were standard ingénue roles. She was the female love interest in Midshipman Easy (1935), directed by Carol Reed, who would become crucial to Lockwood's career. She had the lead in Someday (1935), a quota quickie directed by Michael Powell and in Jury's Evidence (1936), directed by Ralph Ince.

Lockwood had a small role in The Amateur Gentleman (1936), another with Fairbanks. Her profile rose when she appeared opposite Maurice Chevalier in The Beloved Vagabond (1936) [4]

She followed it with Irish for Luck (1936) and The Street Singer (1937). She had a small role in Who's Your Lady Friend? (1937), again for Carol Reed and was in Melody and Romance (1937).

Gaumont British Edit

Gaumont British were making a film version of the novel Doctor Syn, starring George Arliss and Anna Lee with director Roy William Neill and producer Edward Black. Lee dropped out and was replaced by Lockwood. Lockwood so impressed the studio with her performance – particularly Black, who became a champion of hers – she signed a three-year contract with Gainsborough Pictures in June 1937. [5] [6] [7] This was at £4,000 a year. [8]

For Black and director Robert Stevenson she supported Will Fyffe in Owd Bob (1938), opposite John Loder.

British Stardom: Bank Holiday and The Lady Vanishes Edit

Lockwood then had her best chance to-date, being given the lead in Bank Holiday, directed by Carol Reed and produced by Black. [9] This movie was a hit and launched Lockwood as a star. She called it "my first really big picture. with a beautifully written script and a wonderful part for me." [8] Gaumont increased her contract from three years to six. [10]

Even more popular was her next movie, The Lady Vanishes, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, produced by Black and co-starring Michael Redgrave. Lockwood called it "one of the films I have enjoyed most in all my career." [11] Hitchcock was greatly impressed by Lockwood, telling the press:

She has an undoubted gift in expressing her beauty in terms of emotion, which is exceptionally well suited to the camera. Allied to this is the fact that she photographs more than normally easily, and has an extraordinary insight in getting the feel of her lines, to live within them, so to speak, as long as the duration of the picture lasts. It is not too much to expect that, in Margaret Lockwood, the British picture industry has a possibility of developing a star of hitherto un-anticipated possibilities. [12]

She followed this with A Girl Must Live, a musical comedy about chorus girls for Black and Reed. It was one of a series of films made by Gaumont aimed at the US market. [13] According to Filmink Lockwood's "speciality [now] was playing a bright young thing who got up to mischief, usually by accident rather than design, and she often got to drive the action." [14]

American films Edit

Gaumont British had distribution agreements with 20th Century Fox in the US and they expressed an interest in borrowing Lockwood for some films. She travelled to Los Angeles and was put to work supporting Shirley Temple in Susannah of the Mounties (1939), set in Canada, opposite Randolph Scott. She was borrowed by Paramount for Rulers of the Sea (1939), with Will Fyffe and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. [15] Paramount indicated a desire to use Lockwood in more films [16] but she decided to go home. [17] [18]

Return to Britain Edit

Lockwood returned to Britain in June 1939. She was meant to make film versions of Rob Roy and The Blue Lagoon [19] but both projects were cancelled with the advent of war. Instead, she played the role of Jenny Sunley, the self-centred, frivolous wife of Michael Redgrave's character in The Stars Look Down for Carol Reed. Lockwood later admitted "I was far from being reconciled to my role of the unpleasant girl and everyone treated me warily. But as the film progressed I found myself working with Carol Reed and Michael Redgrave again and gradually I was fascinated to see what I could put into the part." [10]

She did another with Reed, Night Train to Munich (1940), an attempt to repeat the success of The Lady Vanishes with the same screenwriters (Launder and Gilliat) and characters of Charters and Caldicott. Rex Harrison was the male star. This started filming in November 1939. [20]

She was meant to be reunited with Reed and Redgrave in Girl in the News (1940) but Redgrave dropped out and was replaced by Barry K. Barnes: Black produced and Sidney Gilliat wrote the script. Quiet Wedding (1941) was a comedy directed by Anthony Asquith. She was meant to appear in Hatter's Castle but fell pregnant and had to drop out. [21] Her return to acting was Alibi (1942), a thriller which she called "anything but a success. a bad film." [22]

In September 1943 Variety estimated her salary at being US$24,000 per picture (equivalent to $289,000 in 2019). [23]

The Man in Grey Edit

Lockwood was well established as a middle-tier name. What made her a front rank star was The Man in Grey (1943), the first of what would be known as the Gainsborough melodramas. Lockwood wanted to play the part of Clarissa, but producer Edward Black cast her as the villainous Hesther. [24] She was featured alongside Phyllis Calvert, James Mason and Stewart Granger for director Leslie Arliss. The film was a massive hit, one of the biggest in 1943 Britain, and made all four lead actors into top stars – at the end of the year, exhibitors voted Lockwood the seventh most popular British star at the box office.

She appeared in two comedies for Black: Dear Octopus (1943) with Michael Wilding from a play by Dodie Smith, which Lockwood felt was a backward step [25] and Give Us the Moon (1944), with Vic Oliver directed by Val Guest. Much more popular than either of these was another melodrama with Arliss and Granger, Love Story (1944), where she played a terminally ill pianist.

Lockwood was reunited with James Mason in A Place of One's Own (1945), playing a housekeeper possessed by the spirit of a dead girl, but the film was not a success. I'll Be Your Sweetheart (1945) was a musical with Guest and Vic Oliver.

The Wicked Lady Edit

Lockwood had the biggest success of her career to-date with the title role in The Wicked Lady (1945), opposite Mason and Michael Rennie for director Arliss. The film was the most popular movie at the British box office in 1946. [26] In 1946, Lockwood gained the Daily Mail National Film Awards First Prize for most popular British film actress. However she was soon to suffer what has been called "a cold streak of poor films which few other stars have endured." [14]

She was offered the role of Bianca in The Magic Bow but disliked the part and turned it down. Instead she was a murderess in Bedelia (1946), which did not perform as well, although it was popular in Britain. [27]

Contract with Rank Edit

In July 1946, Lockwood signed a six-year contract with Rank to make two movies a year. The first of these was Hungry Hill (1947), an expensive adaptation of the novel by Daphne du Maurier which was not the expected success at the box office.

More popular was Jassy (1947), the seventh biggest hit at the British box office in 1947. [28] It was the last of "official" Gainsborough melodramas – the studio had come under the control of J. Arthur Rank who disliked the genre.

She was a warden in The White Unicorn (1947), a melodrama from the team of Harold Huth and John Corfield. Rank wanted to star her in a film about Mary Magdalene but Lockwood was unhappy with the script. [29] She refused to appear in Roses for Her Pillow (which became Once Upon a Dream) and was put on suspension. [30] "I was sick of getting mediocre parts and poor scripts," she later wrote. "Since 1945 I had been sick of it. there had been little or no improvement to me in the films I was being offered." [31] She later said "I was having fun being a rebel." [32]

During her suspension she went on a publicity tour for Rank. [33] She also appeared in an acclaimed TV production of Pygmalion (1948). [34] then went off suspension when she made a comedy for Corfield and Huth, Look Before You Love (1948).

Lockwood had a change of pace with the comedy Cardboard Cavalier (1949), with Lockwood playing Nell Gwyn opposite Sid Field. The film was a critical and box-office disappointment. "I was terribly distressed when I read the press notices of the film", wrote Lockwood. [35]

Lockwood was announced to play Becky Sharpe in a version of Vanity Fair but it was not made. [36]

Lockwood was in the melodrama Madness of the Heart (1949), but the film was not a particular success. When a proposed film about Elisabeth of Austria was cancelled, [37] she returned to the stage in a record-breaking national tour of Noël Coward's Private Lives (1949) [38] and then played the title role in productions of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan in 1949 and 1950. She also performed in a pantomime of Cinderella for the Royal Film performance with Jean Simmons Lockwood called this "the jolliest show in which I have ever taken part." [39]

She returned to film-making after an 18-month absence to star in Highly Dangerous (1950), a comic thriller in the vein of Lady Vanishes written expressly for her by Eric Ambler and directed by Roy Ward Baker. [40] [41] It was not popular. Rank was to put her in an adaptation of Ann Veronica by H. G. Wells but the film was postponed. [42] She turned down the female lead in The Browning Version, and a proposed sequel to The Wicked Lady, The Wicked Lady's Daughter, was never made. [43]

Eventually her contract with Rank ended and she played Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion at the Edinburgh Festival of 1951. [44]

Herbert Wilcox Edit

In 1952, Lockwood signed a two picture a year contract with Herbert Wilcox at $112,000 a year, making her the best paid actress in British films. [45] Lockwood said Wilcox and his wife Anna Neagle promised from signing the contract "I was never allowed to forget that I was a really bright and dazzling star on their horizon. They were going to look after me as no one else had done before. They did. And I loved it." [46]

The association began well with Trent's Last Case (1952) with Michael Wilding and Orson Welles which was popular. She appeared on TV in Ann Veronica and another TV adaptation of the Shaw play Captain Brassbound's Conversion (1953). [47]

Her next two films for Wilcox were commercial disappointments: Laughing Anne (1953) and Trouble in the Glen (1954). She made no more films with Wilcox who called her "a director's joy who can shade a performance or a character with computer accuracy" but admitted their collaboration "did not come off." [48]

Lockwood returned to the stage in Spider's Web (1954) by Agatha Christie, expressly written for her. [49]

She then appeared in a thriller, Cast a Dark Shadow (1955) with Dirk Bogarde for director Lewis Gilbert. Gilbert later said "It was reasonably successful, but, by then, Margaret had been in several really bad films and her name on a picture was rather counter-productive." [50]

Television Edit

As her popularity waned in the post war years, she returned to occasional performances on the West End stage and appeared on television her television debut was in 1948 when she played Eliza Doolittle [51]

She was in a BBC adaptation of Christie's Spider's Web (1955), Janet Green's Murder Mistaken (1956), Dodie Smith's Call It a Day (1956) and Arnold Bennett's The Great Adventure (1958).

She had the lead in a TV series The Royalty (1957–1958) and appeared regularly on TV anthology series. She played an aging West End star attempting a comeback in The Human Jungle with Herbert Lom (1965). She starred in another series The Flying Swan (1965).

Later career Edit

Her subsequent long-running West End hits include an all-star production of Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband (1965–66, in which she played the villainous Mrs Cheveley), W. Somerset Maugham's Lady Frederick (1970), Relative Values (Noël Coward revival, 1973) and the thrillers Signpost to Murder (1962) and Double Edge (1975).

In 1969 she starred as barrister Julia Stanford in the TV play Justice is a Woman. This inspired the Yorkshire Television series Justice, which ran for three seasons (39 episodes) from 1971 to 1974, and featured her real-life partner, John Stone, as fictional boyfriend Dr Ian Moody. Lockwood's role as the feisty Harriet Peterson won her Best Actress Awards from the TV Times (1971) and The Sun (1973). In 1975, film director Bryan Forbes persuaded her out of an apparent retirement from feature films to play the role of the Stepmother in last feature film The Slipper and the Rose. This film also included the final appearance of Edith Evans and one of the later appearances of Kenneth More.

Her last professional appearance was as Queen Alexandra in Royce Ryton's stage play Motherdear (Ambassadors Theatre, 1980).

Margaret Lockwood was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) [52] in the 1981 New Year Honours.

Margaret Lockwood was apparently the inspiration for Sean Pertwee's death scene in Dog Soldiers. When asked about this, he referred to the foul grimace her character Julia Stanford readily expressed in the TV play Justice Is a Woman.

She was the subject of This Is Your Life in December 1963. She was a guest on the BBC's radio show Desert Island Discs on 25 April 1951.

Lockwood married Rupert Leon in 1937 (divorced in 1950). [53] She lived her final years in seclusion in Kingston upon Thames, dying at the Cromwell Hospital, Kensington, London, from cirrhosis of the liver, aged 73. Her body was cremated at Putney Vale Crematorium. She was survived by her daughter, the actress Julia Lockwood (née Margaret Julia Leon, 1941–2019).

Year Title Role Director Notes Ref
1934 Lorna Doone Annie Ridd Basil Dean [54]
1935 The Case of Gabriel Perry Mildred Perry Albert de Courville [54]
Honours Easy Ann Herbert Brenon [54]
Man of the Moment Vera Monty Banks [54]
Midshipman Easy Donna Agnes Carol Reed [54]
Someday Emily Michael Powell [54]
1936 Jury's Evidence Betty Stanton Ralph Ince [54]
The Amateur Gentleman Georgina Huntstanton Thornton Freeland [54]
The Beloved Vagabond Blanquette Curtis Bernhardt [54]
Irish for Luck Ellen O'Hare Arthur B. Woods [54]
1937 The Street Singer Jenny Green Jean de Marguenat [54]
Who's Your Lady Friend? Mimi Carol Reed [54]
Doctor Syn Imogene Clegg Roy William Neill [54]
Melody and Romance Margaret Williams Maurice Elvey [54]
1938 Owd Bob Jeannie McAdam Robert Stevenson To the Victor [54]
Bank Holiday Catherine Lawrence Carol Reed Three on a Weekend [54]
The Lady Vanishes Iris Henderson Alfred Hitchcock [54]
1939 Susannah of the Mounties Vicky Standing Walter Lang, William A. Seiter [54]
A Girl Must Live Leslie James Carol Reed [54]
Rulers of the Sea Mary Shaw Frank Lloyd [54]
1940 The Stars Look Down Jenny Sunley Carol Reed [54]
Girl in the News Anne Graham Carol Reed [54]
Night Train to Munich Anna Bomasch Carol Reed [54]
1941 Quiet Wedding Janet Royd Anthony Asquith [54]
1942 Alibi Helene Ardouin Brian Desmond Hurst [54]
1943 The Man in Grey Hesther Shaw Leslie Arliss [54]
Dear Octopus Penny Randolph Harold French [54]
1944 Give Us the Moon Nina Val Guest [54]
Love Story Lissa Campbell Leslie Arliss A Lady Surrenders [54]
1945 A Place of One's Own Annette Bernard Knowles [54]
I'll Be Your Sweetheart Edie Story Val Guest [54]
The Wicked Lady Barbara Worth Leslie Arliss [54]
1946 Bedelia Bedelia Carrington Lance Comfort [54]
1947 Hungry Hill Fanny Rosa Brian Desmond Hurst [54]
Jassy Jassy Woodroofe Bernard Knowles [54]
The White Unicorn Lucy Bernard Knowles Bad Sister [54]
1948 Pygmalion Eliza Doolittle Television film
Look Before You Love Ann Markham Harold Huth [54]
1949 Cardboard Cavalier Nell Gwynne Walter Forde [54]
Madness of the Heart Lydia Garth Charles Bennett [54]
1950 Highly Dangerous Frances Gray Roy Ward Baker [54]
1952 Trent's Last Case Margaret Manderson Herbert Wilcox [54]
1953 Captain Brassbound's Conversion Lady Cicely Wayneflete Dennis Vance Television film [54]
Laughing Anne Laughing Anne Herbert Wilcox [54]
1954 Trouble in the Glen Marissa Mengues Herbert Wilcox [54]
1955 Spider's Web Clarissa Hailsham-Brown Wallace Douglas Television film
Cast a Dark Shadow Freda Jeffries Lewis Gilbert [54]
1956 Murder Mistaken Freda Jeffries Campbell Logan Television film [54]
Call It a Day Dorothy Hilton Hal Burton Television film
1976 The Slipper and the Rose Stepmother Bryan Forbes [54]
1983 The Man in Gray Hesther Shaw Leslie Arliss [55]

Unmade films Edit

  • adaptation of Rob Roy (1939) with Will Fyffe and Michael Redgrave[12]
  • adaptation of The Blue Lagoon (1939) with Richard Greene[56]
  • The Reluctant Widow – announced 1946 [57]
  • Mary Magdalene written by Clemence Dane – Lockwood said she was "really looking forward" to making the film in 1947. [58]
  • Trial for Murder (1940s) – proposed Hollywood film from Mark Robson[59]
  • Family Affairs by Gertrude Jennings (1934) [60]
  • Spider's Web
  • Subway in the Sky (March 1957) [61]
  • 1946 – Daily Mail National Film Awards Most Outstanding British actress during the war years
  • 1947 – Daily Mail National Film Awards Best Film Actress of the year
  • 1948 – Daily Mail National Film Awards Best Film Actress of the year in Jassy
  • 1955 – BAFTA nomination for Best British Actress in Cast a Dark Shadow
  • 1961 – Daily Mirror Television Award. [62]
  • 1971 – TV Times. Best Actress Award [62]
  • 1973 – The Sun. Best Actress Award [62]

Various polls of exhibitors consistently listed Lockwood among the most popular stars of her era:


John L. Lockwood SwStr - History

Thanks to Fairfield County Volunteer, Carl Myers, digital photographs of the headstones in this cemetery are available to be sent via email. Please send you requests to Barbara Kaye. Refer to the numbers preceding the names below when requesting photos of your ancestors' headstones. Thanks for all your hard work, Carl.

These records have been contributed by Fairfield County, CT researcher Barbara Kaye. The data has been collected from several sources, including the Hale Cemetery Collection (see history, below).
We need you! If you live near a cemetery in Fairfield County, CT and wish to contribute data or add additional information to an existing cemetery collection, please email Barbara Kaye. I will see to it that your information is added. If you are interested in volunteering to photograph other cemeteries, please let me know. The Charles R. Hale Collection of Headstone Inscriptions resides at the Connecticut State Library. Charles Hale was a member of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.In 1916, he became involved in locating and decorating the graves of Revolutionary and Civil War veterans in his home town of Rocky Hill. In order to make it easier to find these graves, he decided to record each veteran's name, date of death and military service. He was persuaded by State Librarian George S. Godard to search also for veterans of other wars.

In 1919, the General Assembly made an appropriation to carry on this work throughout the State. In 1933 and 1934, with grants from the F.E.R.A. and the W.P.A., Mr. Hale began copying and indexing the essential information from every headstone in the State. Two copies of these listings were deposited in the State Library. Records for individual towns were made available to libraries and historical societies throughout Connecticut.

Note:
These records may contain errors in dates or names. Some errors were made either at the time of the survey of the cemeteries or during the transcription in 1935. One common error in reading old headstones is mistaking a four for a one. We have tried very hard to avoid creating new errors during the retyping of this data for the internet. In addition, we have attempted to correct some of the original errors, either by revisiting these cemeteries or by recalculating dates or ages based on known dates of birth for some of these people. However, some of the stones that were legible in 1934 are either missing or no longer legible.

I have also attempted to identify these people, using census and other vital records. Anything added within brackets like these [ ] indicates a suggestion as to the identity of the person. If a wife's name does not include a separate surname, it is not known at this time. Many couples in early Stamford were second or third cousins with the same surname. There are many surnames that have several alternate spellings. (See spellings for a list of common surnames and their alternate spellings.) Some people appear in more than one listing because some graves were moved to newer cemeteries, new stones were carved, and the old stones were left behind. Although much of the data on the various families in early Stamford is accurate, there will always be errors, many of which are found in published genealogies. It is recommended that you write to the Town Clerk's office for death or birth certificates for your ancestors. If you have documentation that supplies any missing information or corrects an error, please email Barbara Kaye .

Oliver Lockwood--Lockwood #1--418-41
South of Barnes Rd. at its east end, in a clearing
Condition: fair
Copied by Earle F. Kepler & Phillip Palmer, November 13, 1934.


4325 Lockwood, Fitch, died Nov. 2, 1849, age 21 yrs. 8 mos. 11 days. [son of Oliver Lockwood & Polly Smith Mills]
4324 Lockwood, George J., died Aug. 20, 1860, age 29 yrs. 1 mo. 1 day. [son of Oliver Lockwood & Polly Smith Mills]
Lockwood, Oliver, died Apr. 19, 1864, age 71 yrs. 7 mos. 29 days. [son of Stephen Lockwood & Elizabeth ?]
4322 Husted, Emma Fitch, daughter of Charles H. & Cordelia L., born Aug. 12, 1849, died Sept. 3, 1876.
4322 Lockwood, Polly M., [wife of Oliver Lockwood] born July 30, 1795, died Oct. 10, 1874.
[Polly Smith Mills, daughter of Nathaniel Mills & Hannah Smith and grandmother of Emma Fitch Husted]
Lockwood, Cordelia, [wife of Charles Henry Husted and John L.C. Hoyt] born June 24, 1826, died Apr. 9, 1905.
[daughter of Oliver Lockwood and Polly S. Mills]
4326 Husted, Charles H.[Henry], died Nov. 13, 1849, age 25 yrs. 1 mo. 6 days.
Lockwood, Van Buren, born Oct. 17, 1829, died Jan. 29, 1905. [son of Oliver Lockwood & Polly Smith Mills]

Bailey, Pruey Ann, wife of John S., died Nov. 28, 1844, age 48 yrs. 7 mos. 8 days.
Lockwood, Thaddeus, died Dec. 9, 1851, age 85 yrs.
Lockwood, Luther, died Oct. 29, 1827, age 37 yrs. 10 mos. 3 days.

Crabb, Eli, died Jan. 31, 1858.
Caprizzi, Pasquale, died Dec. 22, 1900, age 31 yrs.
Wendle, William H., died Sept. 9, 1900, age 51 yrs.
Stromberg, Frederika, died May 14, 1900, age 75 yrs.
Buxton, Charles, died Sept. 12, 1899, age 60 yrs.
Ewell, Perer, died Aug. 13, 1899, age 75 yrs.
Milton, William, died May 10, 1899, age 57 yrs.
Ross, Margaret, died Apr. 9, 1899, age 55 yrs.
Seaman, Elizabeth, died Dec. 17, 1897, age 55 yrs.
Dietz, Theodore, died Sept. 15, 1896, age 64 yrs.
Baker, Ellen, died Sept. 7, 1896, age 43 yrs.
Connell, Martin, died Apr. 19, 1896 age 48 yrs.
Carr, James, died Mar. 26, 1896, age 46 yrs.
Jarvis, David, died Jan. 20, 1895, age 68 yrs.
Scofield, Abigail, wife of Ebenezer, died Jan. 27, 1893, age 83 yrs. 7 mos. [Abigail Crabbe, daughter of Richard Crabbe and Deborah Pelham]
Scofield, Ebenezer, died Sept. 30, 1875, age 70 yrs. mos. 13 days. [son of Ezra Scofield and Ann Crissey]
Crabbe, Eli, born May 29, 1802, died Mar. 31, 1858.
Crabbe, Charlotte Scofield, wife of Eli, born Feb. 5, 1807, died Oct. 24, 1868. [Charlotte Scofield, daughter of Ezra Scofield and Ann Crissey]
Crabbe, Ebenezer, Company B. 17th Connecticut Volunteers, Civil War, died Nov. 11, 1878.
Norton, Robert, born Sept. 18, 1863, died July 3, 1932.
Tilton, Arthur - no dates
Mosher, James J., born Aug. 12, 1837, died Feb. 5, 1911.
Mosher, Amanda L. Scofield, wife of James J., born May 10, 1842, died Jan. 8, 1918. [Amanda L. Scofield, daughter of Amos Scofield and Marrilla Burgess]
Mosher, Frannie, son of James & Amanda, died Aug. 16, 1864, age 5 mos.
Palmer, Helen J., wife of Ralph, died Feb. 18, 1902. [age 38 in 1880 mother of Wesley Turner]
Palmer, Ralph, born Aug. 12, 1818, died Jan. 20, 1897. [son of Elias Palmer & Sally ?]
Palmer, Sally, wife of Elias, died Feb. 22, 1876, age 89 yrs. 4 mos.
Palmer, Elias, died July 26, 1867, age 87 yrs. 7 days.
Wardwell, Christopher, died Nov. 13, 1893, age 60 yrs.
Palmer, Nancy, died Dec. 7, 1899, age 77 yrs. 7 mos. 22 days. [daughter of Elias Palmer & Sally ?]
Bates, Orrion, died Apr. 13, 1919, age 79 yrs.
Palmer, Henry E., died June 16, 1908, age 82 yrs. 5 mos. 20 days.
Scofield, Sylvester N.[Newman], born 1831, died 1924. [son of John L. Scofield and Emeline Bishop]
Scofield, Rachel Bates, wife of Sylvester, born 1832, died 1912.
Scofield, Edward F., son of John L. & Emeline, born 1852, died 1916.
Scofield, Charles, son of Sylvester & Rachel, born 1853, died 1910. [Charles Alfred Scofield]
Scofield, Emeline, wife of John L., died May 18, 1876, age 64 yrs. 11 mos. [Emeline Bishop, daughter of Rufus Bishop and Annie Lockwood]
Scofield, John L., died May 3, 1867, age 63 yrs. 3 mos. [John Lockwood Scofield, son of Ezra Scofield and Ann Crissey]
Merritt, Abijah, born Mar. 12, 1847, died Dec. 10, 1910.
Merritt, Celia L. Palmer, wife of Abijah, born Oct. 17, 1851, died Dec. 2, 1910. [daughter of Ira Palmer & Louisa A. Miller]
Palmer, Ira, born Jan. 4, 1812, died Oct. 4, 1897.
Palmer, Louisa A., wife of Ira, born Nov. 29, 1820, died Apr. 5, 1880. [Louisa A. Miller, daughter of David Miller & Anna ?]
Palmer, Harriet, born 1917, died 1926.
Palmer, Maggie, wife of Harry, born Jan. 27, 1842, died Sept. 11, 1906.
Badger, Mary J., born Feb. 22, 1824, died Dec. 28, 1892.
Lockwood, Hanford, died Aug. 20, 1887, age 77 yrs. [son of Lewis Lockwood & Sally Lockwood]
Lockwood, Henry L., son of Hanford, died Jan 3, 1872, age 19 yrs.
Crabb, Richard, died July 23, 1867, age 51 yrs. 11 mos. [not married to Deborah Pelham]
Crabb, Ruth, wife of Jeremiah, died Aug. 2, 1856, age 52 yrs. 7 mos.
Crabb, Jeremiah, died May 24, 1854, age 63 yrs. 3 mos.
Crabb, Deborah, wife of Richard, died Sept. 25, 1839, age 57 yrs. 3 mos. [Deborah Pelham]
Dariah, Charles, died Aug. 27, 1859, age 53 yrs. 10 mos.
Scofield, Deborah Ann, daughter of Ebenezer & Abigail [Crabbe], died Sept. 30, 1836, age 2 yrs.
Scofield, Samuel C., died July 22, 1825, age 28 yrs. [Samuel Crissey Scofield, son of Ezra Scofield & Ann Crissey]
Scofield, Harvey W., died July 18, 1827, age 17 yrs. 11 mos.
Waterbury, Thankful, wife of Isaac, died May 27, 1808, age 76 yrs. 3 mos. [daughter of Nathaniel Scofield & Elizabeth Pettit]
Scofield, Emily Susan, daughter of Amos & Mary, died June 22, 1832, age 3 yrs. 12 days.
Scofield, Mercy, wife of Phineas, died Dec. 8, 1832, age 48 yrs. 3 mos. [Mercy Seely, daughter of Abijah Seely & Lydia Hoyt]
Scofield, Phineas, died Mar. 10, 1820, age 47 yrs. [son of Abraham Scofield & Sarah Lockwood]
Scofield, Mercy, wife of Phineas, died Feb. 24, 1809, age 35 yrs. [Mercy Finch, daughter of Nathaniel Finch & Mehitable Hoyt]
Hesselaer, Henerikus, died June 7, 1889, age 79 yrs.
Stone, Clarissa A., born Dec. 1, 1821, died Jan. 23, 1896.
Hayden, Joseph F., born Dec. 8, 1856, died Jan. 5, 1915.
Miller, Harry E., son of James J. & Anna E., born Oct. 3, 1883, died Feb. 12, 1884.
Miller, Maud C., daughter of James & & Anna E., born Dec. 20, 1884, died Feb. 21, 1893.
Ayres, Bradley, died Apr. 28, 1825, age 73 yrs. [son of Ebenezer Ayres & Elizabeth Holly]
Waring, Jared, died Nov. 21, 1821, age 45 yrs. [son of John Waring & Mary Ayres]
Buxton, Patty, wife of Samuel, died Nov. 9, 1807, age 33 yrs. [Abigail Davenport, daughter of Hezekiah Davenport & Ruth Ketchum]
Lockwood, Polly, died Jan. 31, 1861, age 76 yrs. 1 mo. 17 days. [daughter of Reuben Lockwood & Mary Mead]
Lockwood, Matilda, died Jan. 14, 1894, age 80 yrs. [daughter of Joseph Lockwood & Sarah Slauson]
Lockwood, Lewis, died June 18, 1830, age 47 yrs. 7 mos. [son of Reuben Lockwood & Mary Mead]
Lockwood, Louisa J., daughter of Lewis & Nancy, died Jan. 20, 1830, age 6 yrs. 2 mos.
Lockwood, Sarah, wife of Lewis, died Mar. 20, 1822, age 17 yrs. [Sarah Lockwood]
Scofield, Marilla A. H., wife of Amos, died May 6, 1887, age 71 yrs. 8 mos. [Marilla Burgess]
Scofield, Amos, died Mar. 7, 1867, age 64 yrs. 8 mos. 3 days. [son of Jared Scofield & Dorcas Weed]
Scofield, Mary, wife of Amos, died June 10, 1836, age 31 yrs. 2 mos. [daughter of Phineas Scofield & Mercy Finch]

Finch, Louisa J., [2nd] wife of James, died Sept. 17, 1888, age 66 yrs. 3 mos. [daughter of Isaac Knapp & Thirza Lockwood]
Finch, Emma Louisa, daughter of James & Louisa J., died Nov. 23, 1869, age 14 yrs. 3 mos. 26 days.
Finch, Agnes, daughter of James & Louisa J., died Apr. 19, 1858, age 7 mos. 22 days.
Buxton, Sally Ann, wife of Nelson, born Feb. 21, 1820, died Sept. 13, 1892. [Sally Ann Scofield, daughter of Alvah Scofield & Polly Wilmot]
Buxton, Albert L., died Dec. 19, 1880, age 37 yrs., 2 mos. 24 days. [son of Nelson Buxton & Sally Ann Scofield]
Buxton, Sarah L., wife of Albert L., died July 21, 1866, age 23 yrs. 3 mos. 4 days.
Lockwood, Shadrach, died Nov. 13, 1844, age 70 yrs. [son of John Lockwood & Hannah Hoyt] [1841 in error]
Lockwood, Phebe, wife of Shadrach, died Jan. 11, 1857, age 69 yrs. [daughter of Samuel Weed & Phebe Smith]
Lockwood, John W., born July 6, 1816, died Dec. 25, 1907. [son of Shadrach Lockwood & Phebe Weed]
Lockwood, Huldah J., wife of John W., born Oct. 28, 1820, died Dec. 17, 1898. [Huldah J. Scofield, possibly daughter of Hezron Scofield & Phebe Holly]
Lockwood, Harvey, died Apr. 14, 1868, age 70 yrs. 10 mos. [son of Josiah Lockwood & Olive Searles]
Lockwood, Sally, wife of Harvey, died Jan. 31, 1863, age 60 yrs. 9 mos. 3 days. [Sally Scofield]
Lockwood, Uri Morris, son of Harvey & Sally, died Feb. 4, 1857, age 18 yrs. 4 mos. 19 days.
Knapp, Isaac, died Feb. 20, 1835, age 41 yrs. 9 mos. 24 days. [son of Jacob Knapp & Mary Smith]
Lockwood, Mary, daughter of Shadrach & Phebe, died Sept. 15, 1825, age 18 yrs.
Knapp, Thirza, wife of Isaac, died Jan. 22, 1864, age 68 yrs. 4 days. [Thirza Lockwood, daughter of Josiah Lockwood & Olive Searles]
Buxton, Henry W., son of Nelson L. & Sally A., died July 15, 1868, age 22 yrs. 7 mos. 10 days.
Finch, Sarah A., [1st] wife of James, and daughter of Harvey & Sally Lockwood, died Aug. 4, 1845, age 21 yrs. 4 mos. 26 days.
Reynolds, Abram H., died Mar. 14, 1863, age 23 yrs. 3 mos. 3 days. [son of Henry E. & Phebe Scofield]
Pender, Phebe, born Feb. 27, 1820, died Oct. 21, 1883. [possibly Phebe H. Scofield
Reynolds, Henry E., died Nov. 23, 1862, age 52 yrs. 7 mos. 24 days.
Reynolds, Adeline, daughter of Henry E. & Phebe [Phebe H. Scofield], died Nov. 17, 1860, age 23 yrs. 5 mos. 12 days.
Reynolds, Ellen G., daughter of Henry E. & Phebe [Phebe H. Scofield], died Aug 26, 1857, age 16 yrs. 10 mos. 3 days.
Scofield, Hannah, wife of John H. [Jonathan Holly Scofield], died May 23, 1847, age 82 yrs. [Hannah Lockwood, daughter of John Lockwood, Jr.. & Hannah Hoyt]
Scofield, Lucretia, died Apr. 8, 1862, age 65 yrs. 11 mos. 17 days. [daughter of Jonathan Holly Scofield and wife Hannah Lockwood]


Quotes

John (to Damon): "So what do you think, Damon? You know this vampire problem is real, right? It's a potential bloodbath. Oh, I think it's like 1864 all over again. Vampires running amok. Guess we're gonna have to hunt them down, throw them in church burn them to ash." John (to Damon): "You see, it seems there was a tomb under the church - where the vampires were hidden away waiting for someone to set them free. But then you already knew that, didn't you? Being that you're the one that did it." John (to the Founding families): "One hundred and fifty years of community, prosperity, family. We take care of each other. We look after each other. We protect each other. It's good to be home." John (to Damon): "My knowledge of this town goes beyond anything that you or the council knows. So if you were planning on some clever high-speed-snatch-ring-vamp-kill move - know that if I die, everything I know goes to the council. Including a fascinating little tale of the original Salvatore brothers and their present-day return to Mystic Falls." -- Under Control John (to Jeremy): "You can fight it if you want, but it's part of being a Gilbert." John (to Jenna): "Her mother's name is Pearl? I believe I already know all about her." -- Miss Mystic Falls John (to Pearl): "That's why I wanted to meet with you. I'm planning on changing you mind. With my Gilbert charm. I know you have a weakness for it. May I buy you a drink?" John (to Pearl): "I can help you. I'm connected around here. Town council's eating out my hand. They do whatever I say. I know you just wanna live your life with a picket fence, I can help you." John (to Pearl): "I read his journals. They're very extensive. He actually wrote about you. You were his one regret. He loved you and he hated himself for what he did to you. On his last days, he wrote how sorry he was. You were the only women he only loved. (Laughing) Good god. You vampires you're so emotional. Johnathan Gilbert hated you. His only regret was he didn't drive a stake through your heart himself." -- Blood Brothers John (to Isobel): "They're people, and you're treating them like they're dolls. We're in a partnership because we share a mutual goal. Don't ever confuse that for an acceptance of your lifestyle." John (to Jeremy): "Know that you can talk to me about anything. I'm here to answer any questions that you have. To help you in any way I can. Because your dad would want me to." John (to Isobel): "Come on. Come on, Isobel. I know you. Okay? It's me, John. You can't hurt a kid. Look, I know you're changed, okay? But the old Isobel is there somewhere still. Isn't she?" John (to Jeremy): "Your ancestor invented a weapon, A device that's extremely harmful to vampires. We've been trying to get it. Because there's a group of vampires from a long time ago that wants revenge on this town. Look Jeremy. no one ever thought vampires would return to this town. Not in modern times. But they have. And we have to destroy them." -- Isobel John (to Mayor Lockwood): "This is the key. Once inserted, the device will be activated. It will work only once for an estimated time of five minutes. It's a high-pitched frequency that humans can't hear. Any vampire within a five-block radius will be incapacitated, exposing them. At that time, the sheriff's deputies will inject them with vervain and bring them here, where we'll finish them off." John (to Elena): "Because I'm doing what should've been done 145 years ago? This is the right thing, Elena." John: (To Elena) "You know, I first met Isobel when I was a teenager. I fell in love with her instantly, although I'm pretty sure she never loved me. She was special. Part of why I hate the vampires so much is because of what she became. How it ruined her. And I never would've sent her to Damon had I known she wanted to turn. It's my fault. I'm telling you this because I hope. maybe you'd understand." -- Founder's Day

John (to Jeremy): "Not all, but enough. For now. Can you tell Elena I said goodbye?" John (to Jeremy): " You know Jeremy, I was taught to hate them, the vampires. That's what I know that's what your father knew." John (to Jeremy): "No, he may have done things differently but there's no other way to see it." John (to Jeremy): "What happened to your parents wasn't supernatural, it was an accident. There's nothing that can save us from that." John (to Jeremy): "He would think that you're still young. You're still finding yourself but you are a Gilbert and you've been exposed to this town's darkest secret and with that comes responsibility." -- The Return John (to Elena): "Not exactly. Hello Elena." -- The Descent John (to Elena): "I'm here to protect you. That's all I can say for the moment." John (to Jenna): "I'm Elena's biological father. There, now you know." John (to Jeremy): "You didn't miss much. Let's say that no one's happy to see me would be an understatement." John (to Damon): "I've been alright, Damon. It's good to see you." John (to Damon): " Is that any way to convince me that you and I are on the same side? First, I need to know that I can trust you, Damon, that I can count on you. Then we'll talk." Damon (to John): "First dad duty: ground your daughter. Keep her here." John (to Damon): "No, no, no, no, no. I'm with Damon on this one. No, stop, stop. You're not going anywhere. Just tell me what's going on." John (to Elena): "Yes I can. You want to know why? Because I'm here to make sure you stay safe" John (to Damon): "I've been thinking. Personal feelings aside Damon, I think you and Stefan will do all you can to protect Elena." John (to Elena): "Miranda and Grayson were your parents, Elena, and I know I'm nothing to you. You have no reason to believe me or trust me. I've done so many horrible things, but when you lost your parents, I lost my brother, my family. I lost my way. I know that I probably won't ever make things right with you, but I'm gonna do everything I can to protect you and protect this family." -- Daddy Issues John (to Elena via letter): "Elena. it's no easy task being an ordinary parent to an extraordinary child. I failed in that task. And because of my prejudices, I failed you. I'm haunted by how things might have played out differently. If I'd been more willing to hear your side of things. "For me, it's the end. For you, a chance to grow old and someday do better with your own child than I did with mine. It's for that child that I give you my ring. I don't ask for your forgiveness or for you to forget. I ask only that you believe this. Whether you are now reading this as a human or as a vampire, I love you all the same as I've always loved you, and always will. John. -- The Sun Also Rises


The Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg

First Brigade ("Iron Brigade")- Brig. Gen. Solomon Meredith (w) Col. William W. Robinson.
19th Indiana Infantry- Col. Samuel J. Williams
24th Michigan Infantry- Col. Henry A. Morrow (w), Capt. Albert M. Edwards
2nd Wisconsin Infantry- Col. Lucius Fairchild (w), Maj. John Mansfield (w), Capt. George H. Otis
6th Wisconsin Infantry- Lt. Col. Rufus R. Dawes
7th Wisconsin Infantry- Col. William W. Robinson, Maj. Mark Finnicum

Second Brigade -Brig. Gen. Lysander Cutler
7th Indiana Infantry- Col. Ira G. Grover
76th New York Infantry- Maj. Andrew J. Grover (k), Capt. John E. Cook
84th New York Infantry (14th Militia)- Col. Edward B. Fowler
95th New York Infantry- Col. George H. Biddle(w), Maj. Edward Pye
147th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Francis C. Miller (w), Maj. George Harney
56th Pennsylvania Infantry (9 cos.)- Col. J. William Hoffman

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. John C. Robinson

First Brigade- Brig. General Gabriel R. Paul (w), Col. Samuel H. Leonard (w), Col. Adrian R. Root (w), Col. Richard Coulter (w), Col. Peter Lyle
16th Maine Infantry- Col. Charles W. Tilden, Maj. Archibald D Leavitt
13th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Samuel H. Leonard, Lt. Col. N. Walter Batchelder
94th New York Infantry- Col. Adrian R. Root, Maj. Samuel A. Moffett
104th New York Infantry- Col. Gilbert G. Prey
107th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. James M. MacThomson (w), Capt. Emanuel D. Roath

Second Brigade- Brig. Gen. Henry Baxter
12th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. James L. Bates (w), Lt. Col. David Allen, Jr.
83rd New York Infantry (9th Militia)- Lt. Col. Joseph A. Moesch
97th New York Infantry- Col. Charles Wheelock (w/c), Maj. Charles Northrup
11th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Richard Coulter, Capt. Benjamin F. Haines (w), Capt. John B. Overmyer
88th Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. Benezet F. Foust (w), Capt. Edmund A. Mass (c), Capt. Henry Whiteside
90th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Peter Lyle, Maj. Alfred J. Sellers (MOH)

THIRD DIVISION- Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday, Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Rowley

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Rowley, Col. Chapman Biddle
80th New York Infantry (20th Militia)- Col. Theodore B. Gates
121st Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Chapman Biddle, Maj. Alexander Biddle
142nd Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Robert P. Cummins (mw), Lt. Col. A. B. McCalmont
151st Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. George F. McFarland (w), Capt. Walter F. Owens, Col. Harrison Allen

Second Brigade ("Bucktail Brigade")- Col. Roy Stone (w), Col. Langhorne Wister (w), Col. Edmund L. Dana
143rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Edmund L. Dana, Lt. Col. John D. Musser
149th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Walton Dwight (w), Capt. James Glenn
150th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Langhorne Wister (w), Lt. Col. Henry S. Huidekoper (w), Capt. Cornelius C. Widdis

Third Brigade (Second Vermont Brigade)- Brig. Gen. George J. Stannard (w), Col. Francis V. Randall
12th Vermont Infantry- Col. Asa Blunt
13th Vermont Infantry- Col. Francis V. Randall, Maj. Joseph J. Boynton, Lt. Col. William D. Munson (w)
14th Vermont Infantry- Col. William T. Nichols
15th Vermont Infantry- Col. Redfield Proctor
16th Vermont Infantry- Col. Wheelock G. Veazey (MOH)

Artillery Brigade-
Col. Charles S. Wainwright
2nd Battery (B), Maine Light Artillery- Capt. James A. Hall
5th Battery (E), Maine Light Artillery- Capt. Greenleaf T. Stevens (w), Lt. Edward N. Whittier
Batteries B and L, 1st New York Light Artillery- Capt. Gilbert H. Reynolds (w), Lt. George Breck
Battery B, 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery- Capt. James H. Cooper
Battery B, 4th United States Artillery, Battery B- Lt. James Stewart

SECOND ARMY CORPS
Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock (w), Brig. Gen. John Gibbon (w)
Escort: Co's D and K, 6 th New York Cavalry- Capt. Riley Johnson

FIRST DIVISION- Brig. Gen. John C. Caldwell

First Brigade- Col. Edward E. Cross (mw), Col. H. Boyd McKeen
5th New Hampshire Infantry- Lt. Col. Charles E. Hapgood
61st New York Infantry- Col. K. Oscar Broady
81st Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Amos Stroh
148th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. H. Boyd McKeen, Lt. Col. Robert McFarlane

Second Brigade ("Irish Brigade")- Col. Patrick Kelly
28th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Richard Byrnes
63rd New York Infantry (2 cos.)- Lt. Col. Richard C. Bentley (w), Capt. Thomas Touhy
69th New York Infantry (2 cos.)- Capt. Richard Moroney (w), Lt. James J. Smith
88th New York Infantry (2 cos.)- Capt. Denis F. Burke
116th Pennsylvania Infantry (4 cos.)- Maj. St. Clair A. Mulholland

Third Brigade- Brig. General Samuel K. Zook (mw), Lieut. Col. John Fraser
52nd New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Charles G. Freudenberg (w), Maj. Edward Venuit (k), Capt. William Scherrer
57th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Alford B. Chapman
66th New York Infantry- Col. Orlando H. Morris (w), Lt. Col. John S. Hammell (w), Maj. Peter Nelson
140th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Richard P. Roberts (k), Lt. Col. John Fraser

Fourth Brigade- Col. John R. Brooke (w)
27th Connecticut Infantry (2 cos.)- Lt. Col. Henry C. Merwin (k) , Maj. James H. Coburn
2nd Delaware Infantry- Col. William P. Bailey, Capt. Charles H. Christman
64th New York Infantry- Col. Daniel G. Bingham (w), Maj. Leman W. Bradley
53rd Pennsylvania Infantry - Lt. Col. Richard McMichael
145th Pennsylvania Infantry (7 cos.)- Col. Hiram L. Brown (w), Capt. John W. Reynolds (w), Capt. Moses W. Oliver

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. John Gibbon (w), Brig. Gen. William Harrow

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. William Harrow, Col. Francis E. Heath
19th Maine Infantry- Col. Francis E. Heath (w), Lt. Col. Henry W. Cunningham
15th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. George H. Ward (mw), Lt. Col. George C. Joslin
1st Minnesota Infantry- Col. William C. Colvill, Jr., Capt. Nathan S. Messick (k), Capt. Henry C. Coates
82nd New York Infantry (2nd Militia)- Lt. Col. James Huston (k), Capt. John Darrow

Second Brigade ("Philadelphia Brigade")- Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb
69th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Dennis O'Kane (mw), Capt. William Davis
71st Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Richard Penn Smith
72nd Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. De Witt C. Baxter (s), Lt. Col. Theodore Hesser
106th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. William L. Curry

Third Brigade- Col. Norman J. Hall
59 th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Max A. Thoman (mw), Capt. William McFadden
19th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Arthur F. Devereaux
20th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Paul J. Revere (mw), Lt. Col. George N. Macy (w), Capt. Henry L. Abbott
7th Michigan Infantry- Lt. Col. Amos E. Steele, Jr. (k), Maj. Sylvanus W. Curtis
42nd New York Infantry- Col. James E. Mallon

Unattached: 1 st Company, Massachusetts Sharpshooters- Capt. William Plummer, Lt. Emerson L. Bicknell

THIRD DIVISION- Brig. General Alexander Hays

First Brigade- Col. Samuel S. Carroll
14th Indiana Infantry- Col. John Coons
4th Ohio Infantry- Lt. Col. Leonard W. Carpenter
8th Ohio Infantry-Lt. Col. Franklin Sawyer
7th West Virginia Infantry- Lt. Col. Jonathan H. Lockwood

Second Brigade- Col. Thomas A. Smyth (w), Lt. Col. Francis E. Pierce
14th Connecticut Infantry - Maj. Theodore G. Ellis
1st Delaware Infantry- Lt. Col. Edward P. Harris, Capt. Thomas B. Hizar (w), Lieut. William Smith (k), Lt. John D. Dent
12th New Jersey Infantry- Maj. John T. Hill
10th New York Battalion- Maj. George F. Hopper
108th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Francis E. Pierce

Third Brigade- Col. George L. Willard (k), Col. Eliakim Sherrill (mw), Lieut. Col. James L. Bull
39th New York Infantry (4 cos.)- Maj. Hugo Hildebrandt
111th New York Infantry- Col. Clinton D. MacDougall (w), Lt. Col. Isaac M. Lusk (w), Capt. Aaron B. Seeley
125th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Levin Crandall
126th New York Infantry- Col. Eliakim Sherrill, Lt. Col. James L. Bull

Artillery Brigade- Capt. John G. Hazard
Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery and 14th New York Battery- Capt. James K. Rorty (k), Lt. Albert S. Sheldon (w), Lt. Robert E. Rogers
Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Artillery- Capt. William A. Arnold
Battery B, 1st Rhode Island Artillery- Lt. T. Fred Brown
Battery I, 1st United States Artillery- Lt. George A. Woodruff (mw), Lieut. Tully McCrea
Battery A, 4th United States Artillery- Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing (k), Sgt. Frederick Fuger

THIRD ARMY CORPS
Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles (w), Maj. Gen. David B. Birney (w)

FIRST DIVISION- Maj. Gen. David B. Birney, Brig. Gen. J. H. Hobart Ward

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Charles K. Graham (m,c), Col. Andrew H. Tippin
57th Pennsylvania Infantry (8 cos.)- Col. Peter Sides (w), Capt. Alanson H. Nelson
63rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. John A. Danks
68th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Andrew H. Tippin, Capt. Milton S. Davis
105th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Calvin A. Craig
114th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Frederick F. Cavada (w), Capt. Edward R. Bowen
141st Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Henry J. Madill

Second Brigade-Brig. Gen. J. H. Hobart Ward, Col. Hiram Berdan
20th Indiana Infantry- Col. John Wheeler (mw) , Lt. Col. William C. L. Taylor
3rd MaineInfantry - Col. Moses B. Lakeman
4th Maine (Col. Elijah Walker (), Capt. Edward Libby
86th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Benjamin L. Higgins
124th New York Infantry- Col. Van Horne Ellis (k), Lt. Col. Francis L. Cummins
99th Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. John W. Moore
1st United States Sharpshooters- Col. Hiram Berdan, Lt. Col. Casper Trepp
2nd United States Sharpshooters (8 cos.)- Maj. Homer R. Stoughton

Third Brigade- Col. P. Regis De Trobriand
17th Maine Infantry -Lt. Col. Charles B. Merrill
3rd Michigan Infantry- Col. Byron R. Pierce(w) Lt. Col. Edward S. Pierce
5th Michigan Infantry- Lt. Col. John Pulford (w)
40th New York Infantry- Col. Thomas W. Egan (w)
110th Pennsylvania (6 cos.)- Lt. Col. David M. Jones (w), Maj. Isaac Rogers

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Andrew A. Humphreys

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Joseph B. Carr
1st Massachusetts Infantry- Lt. Col. Clark B. Baldwin
11th Massachusetts Infantry- Lt. Col. Porter D. Tripp
16th Massachusetts Infantry- Lt. Col. Waldo Merriam (w), Capt. Matthew Donovan
12th New Hampshire Infantry- Capt. John F. Langley
11th New Jersey Infantry- Col. Robert McAllister (w), Capt. Luther Martin (k), Capt. William H. Lloyd (w), Capt. Samuel T. Sleeper, Lt. John Schoonover (w)
26th Pennsylvania Infantry-Maj. Robert L. Bodine
84th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Milton Opp (Train guard, not present at Gettysburg)

Second Brigade- Col. William R. Brewster
70th New York Infantry- Col. J. Egbert Farnum
71st New York Infantry- Col. Henry L. Potter (w)
72nd New York Infantry- Col. John S. Austin (w), Lt. Col. John Leonard
73rd New York Infantry- Maj. Michael W. Burns
74th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Thomas Holt
120th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Cornelius D. Westbrook (w), Maj. John R. Tappen

Third Brigade- Col. George C. Burling
2nd New Hampshire Infantry- Col. Edward L. Bailey (w)
5th New Jersey Infantry- Col. William J. Sewell (w), Capt. Thomas C. Godfrey, Capt. Henry H. Woolsey (w)
6th New Jersey Infantry- Lt. Col. Stephen R. Gilkyson
7th New Jersey Infantry- Col. Louis R. Francine (mw), Maj. Fred Cooper
8th New Jersey Infantry- Col. John Ramsey (w), Capt. John G. Langston
115th Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. John P. Dunne

Artillery Brigade- Capt. George E. Randolph (w), Capt. A. Judson Clark
2nd Battery B, 1st New Jersey Light Artillery- Capt. A. Judson Clark, Lt. Robert Sims
Battery D, 1st New York Light Artillery- Capt. George B. Winslow
4th New York Independent Battery- Capt. James E. Smith
Battery E, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery- Lt. John K. Bucklyn (w), Lt. Benjamin Freeborn (w)
Battery K, 4th United States Artillery- Lt. Francis W. Seeley (w), Lt. Robert James

FIFTH ARMY CORPS
Maj. Gen. George Sykes

FIRST DIVISION- Brig. Gen. James Barnes, Brig. Gen. Charles Griffin

First Brigade- Col. Williams S. Tilton
18th Massachusetts Infantry -Col. Joseph Hayes
22nd MassachusettsInfantry- Lt. Col. Thomas Sherwin, Jr.
1st Michigan Infantry- Col. Ira C. Abbott (w), Lt. Col. William A. Throop
118th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. James Gwyn

Second Brigade- Col. Jacob B. Sweitzer
9th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Patrick R. Guiney
32nd Massachusetts Infantry- Col. George L. Prescott
4th Michigan Infantry- Col. Harrison H. Jeffords (mw), Lt. Col. George W. Lumbard
62nd Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. James C. Hull

Third Brigade- Col. Strong Vincent (mw), Col. James C. Rice
20th Maine Infantry- Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain
16th Michigan Infantry- Lt. Col. Norval E. Welch
44th New York Infantry- Col. James C. Rice, Lt. Col. Freeman Conner
83rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Capt. Orpeus S. Woodward

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Romeyn B. Ayres

First Brigade- Col. Hannibal Day
3rd United States Infantry (6 cos.)- Capt. Henry W. Freedley (w) , Capt. Richard G. Lay
4th United States Infantry (4 cos.)- Capt. Julius W. Adams, Jr.
6th United States Infantry (5 cos.)- Capt. Levi C. Bootes
12th United States Infantry (8 cos.)- Capt. Thomas S. Dunn
14th United States Infantry (8 cos.)- Maj. Grotius R. Giddings

Second Brigade- Col. Sidney Burbank
2nd United States Infantry (6 cos.)- Maj. Arthur T. Lee (w), Capt. Samuel A. McKee
7th United States Infantry (4 cos.)- Capt. David P. Hancock
10th United States Infantry (3 cos.)- Capt. William Clinton
11th United States Infantry (6 cos.)- Maj. DeLancey Floyd-Jones
17th United States Infantry (7 cos.)- Lt. Col. J. Durell Greene

Third Brigade- Brig. Gen. Stephen H. Weed (mw), Col. Kenner Garrard
140th New York Infantry- Col. Patrick O'Rorke(k), Lt. Col. Louis Ernst
146th New York Infantry- Col. Kenner Garrard, Lt. Col. David T. Jenkins
91st Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Joseph H. Sinex
155th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. John H. Cain

THIRD DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford

First Brigade- Col. William McCandless
1st Pennsylvania Reserves (9 cos.)- Col. William C. Talley
2nd Pennsylvania Reserves- Lt. Col. George A. Woodward
6th Pennsylvania Reserves- Lt. Col. Wellington H. Ent
13th Pennsylvania Reserves- Col. Charles F. Taylor (k), Maj. William R. Hartshorne

Third Brigade- Col. Joseph W. Fisher
5th Pennsylvania Reserves- Lt. Col. George Dare
9th Pennsylvania Reserves- Lt. James McK. Snodgrass
10th Pennsylvania Reserves- Col. Adoniram J. Warner
11th Pennsylvania Reserves- Col. Samuel M. Jackson
12th Pennsylvania Reserves (9 cos.)- Col. Martin D. Hardin

Artillery Brigade- Capt. Augustus P. Martin
Battery C, 3rd Massachusetts Light Artillery- Lt. Aaron F. Walcott
Battery C, 1st New York Light Artillery- Capt. Almont Barnes
Battery L, 1st Ohio Light Artillery- Capt. Frank C. Gibbs
Battery D, 5th United States Artillery- Lt. Charles E. Hazlett (k), Lieut. Benjamin F. Rittenhouse
Battery I, 5th United States Artillery- Lt. Malbone F. Watson (w), Lt. Charles C. MacConnell

SIXTH ARMY CORPS
Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick

FIRST DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Horatio G. Wright

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Alfred T. A. Torbert
1st New Jersey Infantry- Lt. Col. William Henry, Jr.
2nd New Jersey Infantry- Lt. Col. Charles Wiebecke
4th New Jersey Infantry (7 cos.)- Maj. Charles Ewing (Train guard, not present at Gettysburg)
3rd New Jersey Infantry- Col. Henry W. Brown
15th New Jersey Infantry- Col. William H. Penrose

Second Brigade- Brig. Gen. Joseph J. Bartlett
5th Maine Infantry- Col. Clark S. Edwards
121st New York Infantry- Col. Emory Upton
95th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Edward Carroll
96th Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. William H. Lessig

Third Brigade- Brig. Gen. David A. Russell
6th Maine Infantry- Col. Hiram Burnham
49th Pennsylvania Infantry (4 cos.) - Lt. Col. Thomas L. Hulings
119th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Peter S. Ellmaker
5th Wisconsin Infantry- Col. Thomas S. Allen

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Albion P. Howe

Second Brigade (First Vermont Brigade)- Col. Lewis A. Grant
2nd Vermont Infantry- Col. James H. Walbridge
3rd Vermont Infantry- Col. Thomas O. Seaver
4th Vermont Infantry- Col. Charles B. Stoughton
5th Vermont Infantry- Lt. Col. John R. Lewis
6th Vermont Infantry- Col. Elisha L. Barney

Third Brigade- Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Neill
7th Maine Infantry (6 cos.)- Lt. Col. Selden Connor
33rd New York Infantry (detach.) - Capt. Henry J. Gifford
43rd New York Infantry- Lt. Col. John Wilson
49th New York Infantry- Col. Daniel D. Bidwell
77th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Winsor B. French
61st Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. George F. Smith

THIRD DIVISION- Maj. Gen. John Newton, Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Alexander Shaler
65th New York Infantry- Col. Joseph E. Hamblin
67th New York Infantry- Col. Nelson Cross
122nd New York Infantry- Col. Silas Titus
23rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. John F. Glenn
82nd Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Isaac C. Bassett

Second Brigade- Col. Henry L. Eustis
7th Massachusetts Infantry- Lt. Col. Franklin P. Harrow
10th Massachusetts Infantry- Lt. Col. Joseph B. Parsons
37th Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Oliver Edwards
2nd Rhode Island Infantry- Col. Horatio Rogers, Jr.

Third Brigade- Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton, Col. David J. Nevin
62nd New York Infantry- Col. David J. Nevin
93rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. John I. Nevin
98th Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. John B. Kohler
139th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Fredrick H. Collier

Artillery Brigade- Col. Charles H. Tompkins
Battery A, 1st Massachusetts Light Artillery- Capt. William H. McCartney
1st New York Independent Battery- Capt. Andrew Cowan
3rd New York Independent Battery- Capt. William A. Harn
Battery C, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery-Capt. Richard Waterman
Battery G, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery- Capt. George A. Adams
Battery D, 2nd United States Artillery-Lt. Edward B. Williston
Battery G, 2nd United States Artillery- Lt. John H. Butler
Battery F, 5th United States Artillery- Lt. Leonard Martin

ELEVENTH ARMY CORPS
Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz

FIRST DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Francis C. Barlow (w), Brig. Gen. Adelbert Ames

First Brigade-
Col. Leopold von Gilsa
41st New York Infantry (9 cos.)- Lt. Col. Detleo Von Einsiedal
54th New York Infantry- Maj. Stephen Kovacs (c), Lt. Ernst Both
68th New York Infantry- Col. Gotthilf Bourry
153rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Maj. John F. Frueauff

Second Brigade- Brig. Gen. Adelbert Ames, Col. Andrew L. Harris
17th Connecticut Infantry- Lt. Col. Douglas Fowler (k), Maj. Allen G. Brady
25th Ohio Infantry- Lt. Col. Jeremiah Williams (c), Capt. Nathaniel J. Manning (w), Lt. William Maloney, Lt. Israel White
75th Ohio Infantry- Col. Andrew L. Harris, Capt. George B. Fox
107th Ohio Infantry- Col. Seraphim Meyer, Capt. John M. Lutz

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr

First Brigade- Col. Charles R. Coster
134th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Allan H. Jackson
154th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Daniel B. Allen
27th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Lorenz Cantador
73rd Pennsylvania Infantry- Capt. Daniel F. Kelley

Second Brigade- Col. Orlando Smith
33rd Massachusetts Infantry- Col. Adin B. Underwood
136th New York Infantry- Col. James Wood, Jr.
55th Ohio Infantry- Col. Charles B. Gambee
73rd Ohio Infantry- Lt. Col. Richard Long

THIRD DIVISION- Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz, Brig. Gen. Alexander Schimmelfennig

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Alexander Schimmelfennig (m), Col. George Von Amsberg
82nd Illinois Infantry- Col. Edward S. Salomon
45th New YorkInfantry- Col. George Von Amsberg, Lt. Col. Adophus Dobke
157th New York Infantry- Col. Philip P. Brown, Jr.
61st Ohio Infantry- Col. Stephen J. McGroarty
74th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Adolph Von Hartung, Lt. Col. Alexander von Mitzel (w), Capt. Gustav Schleiter, Capt. Henry Krauseneck

Second Brigade- Col. Wladimir Krzyzanowski
58th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. August Otto (w), Capt. Emil Koenig
119th New York Infantry- Col. John T. Lockman (w), Lt. Col. Edward F. Lloyd
82nd Ohio Infantry- Col. James S. Robinson (w), Lt. Col. David Thomson
75th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. Francis Mahler (mw), Major August Ledig
26th Wisconsin Infantry- Lt. Col. Hans Boebel (w), Capt. John W. Fuchs

Artillery Brigade- Maj. Thomas W. Osborn
Battery I, 1st New York Light Artillery- Capt. Michael Weidrich
13th New York Independent Battery- Lieut. William Wheeler
Battery I, 1st Ohio Light Artillery- Capt. Hubert Dilger
Battery K, 1st Ohio Light Artillery- Capt. Lewis Heckman
Battery G, 4th United States Artillery- Lt. Bayard Wilkeson (mw), Lt. Eugene A. Bancroft

TWELFTH ARMY CORPS
Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum , Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams

FIRST DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger

First Brigade- Col. Archibald L. McDougall
5th Connecticut Infantry- Col. Warren W. Packer
20th Connecticut Infantry- Lt. Col. William B. Wooster
3rd Maryland Infantry- Col. Joseph M. Sudsburg
123rd New York Infantry- Lt. Col. James C. Rogers, Capt. Adolphus H. Tanner
145th New York Infantry- Col. Edward J. Price
46th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. James L. Selfridge

Second Brigade- Brig. Gen. Henry H. Lockwood
1st Maryland Infantry, Potomac Home Brigade- Col. William P. Maulsby
1st Maryland Infantry, Eastern Shore- Col. James Wallace
150th New York Infantry- Col. John H. Ketcham

Third Brigade- Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger, Col. Silas Colgrove
27th Indiana Infantry- Col. Silas Colgrove, Lt. Col. John R. Fesler
2nd Massachusetts Infantry- Lt. Col. Charles R. Mudge (k), Maj. Charles F. Morse
13th New Jersey Infantry- Col. Ezra A. Carman
107th New York Infantry- Col. Nirom M. Crane
3rd Wisconsin Infantry- Col. William Hawley

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. John W. Geary

First Brigade- Col. Charles Candy
5th Ohio Infantry- Col. John H. Patrick
7th Ohio Infantry- Col. William R. Creighton
29th Ohio Infantry- Capt. Wilbur F. Stevens (w), Capt. Edward Hayes
66th Ohio Infantry- Lieut. Col. Eugene Powell
28th Pennsylvania Infantry- Capt. John H. Flynn
147th Pennsylvania Infantry (8 cos.)- Lt. Col. Ario Pardee, Jr.

Second Brigade- Col. George A. Cobham, Jr., Brig. Gen. Thomas L. Kane
29th Pennsylvania Infantry- Col. William Rickards, Jr.
109th Pennsylvania Infantry- Capt. Frederick L. Gimber
111th Pennsylvania Infantry- Lt. Col. Thomas L. Walker, Col. George A. Cobham, Jr.

Third Brigade- Brig. Gen. George S. Greene
60th New York Infantry- Col. Abel Godard
78th New York Infantry- Lt. Col. Herbert Von Hammerstein
102nd New York Infantry- Col. James C. Lane (w), Capt. Lewis R. Stegman
137th New York Infantry- Col. David Ireland
149th New York Infantry- Col. Henry A. Barnum, Lt. Col. Charles B. Randall (w), Capt. Nicholas Grumbach

Artillery Brigade- Lt. Edward D. Muhlenberg
Battery M, 1st New York Light Artillery- Lt. Charles E. Winegar
Battery E, Independent Pennsylvania Light Artillery- Lt. Charles A. Atwell
Battery F, 4th United States Artillery- Lt. Sylvanus T. Rugg
Battery K, 5th United States Artillery-Lt. David H. Kinzie

CAVALRY CORPS
Maj. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton

FIRST DIVISION- Brig. Gen. John Buford

First Brigade- Col. William Gamble
8th Illinois Cavalry- Maj. John L. Beveridge
12th Illinois Cavalry (6 cos.)- Col. George H. Chapman
3rd Indiana Cavalry (6 cos.)- Col. George H. Chapman
8th New York Cavalry- Lt. Col. William L. Markell

Second Brigade- Col. Thomas C. Devin
6th New York Cavalry- Maj. William E. Beardsley
9th New York Cavalry- Col. William Sackett
17th Pennsylvania Cavalry- Col. Josiah H. Kellogg
3rd West Virginia Cavalry (2 cos.)- Capt. Seymour B. Conger

Reserve Brigade- Brig. Gen. Wesley Merritt
6th Pennsylvania Cavalry- Maj. James H. Haseltine
1st United States Cavalry- Capt. Richard S. C. Lord
2nd United States Cavalry- Capt. Theophilus F. Rodenbough
5th United States Cavalry- Capt. Julius W. Mason
6th United States Cavalry- Maj. Samuel H. Starr (w), Lt. Louis H. Carpenter, Lt. Nicholas Nolan, Capt. Ira W. Claflin

SECOND DIVISION- Brig. Gen. David McM. Gregg

First Brigade- Col. John B. McIntosh
1st Maryland Cavalry (11 cos.)- Lt. Col. James M. Deems
Purnell (Maryland) Legion Co. (A) (Capt. Robert E. Duvall
1st Massachusetts Cavalry- Lieut. Col. Greely S. Curtis
1st New Jersey Cavalry- Maj. Myron H. Beaumont
1st Pennsylvania Cavalry- Col. John P. Taylor
3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry- Lt. Col. Edward S. Jones
Battery H (One Section), 3rd Pennsylvania Artillery- Capt. William D. Rank

Second Brigade- Col. Pennock Huey (Guarding trains and railroads, not present at Gettysburg)
2nd New York Cavalry- Lt. Col. Otto Harhaus
4th New York Cavalry- Lt. Col. Augustus Pruyn
6th Ohio Cavalry ( 10 cos.)- Maj. William Stedman
8th Pennsylvania Cavalry- Capt. William Corrie

Third Brigade- Col. J. Irvin Gregg
1st Maine Cavalry (10 cos.)- Lt. Col. Charles H. Smith
10th New York Cavalry- Maj. M. Henry Avery
4th Pennsylvania Cavalry- Lt. Col. William E. Doster
16th Pennsylvania Cavalry- Lt. Col. John K. Robinson

THIRD DIVISION- Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, Col. Nathaniel P. Richmond

First Brigade- Brig. Gen. Elon J. Farnsworth
5th New York Cavalry- Maj. John Hammond
18th Pennsylvania Cavalry- Lt. Col. William P. Brinton
1st Vermont Cavalry- Lt. Col. Addison W. Preston
1st West Virginia Cavalry (10 cos.)- Col. Nathaniel P. Richmond, Maj. Charles E. Capehart

Second Brigade- Brig. Gen. George A. Custer
1st Michigan Cavalry- Col. Charles H. Town
5th Michigan Cavalry- Col. Russell A. Alger
6th Michigan Cavalry- Col. George Gray
7th Michigan Cavalry (10 cos.)- Col. William D. Mann

HORSE ARTILLERY

First Brigade- Capt. James M. Robertson
9th Michigan Battery- Capt. Jabez J. Daniels
6th New York Independent Battery- Capt. Joseph W. Martin
Batteries B & L, 2nd United States Artillery- Lt. Edward Heaton
Battery M, 2nd United States Artillery- Lt. A. C. M. Pennington, Jr.
Battery E, 4th United States Artillery- Lt. Samuel S. Elder

Second Brigade- Capt. John C. Tidball
Batteries E & G, 1st United States Artillery- Capt. Alanson M. Randol
Battery K, 1st United States Artillery- Capt. William M. Graham
Battery A, 2nd United States Artillery- Lt. John H. Calef

ARTILLERY RESERVE
Brig. Gen. Robert O. Tyler, Capt. James M. Robertson

First Regular Brigade- Capt. Dunbar R. Ransom
Battery H, 1st United States Artillery- Lt. Chandler P. Eakin
Batteries F & K, 3rd United States Artillery- Lt. John G. Turnbull
Battery C, 4th United States Artillery- Lt. Evan Thomas
Battery C, 5th United States Artillery- Lt. Gulian V. Weir (w)

First Volunteer Brigade- Lt. Col. Freeman McGilvery
5th Battery, Massachusetts Light Artillery- Capt. Charles A. Phillips
9th Battery, Massachusetts Light Artillery- Capt. John Bigelow
15th New York Independent Battery- Capt. Patrick Hart
Batteries C & F, Pennsylvania Independent Light Artillery- Capt. James Thompson

Second Volunteer Brigade- Capt. Elijah D. Taft
2nd Connecticut Battery- Capt. John W. Sterling
5th New York Independent Battery- Capt. Elijah D. Taft

Third Volunteer Brigade- Capt. James F. Huntington
1st Battery, New Hampshire Light Artillery- Capt. Frederick M. Edgell
Battery H, 1st Ohio Light Artillery- Lt. George W. Norton
Batteries F & G, 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery- Capt. R. Bruce Ricketts
Battery C, 1st West Virginia Light Artillery- Capt. Wallace Hill

Fourth Volunteer Brigade- Capt. Robert H. Fitzhugh
6th Battery (F), Maine Light Artillery- -Lt. Edwin B. Dow
Battery A, 1st Maryland Light Artillery- Capt. James H. Rigby
Battery A, 1st New Jersey Light Artillery- Lt. Agustin N. Parsons
Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery- Capt. Nelson Ames
Battery K, 1st New York Light Artillery and 11th New York Independent Battery - Capt. Robert H. Fitzhugh

ARMY HEADQUARTERS
Maj. Gen. George G. Meade

Chief of Staff: Major Gen. Daniel Butterfield (w)
Chief of Engineers: Brig. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren (w)
Chief of Artillery: Brig. Gen. Henry Hunt
Asst. Adjutant General: Brig. Gen. Seth Williams
Chief QM: Brig. Gen. Rufus Ingalls
Medical Director: Dr. Jonathon Letterman
Chief Signal Officer: Capt. Lemuel B. Norton
Chief Ordnance Officer: Lt. John R. Edie
Provost Marshal: Brig. Gen. Marsena Patrick

HQ Guard: Co. C, 32nd Massachusetts Infantry- Capt. Josiah C. Fuller
HQ Escort: Oneida (NY) Cavalry- Capt. Daniel P. Mann

Engineer Brigade- Brig. Gen. Henry W. Benham
15th New York Engineers- Maj. Walter L. Cassin
50th New York Engineers- Col. William H. Pettes
US Engineer Battalion- Capt. George H. Mendell



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